Day: July 6, 2020

First MFA Textiles Graduates at Parsons Are Multidisciplinary, Ready for New Challenges In and Out of Fashion

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Three years after embarking on the MFA Textile program at The New School’s Parsons School of Design, the inaugural graduates were not about to let the pandemic lockdown dampen their imaginative ideas.

Each of the 16 graduates have created textiles that intersect craft, technology and sustainability. “I’m so proud and I’m so sad. I’m incredibly impressed by their attitude and endurance. And the way they handled COVID-19 was so positive and so mature. They were also strong,” said Li Edelkoort, who envisioned the MFA Textiles program in 2015.

It launched three years later under the leadership of program director Preeti Gopinath. After stay-at-home mandates required students to exit the classroom, Edelkoort kept up contact online. “They were all in their own houses and apartments with dogs and husbands and boyfriends and roommates — often in very small spaces. They knew how to adapt

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‘Bachelor’ Alex Michel Is Apparently Still Single Today

From Women’s Health

When he uttered the words, “Will you accept this rose?”Alex Michel started a sensation. As the very first Bachelor, he also forever transformed Monday nights as fans discovered the joy of following his journey to find love—and all the drama along the way.

His tenure on The Bachelor was 18 years ago. (I know, mind blown.) It’s all coming back, though, as part of ABC’s The Bachelor Greatest Of All Time. That seems like a lifetime ago, and to be sure, some recent contestants were definitely not old enough to remember Alex’s season when it aired.

In case you need a refresher on the guy who started it all, here’s what you need to know about Alex Michel as The Bachelor and everything he’s been up to the last two decades.

Alex was a ‘normal guy’ when he joined The Bachelor.

When Alex became The

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ICE Threatens to Deport Foreign Students if They’re Attending School via Zoom

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Like other schools, colleges and universities are in the midst of finalizing their plans for how to educate students while protecting them from the novel coronavirus. Will they remain online only, invite all students back to campus, or provide a hybrid of the two approaches so that fewer students will crowd together in buildings? U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) just complicated matters for the many schools with foreign students enrolled.

Back when all campuses shut down in the spring, ICE temporarily suspended a rule for type F-1 (academic coursework) and M-1 (vocational coursework) nonimmigrant student visas that had previously limited the number of online classes students could take. On Monday, instead of simply extending that suspension, the agency announced that in order to stay in the U.S., students can take some but not all their courses online. If their school goes online-only,

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Atlanta mayor says she has tested positive

A pandemic of the novel coronavirus has now killed more than 535,000 people worldwide.

Over 11.5 million people across the globe have been diagnosed with COVID-19, the disease caused by the new respiratory virus, according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. The actual numbers are believed to be much higher due to testing shortages, many unreported cases and suspicions that some governments are hiding the scope of their nations’ outbreaks.

Since the first cases were detected in China in December, the United States has become the worst-affected country, with more than 2.9 million diagnosed cases and at least 130,101 deaths.

Atlanta mayor says she has tested positive California’s positivity rate climbs Miami-Dade closing restaurants, gyms, rentals Harvard, Princeton announce back-to-school plans

Here’s how the news is developing today. All times Eastern. Please refresh this page for updates

Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance … Read More

Harvard is keeping classes online this fall, placing it among the 8% of US colleges planning to do so. Here’s the list so far.

A graduate gets ready to pose for a picture at the empty campus of San Diego State University, after the California State University system announced the fall 2020 semester will be online, May 13, 2020.
A graduate gets ready to pose for a picture at the empty campus of San Diego State University, after the California State University system announced the fall 2020 semester will be online, May 13, 2020.

Mike Blake/Reuters

  • Harvard University announced Monday that it will only conduct classes online for the coming academic year, though it will allow some students to live on campus.

  • Other universities and colleges across the US — including the country’s largest four-year public university system, California State University— are opting for online-only courses in the fall 2020 semester.

  • The coronavirus could resurge in the fall, bringing a new wave of infections.

  • Here are the schools that aren’t planning to return to campus this fall.

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

After a semester of remote courses and online graduations, some colleges and universities are deciding not to return for in-person classes this fall.

Harvard announced

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‘Shocking level of bipartisan support’ means Big Tech is facing big (and costly) change

Once seen as a critical tool for internet platforms to police lewd and objectionable online speech, Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act has gained growing bipartisan support as a law in need of fixing.

Enacted in 1996, Section 230 exempts online platforms from liability for most user-generated speech. President Donald Trump has taken aim at changing the law in a fight against Twitter (TWTR), putting tech giants in legal and regulatory crosshairs that are likely to outlast the current election cycle.

Democrats and Republicans alike voice increasing antipathy over sweeping liability protections that 230 affords to all online platforms — including Facebook (FB), Instagram, YouTube (GOOG) (GOOGL). All told, experts say it’s becoming clear that change is coming.

“If Trump is reelected, frankly even if he isn’t reelected, you might see variations on this proposal coming into some type of effect next year, with a shocking level of bipartisan … Read More

16.3M homeowners miss out on mortgage refinance savings

Mortgage rates have fallen to new all-time lows so many times this year that it’s almost getting routine. “Really? Again?”

But if you’re a homeowner, don’t let me catch you yawning, or shrugging off these milestones. Because a new record low means there are more old mortgages out there that are worth refinancing at lower interest — maybe including your current loan.

Thanks to the latest new floor for mortgage rates, more than 16 million mortgage holders are now good refi candidates and are missing out on hundreds of dollars in savings per month, according to a report released Monday by the mortgage data firm Black Knight.

Find out whether you’re in that group.

As rates slide, opportunities open up

Andrii Yalanskyi / Shutterstock

Rates on 30-year fixed-rate mortgages dropped last week to an all-time-low average of 3.07%, according to mortgage giant Freddie Mac, which has been conducting weekly

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Lessons from a Robinhood Trader’s Suicide

As an advocate for young adults prudently beginning their investing journey as soon as possible, I’ve found it difficult to shake this recent story: A young man from Illinois took his own life less than 24 hours after checking his Robinhood account and seeing a negative cash balance of over $730,000. 

For those who might not know, Robinhood is an online trading and investing platform that has become incredibly popular in recent years for the movement it sparked in the brokerage industry toward commission-free trading. The service boasts more than 13 million users with an average age of 31. Almost every incumbent broker must now offer this feature, lest they be unable to compete effectively against lower-cost peers.  

But this story isn’t just about Robinhood. In recent years, several Robinhood alternatives have sprouted up offering similar functionality for the same cost and often induce investors to sign up with

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The Six Best Compost Bins to Buy Online, According to Thousands of Reviews

Once you’ve learned the basics of how to compost, the next step is investing in a quality compost bin. Indoor compost bins are designed to simply store your food scraps until you can transfer them to an outdoor composter, which is where they will actually start to decompose. And having the right one is crucial to making this environmentally friendly practice a regular habit that gets the best results. Not only does composting provide you with a nutrient-rich treatment for your plants, but you’ll also significantly reduce the amount of food waste your household puts in the trash. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, there are also sustainability benefits: “Making compost keeps these materials out of landfills where they take up space and release methane, a potent greenhouse gas.”

It’s worth investing in a dedicated bin for composting in your home or garden because these products much more convenient

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Stanley from ‘The Office’ Is Trying to Raise $300,000 to Make a Spinoff Episode

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While NBCUniversal continues to hope for a reboot of “The Office” on the upcoming Peacock streaming platform, a new and unexpected continuation of the beloved sitcom is taking shape online. Leslie David Baker, who starred as Stanley Hudson on all nine seasons of “The Office,” has launched a Kickstarter campaign to help fund a spinoff centered around his character. Baker’s Stanley was a recurring character on the first season of “The Office” before being upped to a series regular for the remaining eight seasons.

Baker’s “Office” spinoff is titled “Uncle Stan: Coming Out of Retirement.” The synopsis for the project reads: “After enjoying his retirement in Florida, carving wood, enjoying the white sand beaches, and dancing to old disco, Uncle Stan (Baker) gets a call from his nephew Lucky in Los Angeles asking for help with his two kids and running his motorcycle/flower

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