Day: July 21, 2020

This is the age when women and men make the most money

The Bureau of Labor Statistics released data showing that in the U.S., women earn 81 cents for every one dollar that men make in 2020. The gender pay gap looks at the median salary for men and women regardless of their job type or seniority within their organization.

An analysis of the data shows that the pay gap forms early, meaning that men earn more from the start. Women not only earn less money than men, but their peak earning age is lower than the average peak earning age of men.

Median annual income of men and women

Below is the median annual income of men (as of the second quarter of 2020) divided by age group:

  • 16 to 19 years old: $26,936 annually

  • 20 to 24 years: $34,424 annually

  • 25 to 34 years: $50,076 annually

  • 35 to 44 years: $64,428 annually

  • 45 to 54 years: $66,092 annually

  • 55 to

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As Shoppers Go Digital Amid the Pandemic, Here’s How Neiman Marcus Is Adapting Its Services

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Neiman Marcus is expanding its roster of online services as the coronavirus pandemic continues to change the way shoppers engage with retailers.

The luxury department store announced today the launch of a digital hub dubbed Your Neiman’s, where customers can secure personal appointments in stores, set up curbside pickup, learn about trends and designers during virtual events or engage via video with the chain’s stylists.

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“The world is changing, and we’re all adjusting our habits to accommodate the new normal,” president and chief customer officer David Goubert said in a statement. “The comfort and safety of our customers and associates are our utmost priority. We’ve introduced innovative ways to be here for them, now in more ways than ever.”

As state and local governments loosen lockdown restrictions on nonessential businesses, Neiman Marcus is gradually reopening its locations across the

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How to Request a Flexible Schedule if You’re a Working Parent

No matter how old we are or how long we’ve been working, we all have questions when it comes to careers—from how to respond to a rejection letter to learning to say no when a role isn’t a good fit. That’s where Career Counselor comes in. In this weekly series, we connect with experts to answer all of your work-related questions. Because while we don’t all have the luxury of a career coach, we still deserve to grow in our careers.

While some companies in the U.S. are starting to require their employees to come back to the office, many working parents don’t have the ability to go back to their in-person work routines because childcare centers and schools are still close or partly re-opening. Rather, they need (and deserve) a flexible schedule to help them achieve a feasible work-life balance.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 80.3%

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Hollywood Stylist Anita Patrickson Making Amanu Sandals Customizable Online

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Stylist and sandal entrepreneur Anita Patrickson is bringing her West Hollywood Amanu boutique’s signature in-store customization experience online.

“We get so many tourists who book for months in advance, and I thought there had to be a way to bring the experience to them, pulling in technology similar to what Nike ID and Vans use for their sneakers, but for my sandals,” she said, explaining her pivot to address the pandemic’s impact on sales in her Melrose Avenue store, which has reopened by appointment only.

Amanu is offering a web-based customization program (using a Shopify plug-in), that allows customers to follow steps to create their own styles using different materials and colors, with more than 50,000 potential combinations. The shoes ship out with standard measurements within a couple of days, along with a fit card to make size adjustments, and a complimentary two-day

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The global sneaker resale market could reach $30 billion by 2030

A little over a year has passed since Cowen Equity Research classified sneakers as an emerging alternative asset class. Since then, sneakers have not only emerged, but the market itself shows no signs of slowing. Cowen analysts believe that the sneaker resale market could potentially reach $30 billion by 2030.

“With a growing base of passionate investors, a growing source of supply and authentication, sneakers: 1) earns illiquidity premiums; 2) provides diversification – non-correlated with traditional asset classes; and 3) earns favorable risk-reward characteristics,” the analysts wrote in a research note.

In 2019, Cowen estimated that the total global sneaker market stood at $100 billion. The U.S. primary sneakers market — or the market for new sneakers — was worth more than $21 billion. The global and U.S. resale market stood at $6 and $2 billion, respectively.

John Kernan, an analyst at Cowen, tells Yahoo Finance that the sneaker resale

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Schools Can’t Reopen Safely Without A Lot More Money. Congress Is Running Out Of Time.

WASHINGTON ― In a matter of weeks, millions of children will head back to school in the middle of a pandemic, leaving millions more parents filled with anxiety about risking their child’s health ― not to mention school staff ― to get an education.

Public schools cannot safely reopen without a massive infusion of emergency funding from Congress, which is already dangerously late to this. Think of all the things a single school needs: Hand sanitizers and disinfectant wipes for classrooms. No-touch thermometers. Regular deep cleanings, which means hiring more custodial staff. Ensuring that every school has at least one full-time nurse (25% of schools have no nurse at all). Someone on every school bus to screen kids’ temperatures before boarding. Gloves and masks for staff. Masks for students who don’t bring one from home. Resuming before- and after-school child care programs with new cleaning protocols.

That doesn’t even factor

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100 Bowls Of Soup Shifts Focus To Carry On

HERNDON, VA — Like many Herndon small business owners, Katharine Mardirosian had to look at her business in a completely different way due to the coronavirus pandemic.

When Patch talked to the owner and founder of 100 Bowls of Soup back in April, she said the Sunset Business Park was like a ghost town, with so many non-essential businesses closed because of Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam’s stay-at-home order.

“It’s really hard to see all of these businesses,” Mardirosian said, at the time. “They’re trying their best to adapt. I think that’s an inspiring message from what I’ve seen is the way with which many of these businesses have adapted, put their offerings online, tried to offer some semblance of a menu, even if it’s a carryout/curbside order.”

As a small-scale food production business, 100 Bowls of Soup did not have to close its doors, but Mardirosian did have to scale

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How the Miami school district has been uniquely prepared for the COVID pandemic

School reopenings have become a hotly debated issue across the U.S. as the Trump administration is threatening to withhold funds from schools that do not open in-person as scheduled. A number of public school systems such as New York have begun to plan for the new year. Many plans call for an extension of online-only learning through the fall.

One school system that may be better prepared for a reopening despite its state’s rising COVID-19 cases is that of the Miami-Dade County Public Schools (M-DCPS) school district.

Operating under extremely challenging environmental conditions isn’t new for the district, Alberto M. Carvalho, the district’s superintendent, told Yahoo Finance.

“The reason why we had the seamless transition from traditional schooling to distance learning is because we had been somewhat influenced by the fact that we are coastal towns subject to periodic hurricane threats,” he said. “So we do have experience in shutting

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Before You Walk Onto a Car Lot, Beware Yo-Yo Financing

Imagine you’re proudly driving around town in your new car when your cell phone rings. It’s the dealer telling you there is a problem with your financing.

“Basically, they tell you that you’ve got credit [and a deal]. You drive the car home and then they call you back up and say, ‘oh by the way, that credit didn’t work. You need to bring your car back in. You need to sign new terms.’ And the new terms are always worse,” says Ira Rheingold, executive director of the National Association of Consumer Advocates.

The practice is called yo-yo financing.

How Common is Yo-Yo Financing?

Sadly, yo-yo financing is common with both new and used cars and usually ends with a higher interest rate and worse loan terms. Rheingold says women, African-Americans and Latinos are disproportionately victimized.

Yo-yo financing often happens with a spot delivery of the vehicle, meaning a customer

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President Trump’s campaign to paint Joe Biden as mentally unfit becomes a gamble

WASHINGTON – Less than four months from the November election, President Donald Trump’s attacks on presumptive Democratic nominee Joe Biden’s mental fitness are an integral part of the president’s reelection message: the focus of television advertisements, talking points and open challenges from the president.

But analysts have raised questions over whether Trump’s strategy of focusing on the former vice president’s age is backfiring with a key demographic: seniors.

Making it an even riskier play, the attacks have heightened expectations for Trump’s debate performances this fall and invited skepticism about his own fitness. The strategy itself has proven difficult to execute as Biden campaigns from his home in Delaware, limiting the gaffe-prone candidate’s opportunities for flubs.

For months, Biden, 77, has dismissed the name-calling and innuendo, but more recently he’s hitting back more forcefully and trying to turn the argument about mental fitness back on the 74-year-old Trump.

“This president talks

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