Day: July 29, 2020

‘What’s going to happen to that terrific little town?’

Director Ron Howard may be a Hollywood icon, but it was his ties to Northern California that convinced him to make “Rebuilding Paradise,” a documentary detailing the 2018 Camp Fire and the recovery process that followed. The movie – distributed by National Geographic Documentary Films – will be available to stream beginning Friday, July 31.

“I followed the Carr Fire in Redding,” Howard said during a phone interview this week. “I have a lot of relatives up there, and then the Camp Fire hit Paradise. That’s a place I’ve been also. … Like many things, once you relate to the horrific images you’re seeing, it just resonates more deeply and it really stirred my curiosity.”

“Rebuilding Paradise” spends significant time detailing the events of Nov. 8, when the Camp Fire swept through Paradise, destroying much of the town and becoming the most destructive wildfire in California history, but Howard said

Read More

CEOs of Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google face congressional antitrust grilling

The chiefs of four of the biggest tech companies in the world — Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google — will face lawmakers Wednesday for a hearing on digital competition that could have cataclysmic impacts on an industry largely unhindered by regulators.

The grilling of tech titans Jeff Bezos, Tim Cook, Mark Zuckerberg and Sundar Pichai (the companies’ respective CEOs), will be done by the House Judiciary Antitrust Subcommittee as part of its ongoing, year-long investigation into competition in the digital market.

Here is the latest on how the news is developing today. All times Eastern. Check back for updates.

Rep. Mary Scanlon says, when the pandemic hit, “Amazon said it was going to delay shipment of nonessential products.” She accused the e-commerce giant of applying that policy selectively and asked why “Amazon devices like Fire TV, Echo speakers and Ring doorbells” were deemed essential during the pandemic.

“There was no … Read More

10 myths and truths about Clearing

Clearing - Alec Doherty
Clearing – Alec Doherty

A-level results day is stressful enough this year as a result of the pandemic, so having a basic understanding of the university Clearing process in advance can be a very useful tool to have.  

Separate fact from fiction with our helpful UCAS Clearing myth-buster. 

MYTH: Clearing opens on A-level-results day

The 2020 Clearing process was available for use from July 6. If you had already received your exam results, but didn’t have any university offers, you could have used Clearing from this date onwards. IB results were published on July 6, for instance, while Scottish Qualifications Authority results came out on August 4. “The general rule is that, when you’ve got your results, you can use Clearing,” say UCAS. Not all course spaces were available at this earlier stage, though, so you haven’t missed out.

MYTH: Russell Group universities don’t use Clearing

They most certainly do.

Read More

How to Make Your Product Imagery Stand Out on E-Commerce, Without New Photoshoots

Between inventory challenges and a new focus on e-commerce, brands are tasked with promoting their current merchandise in a compelling way — often without access to relevant imagery or the capacity to create new visual content. A new e-commerce solution, Stylitics, aims to help brands convert their existing product assets into exciting new content, to help showcase styles online.

“With all this attention online, merchants are scrambling to figure out what images they have to show for new products and collections,” said Rohan Deuskar, founder and CEO of Stylitics. “If retailers had catalogs or model shoots completed before the pandemic, they are using what they can to showcase products that may or may not be in stock.”

Brand content is playing a bigger role now, as more shoppers are increasingly turning to online channels to buy, due to convenience and safety precautions. They still want to experience the product in

Read More

How To Explain To Your Kids That Money Is Tight Right Now

Parents set the tone for conversations about money. (Photo: Westend61 via Getty Images)
Parents set the tone for conversations about money. (Photo: Westend61 via Getty Images)

The economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic is hardly a secret. More than 50 million Americans have filed for unemployment since March, and food insecurity has risen to unprecedented levels. 

If you’re a parent whose financial situation has changed due to the pandemic, you may be struggling to determine the best way to convey this new reality to your children. Fortunately, there are healthy and educational ways to have conversations about family finances with children. 

To help inform these discussions, HuffPost asked a few experts about how parents can explain to kids that money is tight right now. Read on for their advice. Although our discussions focused on the current recession, this guidance can apply to other economic circumstances as well. 

Inform, but don’t overshare.

“Regarding any discussion with children, whether it be about the pandemic or

Read More

Sacramento fall sports shutdowns hit parents, coaches

As the debate on whether to open California schools during the coronavirus pandemic continues, many Sacramento area fall sports have been postponed or canceled, affecting children and families.

The cancellations have caused uncertainty for many households, especially those with young children. If parents have to work and are unable to get a caretaker for their kids or put them in an activity, it can cause stress.

Richard Graham is the 14U coach for the Roseville Junior Tigers, a travel football team.

In addition to coaching, he has three sons of his own. His 14-year-old plays football, while his 7- and 8-year-olds play soccer. He also sponsors and coaches four other children who do not have father figures.

Graham notes that in wealthier areas, parents are more likely to be in the picture and can afford to do more with their kids. “Not everyone has that,” he said.

“It’s not just

Read More

The availability of ‘animal crush’ content has created a cat-and-mouse subculture of attention-seeking animal abusers and the web sleuths who suss them out

Those who make animal torture videos can escalate from bugs, to mice, and then eventually larger domesticated pets, experts say.
Those who make animal torture videos can escalate from bugs, to mice, and then eventually larger domesticated pets, experts say.

Universal Images Group via Getty Images

  • “Animal crush” videos are an extreme version of violent porn shared online where animals are filmed being tortured and killed.

  • These graphic videos break animal cruelty laws, as well as federal “animal crush” distribution statutes.

  • Animal crush videos are nothing new, but a recent case involving an Indiana woman peaked an web sleuth movement where animal advocates around the world worked long hours to track her down. 

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Editor’s Note: This story contains graphic details about animal abuse and cruelty.

Lisa Kauffman is no stranger to animal abuse.

As the Idaho and Wyoming state director for the Humane Society of the United States, she’s gone into homes where cats and dogs were beaten, neglected, and emaciated. She’s walked past

Read More

Tech CEOs go on defense

Four of the nation’s most powerful CEOs beamed into a Capitol Hill hearing Wednesday and raised their hands to swear to tell the truth as they faced a barrage of questions on one major issue: Are their companies too big and powerful for America’s good?

Lawmakers hammered Google Sundar Pichai about his company’s relations with China and whether it steals ideas from other businesses, Facebook chief executive Mark Zuckerberg about a blizzard of disinformation plaguing his social network, and Apple CEO Tim Cook on whether his iPhone-maker strong-arms developers on its App Store.

Perhaps surprisingly, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos — making his long-awaited first-ever appearance before a congressional hearing — had faced no question nearly two hours into the session.

The virtual testimony, in a hearing of the House Judiciary Committee’s antitrust subcommittee, comes at a time of rising legal jeopardy for the major tech companies, who are the subject

Read More

NJ Courts To Resolve Cases Without In-Person Appearances

NEW JERSEY – A court appearance may no longer be required under a recent change to municipal court operations in New Jersey.

The Judiciary’s Online Dispute Resolution (ODR) program, which started in mid-May in approximately 30 municipal courts, allows court users to dispute a charge and provide information or evidence to municipal prosecutors online.

“These changes are part of a larger effort to make our municipal court system more efficient and more accessible,” said Chief Justice Stuart Rabner. “Court users should not have to find childcare or take a day off from work to travel to the courthouse to speak to a prosecutor and try to resolve traffic offenses or routine matters.”

The ODR program applies to 37 traffic offenses, such as speeding, failure to have an insurance card, or failure to yield, where defendants commonly provide additional documentation and seek a reduced charge before pleading guilty.

How it works:

Read More

How to Make Your Product Imagery Stand Out on E-Commerce, Without a New Photoshoots

Between inventory challenges and a new focus on e-commerce, brands are tasked with promoting their current merchandise in a compelling way — often without access to relevant imagery or the capacity to create new visual content. A new e-commerce solution, Stylitics, aims to help brands convert their existing product assets into exciting new content, to help showcase styles online.

“With all this attention online, merchants are scrambling to figure out what images they have to show for new products and collections,” said Rohan Deuskar, founder and CEO of Stylitics. “If retailers had catalogs or model shoots completed before the pandemic, they are using what they can to showcase products that may or may not be in stock.”

Brand content is playing a bigger role now, as more shoppers are increasingly turning to online channels to buy, due to convenience and safety precautions. They still want to experience the product in

Read More