Day: September 12, 2020

Smoke thickens near Shaver Lake, fire moving toward Blue Canyon

Firefighters tried to take advantage of Saturday’s cooler temperatures as the Creek Fire raged nearly out of control.

The blaze swelled overnight to 196,667 acres with at least 369 structures ruined, including dozens of homes and businesses in Sierra National Forest mountain communities in eastern Fresno and Madera counties.

Containment remained at just 6% midday Saturday as about 1,811 firefighters battled what already has become the 16th largest wildfire in California’s history.

See dramatic photos, videos of the Creek Fire burning in California

The Creek Fire erupted Sept. 4 near Big Creek and Huntington Lake. The cause remained under investigation. Full containment isn’t expected until mid-October.

The Creek Fire is one of 28 major wildfires racing through California, including 13 new fires that broke out Friday, Cal Fire said Saturday. More than 16,000 firefighters are battling flames statewide.

3:45 p.m.: Map gives initial look at property damage

Cal Fire, in

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U.S. Has Its Deadliest Day in More Than Two Weeks: Virus Update

The U.S. reported its deadliest day since Aug. 26 while the global death toll from the novel coronavirus moved closer to 1 million. The University of Oxford is resuming trials of an experimental vaccine with AstraZeneca Plc after a halt due to a participant who fell ill.

France, Europe’s latest hot spot, reported the most cases since ending a national lockdown four months ago. Florida’s cases rose slightly. Canada reported no Covid-related deaths for the first time in six months.

Trump administration aides asked for the right to read and suggest changes to weekly Covid-19 reports from the Centers for Disease Control, Politico reported.

Global Tracker: Cases rise above 28.5 million; deaths exceed 917,100Trump’s stimulus end run fizzles as firms spurn payroll tax haltIn smoky San Francisco, Covid-hit businesses suffer double blowThe University of Illinois shows there’s no foolproof reopening planHow hotels are helping their neighbors fight the pandemicWhy telemedicine … Read More

AstraZeneca resumes vaccine trial; Puerto Rico reopens beaches; US downgrades Mexico travel warning

Drug developers are racing to create a COVID-19 vaccine, but a post-pandemic world won’t suddenly arrive when one is successfully developed. 

But a return to “normal living” won’t come until “several months” after a vaccine first arrives, Dr. Anthony Fauci said on CNN. That’s likely to be about a year away, as a successful vaccine still needs to be manufactured and distributed at a massive scale.

In the meantime, Americans are learning more about risks associated with several parts of normal life that remain. Recent Centers for Disease Control and Prevention studies documented health challenges in dining and daycare. One study found dining out was linked with higher infection rates in adults. Another study documented children who were infected in daycare and spread the virus at home. 

Meanwhile colleges continue to be hotspots for the virus: Of the 25 hottest outbreaks in the U.S., communities heavy with college students

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British Airways backs airport testing, as four countries join quarantine list

portugal - Getty
portugal – Getty

British Airways can only survive if Government works with it, including through support for airport Covid-19 testing, according to the carrier’s chief executive and chairman Alex Cruz. 

“These are the toughest times in the history of the aviation industry,” writes Mr Cruz for The Telegraph as four more countries are added to the UK’s travel ‘red list’. 

“Coronavirus has hit our business hard, and the sector is fighting for its very survival,” he adds. “What is hugely frustrating is that we know people want to travel, to fly, whether to see friends or family, to see business contacts face-to-face or to recharge on the beach, but without a rigorous, reliable Coronavirus testing programme – together with a sensible approach to quarantine – people’s plans are being unnecessarily grounded.”

Ongoing changes to the holiday quarantine-list have seen hundreds of thousands of Britons race back to the UK, or

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British Airways backs airport testing as four countries join quarantine list

portugal - Getty
portugal – Getty

British Airways can only survive if the Government works with it, including through support for airport testing, according to the carrier’s chief executive and chairman Alex Cruz. 

“These are the toughest times in the history of the aviation industry,” writes Mr Cruz for The Telegraph as four more countries are added to the UK’s travel “red list”. 

“Coronavirus has hit our business hard, and the sector is fighting for its very survival,” he adds. “What is hugely frustrating is that we know people want to travel, to fly, whether to see friends or family, to see business contacts face-to-face or to recharge on the beach, but without a rigorous, reliable Coronavirus testing programme – together with a sensible approach to quarantine – people’s plans are being unnecessarily grounded.”

Ongoing changes to the holiday quarantine list have seen hundreds of thousands of Britons race back to the UK,

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Your online branding is key to your business success. Here’s your roadmap

TLDR: With The All-In-One Digital Branding Certification Bundle, you’ll have all the training to get a new brand up and running across all the important digital avenues.

No matter how great your product or service is, without an easy, identifiable brand element to encapsulate it all, there’s a good chance your business will fly right past most modern digital audiences.

That means not only defining how you want your business to be seen online, but all the ways it’ll be seen and experienced, from images to text to social media. It’s a lot of ground to cover, but the training in The All-in-One Digital Branding Certification Bundle ($45, over 90 percent off from TNW Deals) explains the basic steps all the platform you have to know and master to get the most out of your business in the digital space.

The bundle features 10 courses with 37 hours of in-depth

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Hey Siri, are you really ’20x’ more on top of it this year? Apple personal assistant getting new look in iOS 14

Apple will stage its traditional post-Labor Day product reveal on Tuesday, where it is expected to tout new editions of the Apple Watch and iPad.

Along the way, there will be new things for Siri to do as well on the iPad, as part of the iOS mobile operating system upgrade. Siri is the oft-maligned but heavily used personal assistant.

This year, Siri will tout a “completely new look,” with “over 20x more facts than just three years ago.” Yes, Apple actually says this, on the promo page for the iOS 14 upgrade, which has traditionally been made available in September. (We first met Siri way back in October 2011, on the iPhone 4S.)

I downloaded iOS14 this week from Apple’s Beta site to give it a spin and engage in that great parlor game of asking Siri (and Alexa and the Google Assistant) multiple questions, to see if I

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During the COVID-19 pandemic, some are trying breathwork classes to relieve anxiety

When Hermosa Beach, Calif., entrepreneur Amy Lloyd took her first breathwork class, she never expected it to make her emotional. After all, the yoga and meditation classes she regularly attends leave her feeling refreshed and rarely stir up her innermost feelings. Yet after her first class, she says, “it was like years of therapy in one session.”

If you’ve ever practiced yoga, meditation or tai chi, breathwork was almost certainly a large part of the activity. But in recent years, breathwork classes that aren’t tied to any other practice have surged in popularity, in part because they don’t require skills or experience, just the ability to do something we all do every day without much thought: breathe.

“I call it free medicine because the breath is like the Swiss Army knife of the body; there are so many different ways to use it to create a positive effect for yourself,”

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Woman who sawed off own hand found guilty of fraud

Julija Adlesic appears in court in Ljubljana, Slovenia, on Friday (AP)
Julija Adlesic appears in court in Ljubljana, Slovenia, on Friday (AP)

A Slovenian woman has been found guilty of deliberately sawing off her own hand to make a fraudulent insurance claim.

A court in Ljubljana found Julija Adlesic, 22, had taken out five insurance policies before having her left hand severed above the wrist with a circular saw.

She stood to collect more than €1m (£926,000), about half paid immediately and the rest in monthly instalments.

She was sentenced to two years in prison on Friday.

The district court said Adlesic had agreed with her boyfriend to have her hand sawed off at their home in early 2019.

Her boyfriend and his father took her to hospital after the incident, saying she had injured herself while sawing branches.

Authorities said they left the severed hand behind rather than bringing it to the hospital to ensure the disability was permanent, but

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Want to buy shares online? Here’s how to get started

<span>Photograph: Westend61/Getty Images</span>
Photograph: Westend61/Getty Images

It has been a miserable time to be a saver – interest rates, which were already poor, have fallen further since the Bank of England cut its rate to a record low. At the same time, workers lucky enough to have kept their jobs during the coronavirus pandemic have saved thousands of pounds – and now they are looking at where to put it. Total retail bank deposits in the UK have jumped by £78bn since the start of the Covid-19 crisis.

Perhaps it is no wonder that online trading in shares by small investors has taken off in recent weeks, with evidence of working-from-home employees dabbling in the markets on the side.

Hargreaves Lansdown, the biggest trading platform, reported a dramatic 221% rise in the number of trades placed between 24 March and 30 June compared with the same period last year. Interactive Investor, another of

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