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55 retailers selling cloth face masks online
55 retailers selling cloth face masks online

— Recommendations are independently chosen by Reviewed’s editors. Purchases you make through our links may earn us a commission. 

Now that we’ve adjusted to the “new normal” in the age of coronavirus (COVID-19)—and now that many states are slowly starting to open back up—staying safe as we venture out to stores, work, and doctor’s appointments is more important than ever. That’s why the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that people wear a cloth face covering to slow the spread of the virus when you’re out in public. While not as effective as a medical-grade mask or an N95 mask, these coverings provide an extra layer of protection by blocking respiratory droplets, which is the primary way that COVID-19 is transmitted.

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The demand for these cloth face coverings is

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5 Stocks Set to Rally

The coronavirus-led lockdown fueled a number of trends, one of those being the rapid shift to online shopping as brick-and-mortar stores remained shut during lockdowns.

Staying Indoors Boosts Online Shopping

The coronavirus pandemic compelled many retailers to shut down stores through March, April and May, driving the crowd to online platforms. Even though the economy is reopening, consumers continue to shop through online retail channels. This is because the lockdown measures may be easing but signs of resurgence of coronavirus and unavailability of a proper vaccine have been keeping people at home.

Moreover, e-commerce offers a lot many advantages over traditional retail. All items, from grocery, home furnishing to exotic meals, can be delivered to one’s doorstep. In fact, online channels offer greater convenience during thepandemic. Consumers do not need to worry about social distancing and avoid hassles like wearing a mask,which has been made a compulsion in brick-and-mortar stores.

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Boohoo to investigate Leicester supplier over exploitation claims

Fast fashion retailer Boohoo has said it will investigate one of its suppliers following reports that staff are earning less than the minimum wage amid unsafe working conditions.

The Sunday Times reported that workers at Jaswal Fashions in Leicester could expect to be paid £3.50 an hour.

It also saw little evidence of measures to stop the spread of coronavirus at a time when Leicester is in lockdown.

Boohoo said if the report was true, the conditions were “totally unacceptable”.

It comes as the National Crime Agency confirmed it was investigating Leicester’s textiles industry over allegations of exploitation, although it did not comment on Boohoo specifically.

An NCA spokesman said: “Within the last few days NCA officers, along with Leicestershire Police and other partner agencies, attended a number of business premises in the Leicester area to assess concerns of modern slavery and human trafficking.”

‘Immediate action’

Jaswal Fashions appears to

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The science behind why everyone is angry on Twitter on Mondays

The link between hot weather and aggressive crime is well established. But can the same be said for online aggression, such as angry tweets? And is online anger a predictor of assaults?

Our study just published suggests the answer is a clear “no.” We found angry tweet counts actually increased in cooler weather. And as daily maximum temperatures rose, angry tweet counts decreased.

We also found the incidence of angry tweets is highest on Mondays, and perhaps unsurprisingly, angry Twitter posts are most prevalent after big news events such as a leadership spill.

This is the first study to compare patterns of assault and social media anger with temperature. Given anger spreads through online communities faster than any other emotion, the findings have broad implications – especially under climate change.

[Read: Twitter wants to let you react with emoji — but why?]

A caricature of US President Donald Trump, who’s been known to fire off an angry tweet. Shutterstock
A caricature of US President Donald Trump, who’s
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Czech volunteers develop functioning lung ventilator in days

PRAGUE (AP) — Tomas Kapler knew nothing about ventilators — he’s an online business consultant, not an engineer or a medical technician. But when he saw that shortages of the vital machines had imperiled critically ill COVID-19 patients in northern Italy, he was moved to action.

“It was a disturbing feeling for me that because of a lack of equipment the doctors had to decide whether a person gets a chance to live,” Kapler said. “That seemed so horrific to me that it was an impulse to do something.”

And so he did. “I just said to myself: ‘Can we simply make the ventilators?’” he said.

Working around the clock, he brought together a team of 30 Czechs to develop a fully functional ventilator — Corovent. And they did it in a matter of days.

Kapler is a member of an informal group of volunteers formed by IT companies and

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How Miami’s seaport is surviving the loss of cruise ship business during the pandemic

Just last November, PortMiami was bustling with construction workers bringing to life five new cruise terminals and two cruise company headquarters. Future cruise business was all but guaranteed: Fiscal year 2020 was set to break the port’s 2019 record of 6.8 million passengers, up 22 percent from 2018.

The county agreed to pay $700 million toward the projects, and the cruise companies — Carnival Corporation, Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd., Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings, MSC Cruises and Virgin Voyages — agreed to repay the county $5.8 billion over the next 20 to 62 years.

In November, port director Juan Kuryla described the deals as “iron clad.” When asked by the Herald what would happen to the promised return on investment if for some reason cruise ships were only half full or if the ships did not to come to Miami at all, Kuryla said the companies would still be on the

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Make a vaccine? I’m trying to teach my kids the alphabet

By Kate Holton, Emma Thomasson and Stephen Jewkes

LONDON/BERLIN/MILAN (Reuters) – It’s tough to do any useful work when you’re stuck at home, struggling to home-school bickering kids, let alone when you’re trying to produce a COVID-19 vaccine.

British drugmaker AstraZeneca had spent years preparing for a pandemic, but when the moment finally came it was caught cold on a crucial front: stressed parents working from home struggled to focus.

    So the company recruited up to 80 teachers to run online lessons and repurposed a car parking app to book virtual classes. It also lined up personal tutoring and helped to locate some childcare spaces for those battling to adapt to the abrupt change to their lives.  

    The move by Britain’s biggest drugmaker, and similar efforts by companies the world over to host everything from magic classes to yoga for children, shows the lengths businesses are going to to help

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Broadway Star Nick Cordero Dies at 41 After Over 90 Days in Hospital from Coronavirus Complications

Broadway star Nick Cordero has died after a months-long battle with the coronavirus. He was 41.

Cordero, whose Broadway credits include Waitress and Rock of Ages, died on Sunday morning at the Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, where he had been hospitalized for over 90 days.

He is survived by his wife Amanda Kloots, whom he wed in September 2017, and their 1-year-old son Elvis Eduardo.

“God has another angel in heaven now. My darling husband passed away this morning. He was surrounded in love by his family, singing and praying as he gently left this earth. ⠀ I am in disbelief and hurting everywhere. My heart is broken as I cannot imagine our lives without him. Nick was such a bright light. He was everyone’s friend, loved to listen, help and especially talk. He was an incredible actor and musician. He loved his family and loved being

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Small businesses need ‘flexible repayment solutions’ to survive next 18 months

Photo: Dominic Lipinski/PA Wire/PA Images
Photo: Dominic Lipinski/PA Wire/PA Images

Small businesses need “flexible debt repayment schemes” in order to survive the next 18 months, a leading industry report claims.

The quarterly SME lending monitor, by online business funding marketplace Funding Xchange, highlights the need to address the stresses currently experienced by up to 40% of the businesses who have borrowed from alternative lenders.

Funding Xchange is an online portal which directs small businesses unable to access funding from their high street bank to other lending providers.

The data shows two out of every five businesses that currently have loans from “alternative lenders” are now in discussion with the lenders, as they are struggling to fulfil their repayment programmes as a result of the coronavirus lockdown impact.

“Alternative lenders” have provided another option for business who are unable to access funds from their high street bank.

They established themselves following the last financial crash, as

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Small businesses need ‘flexile repayment solutions’ to survive next 18 months

Photo: Dominic Lipinski/PA Wire/PA Images
Photo: Dominic Lipinski/PA Wire/PA Images

Small businesses need “flexible debt repayment schemes” in order to survive the next 18 months, a leading industry report claims.

The quarterly SME lending monitor, by online business funding marketplace Funding Xchange, highlights the need to address the stresses currently experienced by up to 40% of the businesses who have borrowed from alternative lenders.

Funding Xchange is an online portal which directs small businesses unable to access funding from their high street bank to other lending providers.

The data shows two out of every five businesses that currently have loans from “alternative lenders” are now in discussion with the lenders, as they are struggling to fulfil their repayment programmes as a result of the coronavirus lockdown impact.

“Alternative lenders” have provided another option for business who are unable to access funds from their high street bank.

They established themselves following the last financial crash, as

Read More