Finance

‘Bachelor’ Alex Michel Is Apparently Still Single Today

From Women’s Health

When he uttered the words, “Will you accept this rose?”Alex Michel started a sensation. As the very first Bachelor, he also forever transformed Monday nights as fans discovered the joy of following his journey to find love—and all the drama along the way.

His tenure on The Bachelor was 18 years ago. (I know, mind blown.) It’s all coming back, though, as part of ABC’s The Bachelor Greatest Of All Time. That seems like a lifetime ago, and to be sure, some recent contestants were definitely not old enough to remember Alex’s season when it aired.

In case you need a refresher on the guy who started it all, here’s what you need to know about Alex Michel as The Bachelor and everything he’s been up to the last two decades.

Alex was a ‘normal guy’ when he joined The Bachelor.

When Alex became The

Read More

‘Shocking level of bipartisan support’ means Big Tech is facing big (and costly) change

Once seen as a critical tool for internet platforms to police lewd and objectionable online speech, Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act has gained growing bipartisan support as a law in need of fixing.

Enacted in 1996, Section 230 exempts online platforms from liability for most user-generated speech. President Donald Trump has taken aim at changing the law in a fight against Twitter (TWTR), putting tech giants in legal and regulatory crosshairs that are likely to outlast the current election cycle.

Democrats and Republicans alike voice increasing antipathy over sweeping liability protections that 230 affords to all online platforms — including Facebook (FB), Instagram, YouTube (GOOG) (GOOGL). All told, experts say it’s becoming clear that change is coming.

“If Trump is reelected, frankly even if he isn’t reelected, you might see variations on this proposal coming into some type of effect next year, with a shocking level of bipartisan … Read More

Cornell pushes ahead with reopening plan

Universities are confronting the difficult decision on whether to reopen in the fall amid the coronavirus pandemic, while trying to grapple with the financial pain brought about by state lockdowns.

Cornell University, in Ithaca, N.Y., is slated to reopen its doors to around 15,000 undergraduate students on Sept. 2. To prepare, the school has spent between $3 million and $5 million on testing, tracing and isolation.

“The biggest thing that we’re going to do is to do surveillance testing,” Cornell Provost Michael Kotlikoff told Yahoo Finance’s On The Move. “We think that’s the key thing that colleges need to do to be able to assure safety in public health.” 

Identifying individuals — even those without symptoms of COVID-19 — and isolating them allows the school to control the spread of the virus, Kotlikoff said.

But testing 24,000 people (total Cornell population) individually is not an easy task — it’s expensive

Read More

How to Get More Financial Aid for College This Year

The best laid plans of the college bound often go awry.

Yes, English majors, I mangled that quote, but you get the idea: Any plans you may have made waaaay back in 2019 about attending college this fall have probably changed. You’re not alone.

Nearly half of 2020 grads say they’ve adjusted their post-high school goals as a result of the coronavirus, according to a national survey by Junior Achievement and the Project Management Institute Educational Foundation.

What does that mean for you — especially if your financial situation has changed since you sent in your college application?

We rounded up experts in personal finance and financial aid to ask them what students and their families can expect as they head off — or back — to college this fall.

One answer became clear: There is no one size fits all.

“There are 4,500 universities, and I think there’s going

Read More

What Is Yield Farming? The Rocket Fuel of DeFi, Explained

It’s effectively July 2017 in the world of decentralized finance (DeFi), and as in the heady days of the initial coin offering (ICO) boom, the numbers are only trending up.

According to DeFi Pulse, there is $1.9 billion in crypto assets locked in DeFi right now. According to the CoinDesk ICO Tracker, the ICO market started chugging past $1 billion in July 2017, just a few months before token sales started getting talked about on TV.

Debate juxtaposing these numbers if you like, but what no one can question is this: Crypto users are putting more and more value to work in DeFi applications, driven largely by the introduction of a whole new yield-generating pasture, Compound’s COMP governance token.

Governance tokens enable users to vote on the future of decentralized protocols, sure, but they also present fresh ways for DeFi founders to entice assets onto their platforms.

That said, it’s … Read More

16 Genius Things Mark Cuban Says To Do With Your Money

You might have heard this billionaire’s name, but who is Mark Cuban and how did he make his money? It’s possible you know him as one of the sharks on the hit show “Shark Tank,” but Cuban is more than just a TV personality — he’s also the owner of the Dallas Mavericks and a successful investor. In fact, Mark Cuban’s companies are so successful that he made his first million in 1990 after selling his business to CompuServe and then earned a $5.9 billion paycheck after he sold his online streaming audio service to Yahoo in 1999.

Cuban knows how to be rich and successful, and he isn’t afraid to share his insight. Check out Mark Cuban’s advice, so you can learn how to budget money and think like a billionaire.

Last updated: Oct. 3, 2019

1. Be a Little Bit of a Risk Taker

Talk to any self-made

Read More

Buy now, pay whenever? Lockdown lift for online shopping loans

By Nikhil Nainan

(Reuters) – Browsing online during lockdown, Jessica Friend spotted a pair of Ray-Ban sunglasses she liked, but the price tag made the 30-year-old Ohio resident think twice.

What persuaded her to click ‘buy’, Friend said, was the short-term credit offered by Afterpay, which split the $260 payment into four interest-free instalments.

Afterpay is among a handful of alternative credit firms which offer small loans, mostly to online shoppers, and make their money by charging merchants a 4%-6% commission.

These buy-now-pay-later (BNPL) firms have benefited from a shift to online shopping during the coronavirus crisis in countries including the United States, where state aid has also boosted retail sales.

“I’m more inclined to use them because they make it easier to afford to get the things I want all at once … and when I want to splurge on something,” Friend said of the loans.

Some investors are

Read More

Schools buy miles of plexiglass ahead of potential reopenings amid coronavirus pandemic

As millions of students return to school — be it K-12 or university — they’ll return to familiar settings in their classroom with one obvious addition: layers of plexiglass.

It remains unclear if schools — universities in particular — can reopen campuses amid a surge of coronavirus cases and new restrictions such as the 14-day quarantines demanded from those who travel from various to the tri-state area of Connecticut, New Jersey and New York.

Sheets of plexiglass would play a big role in a reopening, and schools across the country are investing in the plastic sheet to create a division in common spaces such as in libraries, classrooms — and even school buses — to defend against transmission of coronavirus.

“We’re hitting records… week in week out, at this point from a sales perspective,” Ryan Schroeder, CEO of Plaskolite, one of the country’s biggest plexiglass makers, told Yahoo Finance. “Orders

Read More

Coronavirus pandemic may lead to couples putting off divorce, survey finds

Getty Images/iStockphoto
Getty Images/iStockphoto

The coronavirus pandemic could lead to married couples who were previously considering divorce to delay proceedings, a survey has suggested.

In April, YouGov carried out a poll of more than 1,000 adults across the UK who had previously been divorced.

The participants were asked whether the virus outbreak would influence their decision to divorce their partner.

Of the respondents, 28 per cent said they would be less likely to pursue divorce due to the Covid-19 crisis.

A small percentage (6 per cent) said that the pandemic would make them feel more inclined to go through divorce proceedings, while the rest said it would either not be a factor in their decision or they did not know if it would be.

The survey of 1,005 adults, which was conducted for family law firm Ampla Finance, also find a marked difference between the way in which women and men felt

Read More

Dave Nadig Breaks Thematic ETFs Success On Yahoo Finance

This article was originally published on ETFTrends.com.

Total ETF flows are $202 billion year-to-date through the end of June. June alone saw $58.5 billion. The story has remained the huge numbers going into bonds. ETF Trends Director of Research and CIO Dave Nadig joins Yahoo Finance’s Sibile Marcellus on “The Ticker” to breakdown the ETFs to watch in the second half of 2020.

Keeping bonds in mind, $31 billion went into US fixed income (and $11 billion into U.S. equities). Some of that is the Fed, as it has purchased $6.8 billion worth of corporate bond ETFs year-to-date, and other investors have been piling on behind them. 

As Nadig points out, the Big Winners here have been the Vanguard Intermediate Corporate ETF (VCIT), which pulled in $5.7 billion in June, and the iShares iBoxx USD Investment Grade ETF (LQD), which had $3.5 billion in inflows.  

Read More