Personal

Customer Pulls Out BB-Gun; 24 Golf Carts Damaged At Club: Blotter

GLENVIEW, IL — The following information comes from the Glenview Police Department (unless otherwise noted) and court records as a record of police activity, including incidents reported by the public and those arrested by police. Criminal charges represent accusations by the state and are often dropped or reduced. Updated information may be available from the Cook County Clerk of the Circuit Court.

Every person arrested is presumed innocent unless proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt in a court of law.

ARRESTS

NO VALID DRIVER’S LICENSE

Felipe Contreras, 46, of the 9500 block of Sumac Road, Des Plaines, is accused of not having a valid driver’s license, and was arrested at 7:50 a.m. Sept. 9 after a traffic crash investigation in the 1300 block of Waukegan Road. He was released on $2,500 bond, and assigned a court date of Sept. 25.

RETAIL THEFT

Fernando Mendoza, 36, of the 800 block of

Read More

Customs seizes 500,000 faulty N95 masks in Chicago en route from China to New Jersey

U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers seized 500,000 faulty N95 masks headed to New Jersey from Schenzhen, China, after they were found to be less than 95% effective.

The seizure, worth an estimated $3 million, was made in Chicago last week when Homeland Security asked the CBP’s Anti-Terrorism Contraband Enforcement Team in the Windy City to apprehend and inspect the shipment, CBP said in a statement.

Thirty of the masks were inspected at a U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention facility, which found that 10% of the respirators tested had a filter efficiency rating below 95%, CBP said in a statement last Thursday.

While the suggested retail price was just under $500,000, the potential retail sales value was more like $3 million due to demand, CBP said.

Despite a push for more personal protective equipment, there is still a shortage of the highly refined N-95 masks in the U.S.

Read More

One in nine pupils absent from school as lack of testing drives fears of ‘lockdown by default’

Absence rate more than double pre-Covid times last Thursday (Oli Scarff/AFP via Getty Images)
Absence rate more than double pre-Covid times last Thursday (Oli Scarff/AFP via Getty Images)

More than one in nine pupils were absent from school last week, government figures show, as teachers and unions warned a lack of available coronavirus tests meant more schools would be forced to close, leading to “lockdown by default”.

After schools reopened in England following six months of closure during the pandemic, education secretary Gavin Williamson touted the fact that 99.9 per cent of schools were open to at least some pupils.

But absence rates were more than double that of pre-Covid times, with Department for Education (DfE) statistics suggesting 12 per cent of pupils were not in attendance on 10 September.

Some 92 per cent of state schools were fully open, the DfE estimates, providing face-to-face teaching for pupils all day with no groups self-isolating. In these schools, 90 per cent of pupils were in

Read More

Apple Fitness+ subscription service unveiled alongside Series 6 Watch

Apple has unveiled a new personalised workout subscription service alongside new smartwatches and tablet computers.

Fitness+ collects health data gathered by an Apple Watch and then displays it alongside workout videos shown on a larger display.

The platform will compete with existing fitness apps on iOS from Peloton, Les Mills and Fiit.

It also poses a challenge to Fitbit, whose wearables benefit from their own health-coaching subscription service.

As many had forecast, Apple decided to hold back details of its next iPhones for a separate event.

Yoga and dance

Like some of its rivals, Fitness+ also allows competitive users to see how their own efforts compare with others who have completed the same fitness routine previously.

“Health-tracking continues to be a major focus for Apple, and its new Fitness+ service signals its intent to generate more revenue from its products in this area,” commented Leo Gebbie from the consultancy CCS

Read More

7 Tips to Keep Your Kids Safe Online During Remote Learning

You can’t supervise them 24/7. Here are easy ways to make sure they’re protected on their own.

Boy on Laptop
Boy on Laptop

Virtual learning means more time on the web, which means a greater need for cyber safety lessons.

iStock

This back-to-school season looks a little different in much of the country. With over 6 million kids distance learning, working families are met with an entirely new set of challenges. With kids on the computer for several hours a day—and working parents not able to give their full supervision—cyber safety is a concern now more than ever. Here are seven top tips on how to keep your child safe online from cybersecurity company NortonLifeLock.

Check your surroundings: With children remotely attending school through Zoom and the like, families now have multiple surveillance cameras throughout the house, potentially making their homes far less private than they might otherwise be. If your child

Read More

‘I’m Making a Personal Request’

Liz Porter

Grammy-award winning artist Sheryl Crow is a breast cancer survivor. She was diagnosed in 2006, and since being in remission, has worked to raise awareness about the importance of early detection.

Life looks very different right now. In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, we’ve had to adjust to quarantine or step up to serve our communities as essential workers. And many of us are struggling with the impact of these changes – especially women, who are experiencing an increased burden, as we have been required to take on even more stress and responsibility in our home and professional lives.

Times like these remind us what’s really important in life – love, family and living life in harmony. Like many of you, I’ve been home over the past few months – helping my sons navigate online schooling and generally looking for ways to find peace and joy amidst

Read More

Church & Dwight (CHD) Gains on High Demand & Online Strength

Church & Dwight Co., Inc. CHD appears to be in a decent spot amid the otherwise jeopardized economy, owing to the coronavirus outbreak. The company’s shares have rallied 31.8% so far this year, outperforming the industry’s growth of 11.5%. Markedly, this manufacturer of household, personal care and specialty products has been benefiting from rising demand for essentials amid the pandemic.

Apart from this, Church & Dwight’s online business and brand enhancement endeavors through innovation and acquisitions have been bolstering its growth. Let’s delve deeper into the factors boosting this Zacks Rank #3 (Hold) company and helping it battle escalated costs.

You can see the complete list of today’s Zacks #1 Rank (Strong Buy) stocks here.

Factors Adding Spark to Church & Dwight

The company’s second-quarter 2020 results gained from the robust household and personal care businesses owing to consumers’ shifted preference for essential products amid the coronavirus outbreak. In this

Read More

As more schools shift to online learning, what should they do about cyberattacks?

PATERSON, N.J. — Some New Jersey students got a lesson in the pitfalls of virtual learning recently when their online classes were interrupted by obscenities, pornography and threats against teachers.

But the Paterson schools aren’t alone in dealing with electronic intrusions in the age of virtual learning. Similar incidents have been reported in districts across the country, from California, Miami and Ohio to Lumberton, New Jersey, which was bombarded with pornographic images and racist language during Zoom conferences in April.

Problems with online security and privacy — from student pranks to ransomware attacks — are expected to only get worse as schools across the country shift to full- or part-time virtual learning because of the coronavirus pandemic, experts warn.

“Zoom bombing, cyberbullying, phishing – you name it. It has increased astronomically. Everybody needs to be really mindful about security right now,” said Kutub Thakur, an assistant professor and director of

Read More

Yes on Prop. 24. It’s not perfect, but it would improve online privacy

Alastair Mactaggart, left, shown with Assemblyman Ed Chau (D-Arcadia), is a leading proponent of Proposition 24, an initiative to strengthen California's online privacy law. <span class="copyright">(Rich Pedroncelli / Associated Press)</span>
Alastair Mactaggart, left, shown with Assemblyman Ed Chau (D-Arcadia), is a leading proponent of Proposition 24, an initiative to strengthen California’s online privacy law. (Rich Pedroncelli / Associated Press)

Over the last decade, personal data has become the invisible currency that funds much of the internet. Social networks, sites and apps attract people with free content and services, then use the data they gather to make a fortune off of targeted advertisements.

Two years ago, the Legislature passed a groundbreaking law to give Californians more control over the personal information collected from them online. The idea was to let you withdraw from that hidden exchange of information, barring sites from selling your data to third parties that assemble detailed profiles of consumers’ habits and tastes.

Unfortunately, the California Consumer Privacy Act, which went into effect this year, didn’t live up to its billing. Major online companies found ways to wriggle

Read More

22 Awkward Social Situations You Might Experience During COVID-19 & How to Deal

After months of stay-at-home orders, many places are reopening now, and more people are venturing outside. Depending on your state, county, and city, you might be able to dine out at restaurants, order drinks at a bar, get your hair cut, and even go to a theme park in a few weeks.

This reopening and loosening of restrictions can cause a lot of conflicting feelings. You could be firmly on the excited side, happy to visit your favorite neighborhood spots and see friends again. Or you could be in the anxious camp, unsure that these reopenings are wise and still worried about health and safety conditions at those favorite neighborhood spots. Or you could waffle between the two sides, depending on the day, what news you’ve read, and your desire to both see your friends and family but also keep them safe.

It’s okay to have those feelings. We are

Read More