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These big brands actually make costco’s Kirkland products

When Costco customers see the red and black Kirkland Signature label, they know they’re going to get a good product at a great price. But they don’t always know who’s making it.

Store brand products like Kirkland are typically manufactured by third parties, not the store itself. Many of these behind-the-scenes companies are actually famous retail titans, so you can save big on your grocery bill without losing quality.

While plenty of the names behind Kirkland Signature products are public knowledge — some printed right on the box — others remain a closely guarded secret. More than a few rumors have popped up from people claiming to be in the know.

Here are the names we can confirm and the myths we can debunk, assuming no recent supplier swaps:

Confirmed.

Websites including Dog Food Insider claim that Kirkland Signature Dog Food is actually manufactured by Diamond Pet Foods, also known … Read More

Big Tech’s China Face-Off Presages an Exodus From Hong Kong

(Bloomberg) — Facebook Inc., Google and Twitter Inc. — all of which are blocked in the mainland — are now headed toward a showdown with China that could end up making Hong Kong feel more like Beijing.

Hours after Hong Kong announced sweeping new powers to police the internet on Monday night, those companies plus the likes of Microsoft Corp. and Zoom Video Communications Inc. all suspended requests for data from the Hong Kong government. ByteDance Ltd.’s TikTok, which has Chinese owners, announced it would pull its viral video app from the territory’s mobile stores in the coming days even as President Donald Trump threatened to ban it in the U.S.

Their dilemma is stark: Bend to the law and infuriate Western nations increasingly at odds with China over political freedoms, or simply refuse and depart like Google did in China a decade ago over some of the very same

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Big Tech’s China Face-Off Risks Sparking Exodus From Hong Kong

(Bloomberg) — Facebook Inc., Google and Twitter Inc. — all of which are blocked in the mainland — are now headed toward a showdown with China that could end up making Hong Kong feel more like Beijing.

Hours after Hong Kong announced sweeping new powers to police the internet on Monday night, those companies plus the likes of Microsoft Corp. and Zoom Video Communications Inc. all suspended requests for data from the Hong Kong government. ByteDance Ltd.’s TikTok, which has Chinese owners, announced it would pull its viral video app from the territory’s mobile stores in the coming days even as President Donald Trump threatened to ban it in the U.S.

Their dilemma is stark: Bend to the law and infuriate Western nations increasingly at odds with China over political freedoms, or simply refuse and depart like Google did in China a decade ago over some of the very same

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10 Chicago Insurtech Firms That Could Win Big At The Benzinga Fintech Awards

Of all the opportunities in fintech, insurance technology might be the biggest. The $1-trillion insurance sector has remained stagnant for decades, but a few companies in Chicago are making tremendous plays to shake it up. 

These 10 insurtech companies from the Windy City are top candidates for success at this year’s Benzinga Global Fintech Awards

Convr: Manual underwriting tasks can be take a toll on administrative time and resources. Convr aims to solve this problem by creating software that leverages data science and artificial intelligence for feasible commercial underwriting.

The goal is to assist commercial insurers in providing customers with quick and accurate service while enhancing productivity and cutting out unnecessary losses. 

Convr offers solutions for mid-market and small business underwriting by reducing the loss ratio by up to one point, providing world-class customer experiences and leverage thousands of data sources, according to the company. 

Kin: Home

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‘Shocking level of bipartisan support’ means Big Tech is facing big (and costly) change

Once seen as a critical tool for internet platforms to police lewd and objectionable online speech, Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act has gained growing bipartisan support as a law in need of fixing.

Enacted in 1996, Section 230 exempts online platforms from liability for most user-generated speech. President Donald Trump has taken aim at changing the law in a fight against Twitter (TWTR), putting tech giants in legal and regulatory crosshairs that are likely to outlast the current election cycle.

Democrats and Republicans alike voice increasing antipathy over sweeping liability protections that 230 affords to all online platforms — including Facebook (FB), Instagram, YouTube (GOOG) (GOOGL). All told, experts say it’s becoming clear that change is coming.

“If Trump is reelected, frankly even if he isn’t reelected, you might see variations on this proposal coming into some type of effect next year, with a shocking level of bipartisan … Read More

Mexican Retailers See Big Losses, Discounts in Virus Aftermath

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MEXICO CITY Mexican retailers face sales declines of up to 70 percent this year as COVID-19 continues to rip through Latin America’s second-largest economy with no signs of easing.

“We have started to reopen in phases, but there is still a lot of uncertainty,” said Marcela Muñoz, a retail analyst with Vector Casa de Bolsa brokerage, adding that leading department stores such as Liverpool or El Palacio de Hierro have been hit hard by the pandemic.

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“Department store sales declined 50 percent last month on a same-store basis and they had to stay closed in April and May,” said Muñoz. She added that May turnover recovered compared to April, when it fell 73 percent.

Sales are also expected to gradually increase this month as the government allowed some retailers to resume operations this week after three months of lockdowns.

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Tim Gunn and Heidi Klum Took That Big Amazon Money and Ran with It

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At one point in the development of “Making the Cut” with Amazon Prime Video, executive producer and host Heidi Klum decided to ask the online retail behemoth if they could have a jet for the show.

Not some dinky Gulfstream, mind you. Like…a jet jet. A real, big jet.

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“We were kind of hoping to get a big Amazon plane, because I was already thinking about commercials we can shoot — like Tim [Gunn] and I hopping out of a plane with Amazon boxes, delivering them to people,” Klum said in an interview with IndieWire. “My brain was going 100 miles an hour. A plane would have been nice with sewing machines in there, like ‘OK, your first assignment is not in New York, it’s in Paris. But guess what?’ You open a plane, they go in there, and there

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Setting Money Goals at Milestone Birthdays, and Bagging Big Bucks with Bank Bonuses

Welcome to NerdWallet’s SmartMoney podcast, where we answer your real-world money questions.

This week’s episode starts with a discussion about “big birthdays.” A milestone birthday can start you thinking about what you’ve done with your life and where you want to go in the future. Setting new money goals may help you achieve some of those dreams.

Then we pivot to this week’s question from Austin, who says: “I keep seeing advertisements for sign-up bonuses when you join a new bank. And I’m wondering if they’re actually legit. Can I really get a couple hundred bucks for ‘free’ by making a new bank account?”

Some banks will give you money — often $200 or even more — to entice you to open a bank account. You will have to jump through some hoops, though. For checking accounts, you’ll typically need to set up direct deposit of a certain amount, such … Read More

Accenture is laying people off as Wall Street braces for big cuts next year

 

Welcome to Wall Street Insider, where we take you behind the scenes of the finance team’s biggest scoops and deep dives from the past week. 

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Accenture is cutting US staff, and top execs just warned of more pain to come as the consulting giant promotes fewer people and looks to control costs, Meghan Morris and Dakin Campbell first reported. Their story got a lot of attention this week, and for good reason. It could be an indicator for how the firm’s own clients are weathering a downturn, and consulting likely won’t be the only industry to feel the crunch.

We also took a look at who’s most at risk once Wall Street kicks off the tidal wave of layoffs many banks had put on pause — and why boutique firms without a strong restructuring practice

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As Big Deals Make the Rounds at the Cannes Market, a Pandemic Era of Dealmaking Takes Shape

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When this year’s Cannes market migrated online, some worried that it might have a negative impact on the business. As it turns out, it’s a lot easier to close international pre-sales when jumping from meeting to meeting means logging into various Zoom rooms, rather than squeezing through throngs of people on the Croisette. Agents and buyers say that while nothing can compare to in-person meetings at Cannes, this week’s virtual markets were productive and offered a blueprint for pandemic-era dealmaking.

In fact, if the Cannes markets are any indication, buyers are hungry for big deals, despite the uncertainty that surrounds whether audiences are comfortable returning to theaters.

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While the the country’s three largest circuits all plan to reopen all their locations in July, Warner Bros. this week pushed back for a second time the summer’s highest-profile film, Christopher Nolan’s “Tenet,”

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