Changing

Eyes On A Changing World, Indiana Kelley Strives For Greater Diversity

It’s not about doing more. It’s also about doing more, more successfully.

That’s what Idie Kesner, dean of the Kelley School of Business at Indiana University, says of the school’s recent efforts to increase diversity in its student and faculty ranks. They are pronounced efforts — but despite having launched more than 100 initiatives in recent years aimed at broadening the school’s appeal to under-represented minorities and women, Kesner and Kelley aren’t done. This summer and fall, as the country reeled from waves of racial unrest, the Kelley School — one of the founding members of the groundbreaking civil rights-era Consortium for Graduate Study in Management — launched two major undertakings: a committee of students, faculty, and staff with a mandate to examine the B-school’s systems for issues of inequity and make recommendations to address them; and The Commons, a sort of monthly community-wide roundtable for discussions about diversity, equity,

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Car Buying is Changing and All It Took Was a Pandemic: The Enlightenment

Photo credit: Illustration by Marcos Chin - Car and Driver
Photo credit: Illustration by Marcos Chin – Car and Driver

From Car and Driver

For ages, car dealers have stacked the deck against buyers. They’ve squelched competition with state laws that their lobbyists helped craft. They’ve fought attempts to share financial information with buyers, making negotiating unpleasant and difficult. Many of them won’t even answer a simple email.

In the past decade, car dealers have haltingly, begrudgingly embraced changes in the retail landscape brought on by the internet. And that slow play would have continued but for a fat little microorganism that traveled the globe earlier this year and disrupted everything. The COVID-19 shutdowns this spring forced dealers to do something they’d been putting off: embrace technology and put buyers first.

“People’s expectations changed overnight,” said Larry Dominique, chairman and CEO of PSA North America, which is in the process of relaunching the Peugeot brand in the U.S. and Canada

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How the coronavirus is changing the influencer business, according to marketers and top creators on Instagram and YouTube

Macy Mariano. 

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Macy Mariano.
  • Marketers and digital creators are adjusting to changes in the influencer-marketing industry as the coronavirus continues to spread globally.

  • As with most businesses in the ad industry, professionals have trimmed budgets, canceled events, and looked for alternative revenue streams.

  • Several months in, brand deals are slowly starting to trickle back and creators are adjusting to a new normal in their careers. 

  • Business Insider spoke with influencer-marketing professionals across the industry to better understand how they are adjusting their businesses to continue to earn a living during the coronavirus pandemic and the resulting economic turmoil. 

  • Subscribe to Business Insider’s influencer newsletter.

This post will be added to when new information becomes available and was last updated on September 1.

As the near-term effects of the coronavirus outbreak continue to be felt across the global economy, businesses and creators in the influencer-marketing industry

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How COVID-19 Is Changing the Way Families Save for College Costs

<strong>Ryan Ermey</strong>: With the fall semester fast approaching, the COVID-19 pandemic has cast a shadow of uncertainty over higher education. Kevin Walker of CollegeFinance.com joins us for a discussion of how the landscape has changed for colleges, students, and parents alike in our main segment. On today’s show, Sandy and I talk tax refund delays and answer reader mail about how to pay for a new home in retirement. That’s all ahead on this episode of Your Money’s Worth. Stick around.

<strong>Ryan Ermey</strong>: Welcome to Your Money’s Worth. I’m Kiplinger’s associate editor Ryan Ermey joined as always by senior editor Sandy Block. And we’re talking tax refunds here in the first segment, Sandy. My question to you to kick things off is did you get your refund?

<strong>Sandy Block</strong>: I owed the IRS. So to me, this is a nice problem to have. But here’s the deal, the deadline for … Read More

Here’s how the pandemic is changing summer wedding plans

Couples that were planning to marry in 2020 have had to contend with a unique type of wedding planning stress.

The coronavirus has derailed plans and forced couples to reimagine their big celebrations. But engaged couples and newlyweds have shown that COVID-19 is no match for love and they are finding creative ways to wed under the constraints of the pandemic.

Scaling down in-person events, bisecting wedding ceremonies from receptions, and incorporating video conferencing so the occasion can be digitally shared to those far and wide are some of the emerging trends from the wedding industry.

Cashay editor Janna Herron sat down with Yahoo Money and Cashay reporter Stephanie Asymkos to discuss the trends and outlook in the latest episode of the Money, Honestly podcast. Their conversation is based on Stephanie’s Yahoo Money and Cashay reporting.

Seventy-six percent of summer weddings in 2020 are still happening in one way or another. (Photo: Getty)
Seventy-six percent of summer weddings in 2020 are still happening in one way or
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Black, female entrepreneurs are changing Silicon Valley

SAN FRANCISCO – In the early days of Zume Pizza, visitors to Julia Collins’ robotic food prep company in Silicon Valley would greet her at the door and say, “Can you grab me a water? I’m here to meet with the founder.” When pitching her business to investment partners at venture capital firms, Collins was nearly always the only woman and always the only black person in the room.

Then, late last year, a hairline crack surfaced in the invisible yet seemingly impenetrable barrier that limits black women’s access to the tech world. A $375 million investment gave Zume Pizza a valuation of $2.25 billion.

It wasn’t just the company she co-founded that reached unicorn status. Collins did, too, as the first black woman whose tech company is valued at $1 billion or more by investors. Now that she’s working on a new startup in regenerative agriculture, investors are calling

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How the coronavirus is changing the influencer business, according to marketers and top Instagram and YouTube stars

Macy Mariano.
Macy Mariano.

Macy Mariano.

  • Marketers and digital creators are adjusting to rapid changes in the influencer-marketing industry as the coronavirus continues to spread globally.

  • As with most businesses in the ad industry, professionals are trimming budgets, canceling events, and looking for alternative revenue streams.

  • Business Insider spoke with influencer-marketing professionals across the industry to better understand how they are adjusting their businesses to continue to earn a living during the coronavirus pandemic and the resulting economic turmoil. 

  • Subscribe to Business Insider’s influencer newsletter: Influencer Dashboard.

This post will be added to when new information becomes available and was last updated on July 9, 2020.

As the near-term effects of the coronavirus outbreak continue to be felt across the global economy, businesses and creators in the influencer-marketing industry are doing their best to adapt.

Influencers have seen some of their sponsorship deals shut down and events cancelled, with many shifting their

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Why Investors Should Keep an Eye on Changing Sales Strategies

In the first half of 2020, most car manufacturers are seeing decreased sales.

General Motors (NYSE:GM) recorded a 7% decrease in total vehicle sales in the U.S. during the first quarter of 2020 compared to the year-ago quarter, with sales falling 34% year over year in the second quarter. Ford (NYSE:F) saw a 21% decline in wholesales and a 15% decline in revenue year over year in the first quarter, with sales falling by a third in the second quarter compared to the prior-year quarter. Fiat Chrysler (NYSE:FCAU) reported a 15% decrease in revenue in the first quarter compared to the prior-year quarter. Even Tesla’s (NASDAQ:TSLA) second-quarter deliveries fell 4.9% compared to the year-ago quarter, despite the much-awaited opening of its Shanghai Gigafactory.

One reason for the decreased sales is likely lower income from high unemployment numbers. However, another big contributor is the fact that most car sales are made

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Unrest Is Changing the Way Americans Spend Money

(Bloomberg) — The back-to-back shocks of a deadly virus, lockdowns and civil unrest have a growing number of Americans reevaluating not just their life priorities, but also how — or even, if — they’ll spend their money.

Good.Must.Grow, a Los Angeles-based firm, said its Conscious Consumer Spending Index, which tracks expected purchases of socially responsible brands, suddenly rebounded after trending down since 2017, jumping 15% in May from the previous study in November. Asked what criteria would influence their post-pandemic spending, almost 70% of respondents cited a company’s ability to make a positive impact on society and the environment. The firm polled more than 1,000 Americans. 

“The environmental crisis has become better understood by more people in recent years,” said the consultancy’s founder, Heath Shackleford. “You layer on what’s happening with Covid, with George Floyd and all these things — I think we’re going to see a bigger piece of

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Life Insurance Application Procedures Changing Amid the Pandemic

While life insurance coverage is still widely available amid the COVID-19 pandemic, some insurers are adjusting certain processes to accommodate the new norms created by social distancing.

Life insurance applicants have traditionally been required to pass a physical exam to get a policy. However, the need for social distancing due to the pandemic has led some insurers to begin offering significant levels of coverage without an exam. That was one of the findings of a recent conversation ValuePenguin had with two life insurance brokers from The Robinson Financial Group, a financial services company based in Skokie, Ill.

That sentiment was underscored by a recent survey by LIMRA, a membership group for insurance and financial services organizations. LIMRA found that insurers were implementing ways to do business while cutting down on face-to-face interactions throughout the entire underwriting process.

Implementing new procedures

With COVID-19 sickening millions of people across the globe and

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