childrens

UK parents take control of their children’s education as the homeschooling option becomes the answer to classroom coronavirus fears

Leo and Espen are assisted by their mother Moira as they homeschool and navigate online learning resources provided by their infant school in the village of Marsden, northern England, on March 23, 2020 

<p class=Oli Scarff/AFP via Getty Images

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Leo and Espen are assisted by their mother Moira as they homeschool and navigate online learning resources provided by their infant school in the village of Marsden, northern England, on March 23, 2020
  • Homeschooling is on the rise in the UK as uncertainties around the reopening of schools has left some parents feeling like they need to take matters into their own hands.

  • A recent poll found that 30% of UK parents were not planning to send their children back to school, of which 91% said they would continue with homeschooling for the foreseeable future.

  • Reasons for homeschooling vary, whether its fears that schools aren’t opening or because children find it easier to work from home.

  • Professional tutoring and homeschooling groups have also seen a rise in interest, with one group telling Business Insider that there’s been

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How the U.S. seeks to protect children’s privacy online

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – TikTok is under investigation for allegedly violating a settlement reached with U.S. authorities last year that resolved charges the popular app broke rules governing how children’s personal information is treated online.

The U.S. Federal Trade Commission, which enforces the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act, or COPPA, and the Justice Department, which often files court actions for the FTC, have opened a preliminary investigation into the matter involving the China-based video-sharing app.

Under rules dating to 1998 legislation, COPPA requires websites to get parental permission to collect data on children under the age of 13. Websites or online services are also expected to ban third parties from collecting the data.

COPPA also applies to mobile apps, gaming platforms and internet-connected toys, among others.

Under pressure from the FTC, TikTok, owned by China’s ByteDance, agreed in early 2019 to pay a $5.7 million civil penalty for violating COPPA by

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