classes

Facing Monday deadline, New York City will again delay start of in-person classes

Burdened by staffing shortages, building ventilation issues and last-minute changes to instructional plans, New York City’s schools will delay bringing back students for in-person instruction — again.

Now, students attending school with a mix of in-person and at-home learning will return to their buildings in phases: Monday for special education and pre-kindergarten students, Sept. 29 for elementary students and Oct. 1 for middle and high school students, the United Federation of Teachers confirmed Thursday.

About 42% of New York children have elected to learn from home full-time, a number that’s increased from 37% in the two weeks since Mayor Bill de Blasio and the city’s teachers union reached the original deal to push back the start of school, from Sept. 10 to Monday. 

The chaotic situation has demonstrated just how hard it is to reopen urban school systems during a pandemic. Among the 20 largest school systems in the U.S.,

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During the COVID-19 pandemic, some are trying breathwork classes to relieve anxiety

When Hermosa Beach, Calif., entrepreneur Amy Lloyd took her first breathwork class, she never expected it to make her emotional. After all, the yoga and meditation classes she regularly attends leave her feeling refreshed and rarely stir up her innermost feelings. Yet after her first class, she says, “it was like years of therapy in one session.”

If you’ve ever practiced yoga, meditation or tai chi, breathwork was almost certainly a large part of the activity. But in recent years, breathwork classes that aren’t tied to any other practice have surged in popularity, in part because they don’t require skills or experience, just the ability to do something we all do every day without much thought: breathe.

“I call it free medicine because the breath is like the Swiss Army knife of the body; there are so many different ways to use it to create a positive effect for yourself,”

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You can skip classes (or meetings) with this TikTok fake sound, but some schools are facing real challenges

Say you’re a high school student attending class online when the teacher calls on you with a tough question.

You don’t know the answer and you don’t want to look dumb. What do you do?

Some kids with smartphones are trying an easy dodge. They cue up a video that plays the sound of a garbled Zoom call so it seems like they tried to answer – but there’s a technical glitch.

Kids have been sharing the videos on TikTok, a social media app popular with students.

The videos sound like the voices of the parents on the old Peanuts cartoons. They even come with garbled voices that sound low and high to accommodate both male and female voices. 

One such video has been seen by more than 7 million users and shared almost 100,000 times.

“It’s not surprising because kids do this in school, too,” said Anna Ball, a

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Make This Simple Form Tweak To See Better Results From Barre Classes

Photo credit: Christian Lantry - Getty Images
Photo credit: Christian Lantry – Getty Images

From Women’s Health

When I first heard the term “barre class” a couple years ago, I was immediately transported back to my days as a baby ballerina, when time at the barre meant pliés, stretches that made my hamstrings feel like they were on fire, and a whole lot of fancy footwork.

My ballet career was short, to say the least. (I tossed my ballet shoes after age seven.) So I was skeptical about a whole fitness class centered around, what I remembered as, the worst part of ballet lessons. (Just being honest here.)

Fast-forward to my first session at Pure Barre—a fitness studio built entirely around the barre—after my roommate at the time assured me it was an amazing workout. I was reluctant at first, but I left the class feeling like every tiny muscle in my core, butt, arms, and legs

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Fall college classes kick off with COVID-19 warnings, miles of Plexiglas

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. – After months of planning and preparation for a new semester under the coronavirus pandemic, Molly Coomes was nearly as eager as Purdue University officials to resume in-person classes this week.

Some of the details, though, would still have to be worked out.

As the masked sophomore, coffee in hand, headed to her first class on the West Lafayette, Indiana, campus where masks are mandatory and lecture halls are socially distanced, she realized her mistake.

“I thought, ‘Why did I do that?’” Coomes said of the coffee. “I can’t take a drink, because I feel like taking a mask off is like breaking a law around here.”

Things didn’t get any easier in class, which was interrupted by technical issues that crisscrossed the campus. Then her professor acknowledged that he was in the vulnerable age range for COVID-19, asking his students, Coomes said, “Please don’t kill him.”

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‘Zoombombers’ using porn to disrupt online classes as young as kindergarten across US

Online learning is in full swing as students across the U.S. return to class during the coronavirus pandemic.

Navigating this new normal has come with challenges, however, amid reports of hackers hijacking virtual lessons to troll students with illicit images, messages and threats.

“While we were waiting for everything to start, all of a sudden it began,” Ariela Colon of Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, said of the moment her daughter’s kindergarten orientation was “Zoombombed” on Thursday. She told WYOU-TV they heard a man’s voice using racial slurs and cursing.

“Then they started messaging us in the chat saying that he was going to rape our children and dropping the F bomb and talking about Mexicans,” Colon told the news station. “My daughter was like, ‘What’s going on mom? Why is my school doing that?’ I had to send her away.”

Schools have seen increased instances of “Zoombombing,” which occurs when hackers

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Master Microsoft Teams and Outlook with these super cheap online classes

Master Microsoft Teams and Outlook with these super cheap online classes
Master Microsoft Teams and Outlook with these super cheap online classes

TL;DR: Boost your business’s productivity with the Essential 2020 Microsoft Teams Training Course for $19.99, an 88% savings as of Aug. 23.

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the way we work forever. With many companies and organizations realizing the merits of working remotely, the use of collaboration apps has definitely spiked — and Microsoft Teams is at the forefront.

Microsoft notes that they’ve seen a daily record of 2.7 billion meeting minutes a day, a massive 200 percent increase from the previous record of 900 million. It’s no wonder why — the platform has everything you need for collaboration. It can function as a workplace chat, a teleconferencing app, file storage, app integration, and so much more. But with its myriad of features, it can be difficult to navigate, especially for a newbie.

Enter: the Essential 2020 Microsoft Teams

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MassBay Adds Fully Remote Classes For High School Students

WELLESLEY, MA — MassBay Community College has added seven online and remotely-formatted courses this fall to be offered for high school students, exclusively. The courses include Medical Terminology, Drugs and Society, Law and Society, Entrepreneurship, Security Awareness, Environmental Studies I, and Intro to Communication. High school students can also enroll in other MassBay courses or apply for dual enrollment courses.

“Due to the coronavirus, many high school students and their families have been contacting us to learn about all available options for fall courses, wanting to add to their high school course selection. Taking one or more college-level courses is a great way for high school students to jumpstart their college education,” said Interim Vice President of Enrollment Management, Alison McCarty. “High school students have the opportunity to earn college credits at an affordable price, and possibly find a career path that interests them. We hope by adding classes specifically

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What will student protests look like when classes are online?

<span class=This fall will see a change in the ways college students participate in campus activism, experts suggest. Maddie Meyer / Staff/GettyImages” src=”https://s.yimg.com/ny/api/res/1.2/xU4GO5UTDI4onywydaPFNw–/YXBwaWQ9aGlnaGxhbmRlcjt3PTk2MDtoPTY0NC42NjY2NjY2NjY2NjY2/https://s.yimg.com/uu/api/res/1.2/HYY6SFM7ScrvDqLSFT.c7g–~B/aD05Njc7dz0xNDQwO3NtPTE7YXBwaWQ9eXRhY2h5b24-/https://media.zenfs.com/en/the_conversation_us_articles_815/e84a43c783bd1d745a35b2c342b4428a” data-src=”https://s.yimg.com/ny/api/res/1.2/xU4GO5UTDI4onywydaPFNw–/YXBwaWQ9aGlnaGxhbmRlcjt3PTk2MDtoPTY0NC42NjY2NjY2NjY2NjY2/https://s.yimg.com/uu/api/res/1.2/HYY6SFM7ScrvDqLSFT.c7g–~B/aD05Njc7dz0xNDQwO3NtPTE7YXBwaWQ9eXRhY2h5b24-/https://media.zenfs.com/en/the_conversation_us_articles_815/e84a43c783bd1d745a35b2c342b4428a”/
This fall will see a change in the ways college students participate in campus activism, experts suggest. Maddie Meyer / Staff/GettyImages

Editor’s note: Campus protests have become a mainstay in American higher education in recent years. But now that many colleges and universities will be conducting classes online due to COVID-19, the nature of college protests is likely to change. That’s according to Sam Abrams, professor of political science at Sarah Lawrence College; Jonathan Flowers, a visiting assistant philosophy professor at Worcester State University; and April Logan, professor of English literature at Salisbury University, who shared their views in the following Q&A.

How might campus protests be different this fall?

<span class=Sam Abrams is a professor of political science at Sarah Lawrence College and a visiting fellow
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The 20 Best Online Cooking Classes That’ll Take You From Novice Chef to At-Home Pro

You don’t need to leave your home to learn how to cook, the best online cooking classes can teach you everything you need to know. Whether you don’t know how to chop vegetables or you’re trying to become the next contestant on Netflix’s Sugar Rush, you can learn both basic and advanced skills online. Even peeling garlic can be intimidating, and these classes break it down for you in the safety of your own kitchen. If you mess up, no one will know. That’s the best part about online learning vs. going in-person to a class.

The classes use videos or step-by-step written instructions and photos to help you master recipes and techniques. We found 20 different sites that offer comprehensive cooking classes, from learning how to poach eggs to creating an awe-inspiring cake that even the Cake Boss would be envious of. Speaking of professional and celebrity chefs, you

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