Coronavirus

5 Growth-Focused Cloud Stocks to Buy Amid Coronavirus Crisis

The cloud computing space is benefiting from the changing consumer preference amid the coronavirus crisis. Cloud-based solution-providing companies are making the most of the battle against the pandemic, wherein mass gatherings are strictly restricted and people are being increasingly asked to work from home.

The shelter-in-place orders have fueled the demand for remote project collaborations, video conferencing, online classes, data storage, gaming, and e-commerce shopping. Such services are easily available with the help of cloud computing technology.

Moreover, big data has become one of the biggest assets for the healthcare industry. Storing and managing an enormous amount of data are of utmost importance, and cloud computing firms are emerging as key players in this regard.

Additionally, growing usage of cloud-based services is aggravating security lapses, inducing risks of hacking and phishing mails in the garb of coronavirus as the subject content. Also, usage of own devices and equipment that are

Read More

Hoboken Coronavirus Testing Site Closes Temporarily; Updates

HOBOKEN, NJ — Hoboken Mayor Ravi Bhalla said in an update on Tuesday night that the city’s uptown coronavirus testing center will close from Wednesday through Sunday, but alternatives are being offered in nearby towns during that time.

“Dr. Brahmbhatt informed me that he is unavailable for the next three days, which will result in the Riverside testing site at 14th and Jefferson Street to be closed until Monday,” Bhalla said. “We wish Dr. Brahmbhatt and his staff a restful and well-deserved time off.”

Testing demand has remained high in this mile-square city of 53,000 people, particularly with the mayor recently saying that cases are rising again.

Over the past two days, the city’s volunteer emergency response team has fielded 400 calls for testing, Bhalla said.

In addition, Bhalla and Gov. Phil Murphy have said that New Jerseyans returning from 19 states with coronavirus spikes should get tested and self-quarantine

Read More

Will U.S. Bankruptcy Rise Further Amid Coronavirus Concerns?

The coronavirus pandemic has hit companies from almost all sectors across the globe. Since the virus outbreak in mid-March, there has hardly been any business sector that has not had to bear the brunt of the crisis.

In fact, of all the sectors that have been adversely impacted, the retail industry (except those having strong online presence), restaurants, real estate industry, finance industry, gyms, cruise and airline industry are a few that are expected to face consequences in the next couple of quarters as well.

Apart from these, the oil and gas industry is amongst the many that have been hit hardest. In addition to the uncertainty resulting from the pandemic, a plunge in oil prices (due to oversupply and low prices) has become a major concern for energy companies.

In fact, the imposition of lockdown across the globe and the resulting halt in business activities in the first half

Read More

Major coronavirus developments on 7 July

Here’s what you need to know on 7 July. This article was updated at 5.15pm.

Deaths: The Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) said 44,391 people had died in hospitals, care homes and the wider community after testing positive for coronavirus in the UK as of 5pm on Monday – up by 155 from 44,236 the previous day. Read more here.

The UK coronavirus death toll has surpassed 50,000 according to figures from the Office of National Statistics (ONS). Read more here.

Politics: Downing Street has refused to apologise after Boris Johnson claimed “too many care homes” did not follow the correct procedures during the coronavirus pandemic. Care home managers have reacted angrily to the prime minister’s comments, saying they followed government advice on protecting their patients and staff. Read more here.

The Conservative Party has moved its annual conference online, in the latest event to be hit by

Read More

12 ways to cope with coronavirus anxiety, according to psychologists

millennial stressed sad depressed
millennial stressed sad depressed

Maskot/Getty Images

  • The novel coronavirus continues to batter cities and overload hospitals across the US, causing residents to experience anxiety over the unknown, the health of their loved ones, the economy, and more. 

  • Psychologists say feeling worried and anxious is normal in a crisis like this, but it can be managed. 

  • To cope, limit your media exposure to the issue, do your part in helping control the virus’s spread, reach out to others, and follow these other expert tips. 

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Know that feeling anxious about coronavirus is OK and normal.

Wall Street traders are among those experiencing stress as the economy suffers.
Wall Street traders are among those experiencing stress as the economy suffers.

Reuters

With rising case loads, physical isolation from loved ones, and, for many, a loss of routine and purpose, Americans have been enduring a mental-health crisis alongside the medical one for months. 

A May study found more than a

Read More

Remote Learning to Gain From Spike in Coronavirus Cases: 4 Picks

Businesses and schools have finally started reopening in the United States but not everyone is inclined toward physically attending them given the surge in new coronavirus cases. After registering a record 50,000+ coronavirus cases on Thursday, the United States recorded another around 40,000 new cases on Sunday.

This definitely is reason enough for people to once again stay indoors. Although most Americans expect all schools to reopen in the fall, there are chances that teachers and students may not be there. This made schools shift to online education to help students complete their semester this year and with growing fears it is likely that most will prefer learning from remote locations.

Coronavirus Fears Growing

Although states have started reopening, fears too have come back haunting after a surge in fresh coronavirus cases. The United States recorded 39,379 new coronavirus cases on Sunday and many states are contemplating putting a brake

Read More

Truck Showing Trump ‘Death Clock’ For Coronavirus Circles White House On July 4th

A billboard truck showing the “Trump Death Clock” did laps around Washington, D.C., on Saturday, bearing a stark reminder of the number of deaths that might’ve been prevented had President Donald Trump taken earlier action to mitigate the coronavirus crisis.

As Trump pushed ahead with July 4th celebrations that brought crowds to the National Mall and White House South Lawn ― despite concerns that doing so would further the spread of coronavirus ― the truck circled through the capital. On the side of the truck was a running estimate of over 77,000 deaths that could have been avoided had social distancing measures been implemented on March 9, a week earlier than the White House acted.

The names of COVID-19 victims were also read over a loudspeaker, according to a press release from Death Clock co-sponsor Public Citizen, a nonprofit consumer advocacy group.

The Death Clock uses models from two leading

Read More

Broadway Star Nick Cordero Dies at 41 After Over 90 Days in Hospital from Coronavirus Complications

Broadway star Nick Cordero has died after a months-long battle with the coronavirus. He was 41.

Cordero, whose Broadway credits include Waitress and Rock of Ages, died on Sunday morning at the Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, where he had been hospitalized for over 90 days.

He is survived by his wife Amanda Kloots, whom he wed in September 2017, and their 1-year-old son Elvis Eduardo.

“God has another angel in heaven now. My darling husband passed away this morning. He was surrounded in love by his family, singing and praying as he gently left this earth. ⠀ I am in disbelief and hurting everywhere. My heart is broken as I cannot imagine our lives without him. Nick was such a bright light. He was everyone’s friend, loved to listen, help and especially talk. He was an incredible actor and musician. He loved his family and loved being

Read More

Schools buy miles of plexiglass ahead of potential reopenings amid coronavirus pandemic

As millions of students return to school — be it K-12 or university — they’ll return to familiar settings in their classroom with one obvious addition: layers of plexiglass.

It remains unclear if schools — universities in particular — can reopen campuses amid a surge of coronavirus cases and new restrictions such as the 14-day quarantines demanded from those who travel from various to the tri-state area of Connecticut, New Jersey and New York.

Sheets of plexiglass would play a big role in a reopening, and schools across the country are investing in the plastic sheet to create a division in common spaces such as in libraries, classrooms — and even school buses — to defend against transmission of coronavirus.

“We’re hitting records… week in week out, at this point from a sales perspective,” Ryan Schroeder, CEO of Plaskolite, one of the country’s biggest plexiglass makers, told Yahoo Finance. “Orders

Read More

Coronavirus pandemic may lead to couples putting off divorce, survey finds

Getty Images/iStockphoto
Getty Images/iStockphoto

The coronavirus pandemic could lead to married couples who were previously considering divorce to delay proceedings, a survey has suggested.

In April, YouGov carried out a poll of more than 1,000 adults across the UK who had previously been divorced.

The participants were asked whether the virus outbreak would influence their decision to divorce their partner.

Of the respondents, 28 per cent said they would be less likely to pursue divorce due to the Covid-19 crisis.

A small percentage (6 per cent) said that the pandemic would make them feel more inclined to go through divorce proceedings, while the rest said it would either not be a factor in their decision or they did not know if it would be.

The survey of 1,005 adults, which was conducted for family law firm Ampla Finance, also find a marked difference between the way in which women and men felt

Read More