Data

Data Reveals Millennials Are Increasing Online Spending

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While 64 percent of Generation Z, 60 percent of Millennials, 58 percent of Generation X, and 63 percent of Baby Boomers reported reduced spending throughout the pandemic, Clutch’s latest research found spending decreases were found to have affected each generation differently. Millennials, the company said, have been seen shifting spending habits to consider present concerns rather than focusing on the future.

In the early weeks of the pandemic, the company’s survey showed 60 percent of Millennials were spending less overall, though spending more on groceries, alcohol, restaurants, and health and beauty. Cost savings and increases are in part due to wide restrictions put on lifestyles. In fact, 40 percent of Millennials reported having increased grocery expenses during the pandemic. However, the company also found Millennials are saving money due to travel restrictions. Twenty-three percent have canceled existing travel plans and an additional 32

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Tech companies make money off your data. Shouldn’t you be paid, too?

Whenever you sign up for a new social media service or website, or download an app onto your phone or computer, you’ll typically see some long disclaimer written in legalese. You scroll through it quickly and click “I agree.”

This fine print is known as a privacy policy. It lays out (sometimes in the most convoluted way possible) how the site or app can use or share your data. The problem is, no one actually reads it. You just click “Yes” and hope for the best, since that’s the price you pay for a free website, app or social media network. It seems like a pretty sweet deal.

But that’s not the deal we’re getting.

Our phones and computers can track our every movement and action. Facebook and Google log every “like” or click on their sites. There are numerous ways our data are collected, used, shared and sold by

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6 tips to create a strong password for any site, and keep your data secure

It's not hard to create a strong password.
It’s not hard to create a strong password.

ilona titova/Getty Images

  • To create a strong password, you should use a mix of upper- and lowercase letters, numbers, and symbols.

  • Once you’ve given one account a strong password, don’t reuse that password for other accounts — doing so means that if one account is hacked, all of your accounts can be compromised.

  • Using a password manager will help you keep track of your passwords, and allow you to create strong passwords for every account.

  • Visit Business Insider’s Tech Reference library for more stories.

Passwords can be immensely annoying, especially if you have many different accounts. Eventually, something will come along to replace them — many modern smartphones already use face or fingerprint scanners.

But right now, we have to use passwords. This means that you should know how to create strong and unique passwords to protect your accounts.

Why strong, complex

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Make tech companies pay you for your data

Countless businesses collect, use, share and sell consumer data. The largest tech companies, like Facebook and Google, profit most. <span class="copyright">(Josh Edelson / AFP / Getty Images)</span>
Countless businesses collect, use, share and sell consumer data. The largest tech companies, like Facebook and Google, profit most. (Josh Edelson / AFP / Getty Images)

Whenever you sign up for a new social media service or website, or download an app onto your phone or computer, you’ll typically see some long disclaimer language written in legalese. You scroll through it quickly and click the “I agree” button.

This fine print is known as a privacy policy. It essentially lays out (sometimes in the most convoluted way possible) how the site or app can use or share your data. The problem is, no one actually reads the language. You just click “yes” and hope for the best, since that’s the price you pay for a free website or app or social media network. It seems like a pretty sweet deal. But that’s not the deal we’re getting.

Our phones and

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Data protection app Jumbo now lets you secure LinkedIn and Instagram

Credit: Jumbo
Credit: Jumbo

Privacy app Jumbo has launched an update to its service which allows users to take control over their Instagram and LinkedIn accounts.

Jumbo, which launched in 2019, allows users sign in with their social accounts for apps including Facebook, Google, Amazon, and Twitter.

The app then changes your privacy settings automatically, letting users bypass the sometimes-confusing menu screens.

Such issues have plagued technology companies for years. Google is currently being sued by the state of Arizona for its complex location settings, while Facebook’s Cambridge Analytica scandal is now infamous.

While users need to log in via their social media accounts, this does not give Jumbo actual access to content posted on those sites. All of the processing is coming from the device itself, which means Jumbo does not have access to your data.

Jumbo’s first subscription tier, Jumbo Plus, is designed for more casual users, CEO Pierre Valade

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