Fuel

As COVID-19 Continues to Fuel E-commerce, Buy Now, Pay Later Programs Evolve

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According to CB Insights, there are 67 fintech unicorns with a combined valuation of $252.6 billion. And notably, standouts from this list include “buy now, pay later” companies who, as e-commerce continues to rise during the coronavirus pandemic, have experienced exponential sales.

In May, PayPal reported having 325 million active accounts, having gained 7.5 million new accounts in April alone. And in June, the company announced it has expanded its buy now, pay later solutions to France making it one of the first payment installment solutions for small businesses in France. According to data from PayPal, 84 percent of French consumers are more likely to shop again at a retailer that offers installments.

Splitit also achieved record growth during the pandemic, achieving increased conversion and average order value as online shopping rates soared. On July 8, the company announced it had processed more

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What Is Yield Farming? The Rocket Fuel of DeFi, Explained

It’s effectively July 2017 in the world of decentralized finance (DeFi), and as in the heady days of the initial coin offering (ICO) boom, the numbers are only trending up.

According to DeFi Pulse, there is $1.9 billion in crypto assets locked in DeFi right now. According to the CoinDesk ICO Tracker, the ICO market started chugging past $1 billion in July 2017, just a few months before token sales started getting talked about on TV.

Debate juxtaposing these numbers if you like, but what no one can question is this: Crypto users are putting more and more value to work in DeFi applications, driven largely by the introduction of a whole new yield-generating pasture, Compound’s COMP governance token.

Governance tokens enable users to vote on the future of decentralized protocols, sure, but they also present fresh ways for DeFi founders to entice assets onto their platforms.

That said, it’s … Read More

Hollis Wong-Wear Builds a Business to Fuel Her Art

In NerdWallet’s Money/Makers Q&A series, we talk with artists and innovators about their money moves, including unique struggles they’ve faced and lessons they’ve learned along the way.

Musician and activist Hollis Wong-Wear built up a business model that gives her more freedom to pursue creative work. (Photo by Janae Jones)

Hollis Wong-Wear knows what it means to fight for what you’re worth. The Los Angeles-based musician and activist has worked for years to build the business infrastructure needed to make her passion profitable — while championing the social causes she believes in.

In the beginning, that meant working on music for free while holding down a side job. She began collaborating with other musicians, such as Macklemore and Ryan Lewis, and got a deep understanding of the logistics of making money as a musician.

Once she had that foundational knowledge, Wong-Wear professionalized. She formed an S corp, a type of

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