Generation

Discounts galore as online sales begin, most business generation expected from Tier I & II cities



a close up of a sign: With continuing trends, big offers have been introduced by e-commerce websites on such products.


© Provided by The Financial Express
With continuing trends, big offers have been introduced by e-commerce websites on such products.

By Reya Mehrotra

The virtual marketplace is bustling with offers and discounts. With the start of The Amazon Great Indian Festival, Myntra’s Big Fashion Festival, Flipkart’s Big Billion Days Sale, this year, small and medium businesses are looking to pick-up through online mediums like Amazon Karigar & Flipkart Samarth that enables craftsmen to have a wider approach.

To encourage festive shopping, in a first, Amazon has announced a sale season lasting up to a month starting from October 17 contrary to the usual 5-6 days of sale while Flipkart would stick to its 5-day sale festival ending October 21. It has also incorporated SME sellers from 20000 local shops to help them generate business. A big reason for this was the surge in online orders. The Festive Shopping Index 2020

Read More

How This 21 Year Old Instagram Influencer And Real Estate Investor Yearns For Success And Aspires To Inspire A Generation

Mikylee Bonthoux is a young and upcoming Instagram growth expert and influencer. Mikylee has always been fascinated by fast cars, fancy boats and flashy toys. This motivated him to start finding ways to make money, even at a young age. As he grew older, he did lots of odd jobs and eventually realised he still wasn’t going to make the kind of money he was after by working the traditional nine to five. He needed to find a way to stop trading his time for money, and also he had to find a way to make money work for him.

Mikylee realized early on that living life working for somebody else, making their dreams come true, was no way to live life. Mikylee knew there had to be a way to be his own boss and make more money on his own terms, rather than working a traditional job.

“So

Read More

How esports is quietly spawning a whole new generation of problem gamblers

Most large sports events came to an abrupt halt during the pandemic, but one category was not only unaffected but enjoyed accelerated growth: esports. Esports is the competitive playing of video games such as League of Legends, Fortnite and Fifa Football.

The audiences for the biggest titles are now enormous. Fortnite alone has around 78 million monthly players and professional tournaments draw in many millions of online spectators. League of Legends World Championship attracted over 100 million viewers in 2019 with a peak of 44 million. In comparison, the Wimbledon men’s final 2019 peaked at around 9 million viewers.

It’s not just the size of the audience that’s different, it’s also their age. The average tennis spectator is 61, whereas esports spectators are on average 26.

Major bookmakers such as PaddyPower, Bet365 and Betway, along with many niche operators, are now offering bets on esports tournaments. Monthly esports betting

Read More

What Citigroup’s new female CEO Jane Fraser means for business and the next generation

Citigroup’s announcement this week that Jane Fraser would become its next CEO is leading to applause nationwide. She is now the first woman to lead a major bank.

This comes as no surprise – especially with COVID changing so much of the way we live now and the #BlackLivesMatter movement calling for unprecedented action relating to women, diversity and equal opportunity.

CITI CEO MICHAEL CORBAT TO RETIRE IN FEBRUARY

And indeed, there are a host of incredible women in banking driving growth and innovation – from U.S. Bank’s Kate Quinn to Bank of America’s Cathy Bessant, to name a few.

But the implications are far greater than just having a woman at the top.

This generation has made a seismic shift in equality – something that is likely to trickle down to where they bank.

Imagine if the 170 million adult women – just over 50% of the U.S. population

Read More

Teen Vogue Unveils Generation Next Designers

Teen Vogue is continuing to support up-and-coming designers during a trying year for fashion through its Generation Next initiative — and like much of 2020, it will take place largely virtually.

Krystal Paniagua, Tolu Coker and Elliss, all based in London, and New York brands Theophilio and Abacaxi have been tapped to join the mentorship initiative, now in its second year, with editors stating that the designers encapsulate their ethos of the new guard of fashion, embracing themes of diversity, representation, inclusivity and sustainability.

Since the pandemic and resulting travel restrictions have meant the now online-only fashion and culture vertical for younger readers is unable to bring all of this year’s group over to New York Fashion Week for a glitzy in-person fashion presentation like in 2019, editor in chief Lindsay Peoples Wagner is ensuring they still get the support they need virtually. That includes a series of mentorship sessions

Read More

From COVID Generation to Crypto Generation

Last year, before a pandemic changed the world, surveys showed millennials and adult-age Generation Z respondents steadily developing a curiosity in cryptocurrencies if not buying into the bigger idea that the technology will transform money. 

20% of affluent millennials – the cohort born between 1980 and 1996 – invested in cryptocurrencies, compared with just 3% for the general population. Meanwhile, an online Harris/Blockchain Capital poll found 60% of people aged 18-34, a demographic covering six years of Gen Zers and 10 of millennials, were “somewhat familiar” with bitcoin, compared with 43% overall. ” data-reactid=”20″A Michelmores survey in the U.K., for example, found that 20% of affluent millennials – the cohort born between 1980 and 1996 – invested in cryptocurrencies, compared with just 3% for the general population. Meanwhile, an online Harris/Blockchain Capital poll found 60% of people aged 18-34, a demographic covering six years of Gen Zers and 10

Read More

UK workers switch careers in ‘toughest jobs market in a generation’

Unemployment is expected to keep edging higher with some firms still not even able to reopen. Photo: Dinendra Haria/SOPA Images/Sipa USA
Unemployment is expected to keep edging higher with some firms still not even able to reopen. Photo: Dinendra Haria/SOPA Images/Sipa USA

When Manchester restaurant 20 Stories advertised for a receptionist last month, managers were shocked to receive 963 applications in a single day.

The incident starkly illustrates one of the many ways employment in modern Britain has been transformed by the coronavirus pandemic.

Many firms had been struggling to fill vacancies before COVID-19 struck, with employment hovering around record highs. But the recession triggered by the virus and subsequent lockdown has wreaked havoc in the labour market.

The headlines have been dominated by lay-offs. Recruitment remains well below pre-virus levels in many sectors, despite a slight recent uptick and employment in a handful of growth industries booming like never before.

READ MORE: Recruiter Hays sees ‘modest’ improvement in jobs market

The crisis has forced workers to adjust to enormous changes

Read More

Sandwich Generation Faces Caregiving Challenges

the pandemic hit. Four years ago, the full-time working mother of three became a full-fledged member of the “sandwich generation” when her father-in-law joined their household in Brewster, N.Y. But things got harder in March, when schooling for her three children, ages 5, 8 and 10, abruptly went online in response to the spread of the coronavirus. Galluzzo, a digital marketer, and her husband, David, a lawyer, started working from home. Her child care disappeared, as did her cleaning help.” data-reactid=”19″Things were hard enough for Jennifer Galluzzo before the pandemic hit. Four years ago, the full-time working mother of three became a full-fledged member of the “sandwich generation” when her father-in-law joined their household in Brewster, N.Y. But things got harder in March, when schooling for her three children, ages 5, 8 and 10, abruptly went online in response to the spread of the coronavirus. Galluzzo, a digital marketer,

Read More

7 lead generation lessons we learned by creating a Facebook quiz

Did you know we have an online event about digital marketing coming up? Join the Re:Brand track at TNW2020 to explore the latest brand marketing tech, trends, and challenges. Alex Antolino, the Creative Director at Typeform, will be sharing powerful branding insights and actionable strategies on how to build meaningful brands that lead to business growth.

“Dogfooding.” What’s that all about?

The first time I heard that term was last year when we, the Marketing team, were planning for the quarter. We had a company goal of promoting lead generation through quizzes, a popular use of our product. So to better understand the opportunities and pains of other marketers, we decided to go through the process ourselves. Hence, eating our own dog food.

So we created a quiz on marketing trends in 2020. You can give it a go here:

The lead gen part comes in at the end. The

Read More