giants

The Kiwi media mogul challenging online giants

Tucked away in Sinead Boucher’s sock drawer is the one-dollar coin that transformed the former journalist into New Zealand’s biggest media mogul, giving her a platform to challenge Facebook and other social media giants.

Boucher, 50, bought media giant Stuff Ltd for the nominal sum of NZ$1.00 (US$0.67) in May, taking control of New Zealand’s most popular news website, stuff.co.nz, and mastheads such as Wellington’s Dominion Post and the Christchurch Press.

Already a senior executive at the company, Boucher was well aware of the challenges facing news media world-wide — describing a business model “shredded” by the online giants, with revenues further slashed by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Some companies, such as Germany’s Bauer Media, decided New Zealand’s small market was not worth the bother and shut their local operations, a fate Boucher was determined Stuff would avoid.

“I couldn’t bear the thought of all these titles, not just the website

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Tech giants face new fines and break-ups under UK recommendations

Apps - Yui Mok/PA
Apps – Yui Mok/PA

Britain’s monopolies watchdog has called for new powers to stop Google and Facebook abusing their dominant position in online advertising, including being able to levy fresh fines on the tech firms and split out their operations. 

In recommendations for the Government, the UK’s competition watchdog said “existing laws are not suitable for effective regulation”, and urged a new “pro competition regulatory regime” be established.

It said a new regulatory body, termed a “digital markets unit”, should be able to enforce a code of conduct to stop Google and Facebook from being able to engage in “exploitative or exclusionary practices”. The group should be able to impose significant fines if companies fail to alter their behaviour. 

The Competition and Markets Authority recommended that the unit should be able to order Google to open up its data to allow rival search engines to compete against it, as well

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Tech employees are selling referrals online to job candidates for under $50 to help them get hired at Google, Facebook, and other industry giants

Rooftop Slushie was reportedly named after a character in HBO's "Silicon Valley" TV show depicting a strikingly accurate portrayal of the tech industry.
Rooftop Slushie was reportedly named after a character in HBO’s “Silicon Valley” TV show depicting a strikingly accurate portrayal of the tech industry.

Warner Bros/IMDb

  • A website is allowing prospective tech employees to anonymously purchase a job referral from existing tech workers for $20 to $50 apiece.

  • Rooftop Slushie, created by the makers of techie chat favorite Blind, has hosted 11,000 referral transactions since it was launched in 2019. Facebook and Google referrals are the most popular.

  • The “vendors” are established employees at companies like Amazon, Google, and Twitter who can become verified on the website and vet candidate submissions before accepting the deal.

  • The site’s product manager told One Zero that the service helps improve a skilled candidate’s chances of getting hired, but critics say paying for and accepting payment for a job referral is unethical.

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The hiring process in the tech

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