hate

It’s my job to help tackle online hate and structural racism

Prince Harry talks social media hate and structural racism
Prince Harry talks social media hate and structural racism

The Duke of Sussex has said it will take “every single person on the planet” to tackle racism, as the author of a controversial new biography claimed the monarchy missed a unique opportunity to have “diversity, inclusivity and representation” at its heart.

Prince Harry said that expecting charities to solve racism was “like throwing a bucket of water on a forest fire,” suggesting that it was now so ingrained in society that structural change was the only answer.

His intervention came as Omid Scobie, co-author of Finding Freedom, published on Tuesday, that racism “really did play a role” in the couple’s decision to quit royal life, stating that the “level of ignorance” within palace walls “made it very difficult for Meghan.”

He said: “History will remember them as a couple that were perhaps failed by the institution of the monarchy.”

The

Read More

US attorneys general urge Facebook to offer live responses for hate speech

New Jersey Attorney General Gurbir Grewal called Facebook’s platforms “the biggest vehicles out there for spreading hate and disinformation” in an interview with the The Wall Street Journal. In addition to having personal experience being the target of hate on Facebook as a Sikh who wears a turban, he also once alerted the social network about a New Jersey group dedicated towards driving out Orthodox Jews from a particular area. It apparently took Facebook 10 months to remove the group. “This is a platform where hate and disinformation spreads like wildfire in minutes. Somebody needs to be able to pick up a phone to call and get help,” he said.

That’s one of the measures the attorneys general have recommended in their letter: launching a hotline offering live real-time assistance that people can use to report intimidation and harassment. It could be especially helpful for doxxing victims, seeing as

Read More

20 state attorneys general are demanding that Facebook improve its policing of online hate speech and disinformation

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg.
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg.

Getty Images

  • State attorneys general are calling on Facebook to do more to fight hate speech and disinformation.

  • 20 AGs signed an open letter addressing the social network on Wednesday.

  • The coalition asks Facebook to more closely police itself, and improve tools for users who are trying to report harassment and abuse.

  • Facebook said in a statement it “share[s] the Attorneys General’s goal of ensuring people feel safe on the internet.”

Twenty state attorneys general from across the US are demanding Facebook do more to combat hate speech and disinformation on the social network.

In an open letter published Wednesday, the top legal officers of California, New York, the District of Columbia, and more than a dozen other states called on Facebook’s CEO Mark Zuckerberg and COO Sheryl Sandberg to better police its platform. (The New York Times earlier reported on the letter.)

Facebook has been

Read More

Reddit moderators spent years asking for help fighting hate. The company may finally be listening

For years Jefferson Kelley watched hate bloom in his treasured online spaces.

When Kelley, a Reddit moderator, booted hateful users off threads where Black people discussed sensitive personal experiences, racial slurs piled up in his inbox. Crude remarks about women filled the comment sections under his favorite “Star Trek” GIFs. The proliferation of notorious forums, including one that perpetuated a vicious racist stereotype about Black fathers, stung Kelley, a Black father himself.

Kelley and other moderators repeatedly pleaded with the company to back them up and take stronger action against harassment and hate speech. But Reddit never quite came through.

Then, all of a sudden, that seemed to change. When Reddit announced last week it was shutting down a noxious pro-Trump group that had violated the site’s rules for years, Kelley could scarcely believe it.

Reddit’s move to overhaul content policy and ban some 2,000 subreddits, or forums, is one

Read More

4 Ways You Were Conditioned To Hate Fitness As A Kid

Years of viewing fitness as punishment can take some time to repair. (Photo: Getty Images/HuffPost)
Years of viewing fitness as punishment can take some time to repair. (Photo: Getty Images/HuffPost)

Experiences we have when we’re young are incredibly formative ― especially when it comes to something like exercise.

Fitness isn’t just physical; it also has a major effect on the mind. If you have a positive outlook on it (or even just a tolerable one), the likelihood is pretty good that exercise will improve your mental health. But if you’ve had negative emotions about working out in the past, chances are that moving your body can cause more stress than you may even think is worth it.

Part of that stems from how you may have thought about exercise when you were young. There are a handful of subtle ways we can be conditioned to hate fitness as kids. Below are just a few of them:

Mandated School Fitness Tests And Curriculum

Requiring students to

Read More

YouTube shuts down far-right channels over hate speech

San Francisco (AFP) – YouTube on Monday shut down six far-right channels for violating rules against “supremacist” content, booting videos by David Duke, Stefan Molyneux and Richard Spencer.

The video sharing platform pulled the plug on the channels as online social media platforms face increasing pressure to crack down on hateful rhetoric.

“We have strict policies prohibiting hate speech on YouTube, and terminate any channel that repeatedly or egregiously violates those policies,” YouTube said in response to an AFP inquiry about the move.

Since updating guidelines a year ago to better address supremacist content, YouTube saw a fivefold spike in video removals and has terminated more than 25,000 channels for violating hate speech policies, the spokesperson added.

YouTube said that the channels removed Monday included Duke, Molyneux, Spencer and American Renaissance.

All the terminated channels broke YouTube rules by alleging that members of protected groups were innately inferior to others,

Read More

Parents and kids hate online learning, but they could face more of it

In his suburban New Jersey home-turned-classroom this spring, parent Don Seaman quickly found himself in the role of household vice principal.

While his wife holed up in the bedroom to work each day, Seaman, a media and marketing professional, worked from the family room where he could supervise his children’s virtual learning. A similar scene played out in millions of American homes after schools shuttered and moved classes online to contain the coronavirus.

Now that the year’s over, Seaman has strong feelings about the experience: Despite the best efforts of teachers, virtual learning didn’t work. At least not uniformly, if his three children in elementary, middle and high school are any indication.

“The older kids were saying ‘This is hell,'” Seaman said. “My kids feel isolated, and they can’t keep up, and they’re struggling with it.”

But like it or not, remote instruction and virtual learning are likely to continue

Read More

Parents and kids hate online classes. Going back to school likely will include more of it.

In his suburban New Jersey home-turned-classroom this spring, parent Don Seaman quickly found himself in the role of household vice principal.

While his wife holed up in the bedroom to work each day, Seaman, a media and marketing professional, worked from the family room where he could supervise his children’s virtual learning. A similar scene played out in millions of American homes after schools shuttered and moved classes online to contain the coronavirus.

Now that the year’s over, Seaman has strong feelings about the experience: Despite the best efforts of teachers, virtual learning didn’t work. At least not uniformly, if his three children in elementary, middle and high school are any indication.

“The older kids were saying, ‘This is hell,'” Seaman said. “My kids feel isolated, and they can’t keep up, and they’re struggling with it.”

But like it or not, remote instruction and virtual learning are likely to continue

Read More

Starbucks suspends social media ads over hate speech

Starbucks has announced it will suspend advertising on some social media platforms in response to hate speech.

The coffee giant joins global brands including Coca-Cola, Diageo and Unilever which have recently removed advertising from social platforms.

A Starbucks spokesperson told the BBC the social media “pause” would not include YouTube, owned by Google.

“We believe in bringing communities together, both in person and online,” Starbucks said in a statement.

The brand said it would “have discussions internally and with media partners and civil rights organizations to stop the spread of hate speech”. But it will continue to post on social media without paid promotion, it said.

The announcement came after Coca-Cola called for “greater accountability” from social media firms.

Coca Cola said it would pause advertising on all social media platforms globally, while Unilever, owner of Ben & Jerry’s ice cream, said it would halt Twitter, Facebook and Instagram advertising

Read More

Facebook announces new hate speech and misinformation policies amid advertiser revolt

Facebook is changing a number of policies relating to hate speech and voter suppression on the platform, the chief executive officer, Mark Zuckerberg, said in a surprise live video on Friday.

The announcements were made in a hurried appearance by the executive on his personal Facebook page shortly after Unilever announced that it was pulling advertisements for the next six months – which sent Facebook stock tumbling more than 7%.

More than 100 brands have joined a boycott of advertising on Facebook due to its failure to address hate speech and violence on the platform – most recently the major advertisers Verizon and Unilever. Facebook makes about 98% of its $70bn in annual revenue from advertising. Zuckerberg did not directly address the boycott in his statement Friday.

Unilever’s joining of the boycott put significant pressure on Facebook, said Nicole Perrin, the principal analyst at market research firm eMarketer. As one

Read More