hope

Loan program ends, hard-hit businesses hope for 2nd chance

NEW YORK (AP) — Small businesses are in limbo again as the coronavirus outbreak rages and the government’s $659 billion relief program draws to a close.

Companies still struggling with sharply reduced revenue are wondering if Congress will give them a second chance at the Paycheck Protection Program, which ends Saturday after giving out 5.1 million loans worth $523 billion. While the program that began April 3 has gotten mixed reviews, business owners still need help as the virus continues to spread and hamstring the economy.

“They’ve exhausted their funds and are looking for a Round Two,” says Molly Day, a spokeswoman for the National Small Business Association, an advocacy group.

Congress is debating further help for small business as part of a broader coronavirus relief package. One proposal would allow the hardest-hit businesses, those whose revenue is down over 50%, to return for a second PPP loan; there’s still

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Colleges hope new rules will slow COVID-19 spread, students aren’t convinced

Colleges want their students back this fall. That much is clear.

What’s less clear are the new rules for student conduct in the midst of a pandemic, and how universities will go about enforcing them, especially when the offensive behavior takes place off-campus – or overnight.

The University of Texas at Austin, for example, has banned parties, both on campus and off, saying they put “the health and safety of our community at risk and raise anxiety levels.”

Tulane University in New Orleans threatened suspension or expulsion for students who throw or attend parties that have more than 15 people and asked students to monitor and report on the behavior of their peers.

“Do you really want to be the reason that Tulane and New Orleans have to shut down again?” the message to students concluded. 

University of Pennsylvania officials have asked that students refrain from organizing parties while prohibiting

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Bill Gates describes ‘what gives us hope’ amid the coronavirus pandemic

The coronavirus pandemic as killed more than 150,000 Americans, disrupted the U.S. economy, and thrown society into disarray heading into the fall.

If there is any silver lining, according to Microsoft Co-Founder Bill Gates, it would be the progress made toward treating people with COVID-19, the disease caused by coronavirus, and a vaccine.

“The only positive thing out of this is that the pace of innovation, the way [the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation] is working with the private sector to create therapeutics and vaccines, that’s moving at record speed,” Gates said in an episode of Influencers with Andy Serwer.

“And that’s what gives us hope,” he added. “That we can get the death rate down, better therapeutics … and then during 2021, we should be able to manufacture a lot of vaccines.” 

Bill and Melinda Gates on Good Morning America. (Photo: Ida Mae Astute/Walt Disney Television via Getty

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For Grief-Stricken West Louisville, Hope Looks Like A Grocery Store

Cassia Herron fumed as she watched an armored SWAT vehicle idle in the parking lot across from David McAtee’s barbecue stand in Louisville, Kentucky. It had only been four days since city police and National Guardsmen had fatally shot McAtee while enforcing a curfew during protests sparked in part by the March killing of another Black Louisville resident, Breonna Taylor. The city was raw with anguish.

McAtee was a fixture in Louisville’s West End, who worked for years as a cook at a local homeless shelter and was known for giving away food to customers at his restaurant who couldn’t afford to pay. People in West Louisville don’t need armored police intimidating residents, said Herron, a local entrepreneur and community advocate; they need the city to prioritize their health and well-being. They need grocery stores.

In the past five years, more than a dozen grocers have abandoned the city.

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2020 graduates face uncertain job market with hope

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – If everything had gone according to plan, Missy Wood thought she’d have a job helping at-risk youths by now. 

Wood, a recent graduate of Middle Tennessee State University, saw her internship with Court-Appointed Special Advocates end abruptly in March as the COVID-19 pandemic took root in Tennessee. She started applying for jobs with the Department of Children’s Services and similar organizations in April.

By the time she graduated in May, new job postings for her chosen career had all but disappeared.

Wood is one of the thousands of graduates across the nation who face a turbulent job market amid the novel coronavirus pandemic. More than 47 million Americans have filed jobless benefit claims since the middle of March, according to the Labor Department.  

Eli Kellum, 7, climbs on the back of babysitter Missy Wood in the Kellum family's backyard in Murfreesboro on June 18, 2020, as the two play on the trampoline. Wood has been looking for work since April but has not been able to find any child-focused social work positions since graduating from MTSU in May. After the pandemic hit, job postings for her planned career seemed to disappear.
Eli Kellum, 7, climbs on the back of babysitter Missy Wood in the Kellum family’s backyard in Murfreesboro on June 18, 2020, as the
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Cannes Delivers Big Titles, Sales & Hope but Questions Market Models

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“The Blacksmith,” “Ferrari,” “Armageddon Time” and “The Card Counter” look like market highlights of an extraordinary Cannes market, which saw its two virtual platforms delivering for a select number of big U.S. projects, amid large market caution and even fear of a second COVID-19 spike.

In the art film sector, Cannes Official Selection label titles made much of the running, with distributors lamenting that they would have loved to have seen more screened at Cannes. “Without the festival, the market was weak in terms of arthouse, because we lacked the buzz, hype and the experience of being all together in a screening room,” said Stefano Massenzi, head of acquisitions and business affairs at Italy’s distribution banner Lucky Red.

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Equally, more mainstream distributors looked for greater depth in the pre-sales market. Most everyone, however, was delighted and some even surprised that

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B.C.’s new virus models renew hope for Canadian travel, Atlantic Canada considers travel bubble

Yahoo News Canada is committed to providing our readers with the most accurate and recent information on all things coronavirus. We know things change quickly, including some possible information in this story. For the latest on COVID-19, we encourage our readers to consult online resources like Canada’s public health website, World Health Organization, as well as our own Yahoo Canada homepage.

As cases of COVID-19 continue to spread around the world, Canadians seem to be increasingly concerned about their health and safety

Currently, there are more than 101,900 confirmed coronavirus cases in Canada and more than 8,400 deaths.

Check back for the latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak in Canada.

For a full archive of the first month of the pandemic, please check our archive of events.

June 24

6:15 p.m. COVID-19 questions of the day

5:45 p.m.: B.C. moving into Phase 3 with the resumption of

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