Impact

With COVID-19 complicating enrollment counts, public schools brace for impact on funding

MILWAUKEE — For schools across Wisconsin, Friday could turn out to be the single most important day on the calendar this year.

The third Friday in September is significant every year for Wisconsin public schools and private schools that accept children on taxpayer-funded vouchers. By law, students counted as enrolled on that date dictate in large part state and local funding for the current school year — and in many cases beyond.

The date is different for schools in other states, but the consequences are largely the same, and the coronavirus pandemic is complicating this year’s counts all over as schools struggle to connect with students online, and families move their children to different schools or pull them out altogether to be home-schooled. 

“We’re anticipating the counts will be down,” said John Bales, executive director of the Wisconsin Association of School District Administrators.

“Accessing kids will be problematic this fall.

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Invest in this One Alternative Investment for Major Money Impact

Alternative investments can seem like a woo-woo way to earn money — but shove that thinking aside. Here’s one way to invest that can make a huge impact on your portfolio: Invest in blue-chip art.

More specifically, invest with Masterworks.

What is Masterworks?

Masterworks is an investment platform for art. You can purchase shares that represent partial ownership of a painting from big-name artists like Banksy or Basquiat.” data-reactid=”22″Masterworks is an investment platform for art. You can purchase shares that represent partial ownership of a painting from big-name artists like Banksy or Basquiat.

Masterworks selects artists believed to have favorable risk-reward profiles and puts up the capital to purchase the paintings. After it files a circular with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), investors like you can invest in shares. When the painting is sold, investors share in the profit and loss like any other investment vehicle.

One of

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Businesses in Milwaukee seeing the impact of a mostly virtual DNC

Organizers said 50,000 people would travel to the beer-loving town, maxing out its supply of hotel rooms, pack its bars and generate $200 million in economic activity.

(MORE: 2020 Democratic National Convention Viewer’s Guide: Biden anchored in Delaware, a virtual nomination and history to be made)” data-reactid=”14″(MORE: 2020 Democratic National Convention Viewer’s Guide: Biden anchored in Delaware, a virtual nomination and history to be made)

But the coronavirus outbreak disrupted those plans, forcing Democrats to conduct a virtual convention with a limited number of speakers, officials and production staff on the ground, even after the city sunk millions into preparations.

When the DNC announced two weeks ago that former Vice President Joe Biden

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CAA’s Bryan Lourd on the WGA, Black Lives Matter and the Pandemic’s Impact on the Business

In a sprawling keynote conversation with Ziffren Brittenham partner Ken Ziffren at the UCLA Entertainment Symposium, CAA managing partner and co-chairman Bryan Lourd opened up about his thoughts on the ongoing Writers Guild conflict, the Black Lives Matter movement and the agency’s efforts to diversify, and the COVID-19 pandemic’s impact on the entertainment industry.

Lourd was a late addition to the roster; former WarnerMedia Entertainment chairman Bob Greenblatt had originally been slated to speak before his sudden departure from the company amid a major executive shakeup last week.

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On the topic of the ongoing packaging feud between the Writers Guild of America and the major talent agencies, Lourd said that he feels a “great responsibility to the entire culture and the entire ecosystem of the artists’ side of the equation of show business.”

“With zero sort of apology, I hate how this has gone; I don’t like

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Americans concerned about economic impact as coronavirus cases surge

WASHINGTON — Less than a quarter of adults believe the U.S. economy is “excellent” or “good” as the coronavirus pandemic and economic anxiety related to its spread loom large, new data from the NBC News|SurveyMonkey tracking poll show.

Overall, just 2 percent called the economy “excellent,” with 21 percent calling it “good.” The plurality, 43 percent, called the economy “fair,” while 32 percent rated it “poor.”

When asked what issue matters most to them, every subgroup across economic, age, education and racial lines said jobs and the economy — except for Democrats, liberals or those with postgraduate degrees. In those groups, health care rated first, followed by jobs and the economy.

With the unemployment rate above 11 percent, 74 percent of adults said they are concerned that the coronavirus will have a negative impact on their household finances. And 91 percent of adults said the pandemic will have a negative

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College Roommates Launch Program to Help Essential Workers in Need: ‘Make a Meaningful Impact’

A group of students at Dartmouth College are doing their part to ensure that no frontline worker struggles to obtain essential items during the coronavirus pandemic — one donor match at a time.

Back in March, roommates Amy Guan and Rine Uhm helplessly watched as their spring semester and summer plans crumbled due to the pandemic.

“We ended up losing internships, I lost my in-person graduation, but at the same time, it was hard to be sad about these losses with everything else going around in the world,” Guan, 21, tells PEOPLE. “We would spend a lot of time reading the news and sharing stories that we found interesting about the risks and struggles that essential workers have been facing.”

“The more we read, the more we realized that there was a lack of access to basic necessities that a lot of other people might have lying around their house

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Shop landlords face ‘reckoning’ over COVID-19 impact

People wearing face masks walk past a sale sign on Oxford Street in London. Photo: David Cliff/NurPhoto via Getty Images
People wearing face masks walk past a sale sign on Oxford Street in London. Photo: David Cliff/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Wednesday (24 June) marked the second quarterly rent day of the year for shops in the UK.

Quarterly, rather than monthly rents, are a British peculiarity dating back to a time when landlords used to drive a horse and cart around their properties to collect rents. Takings this quarter are likely to be historically light.

Retail landlords collected only around 50% of rents due in the first quarter of 2020, according to the British Property Federation, and the collection is expected to be even lower this time around.

“I can see it being historically low — I could see 10-15% of rent paid,” Jonathan De Mello, executive director of retail property adviser Harper Dennis Hobbs, told Yahoo Finance UK.

Saturday afternoon shoppers at Oxford Circus in London. Photo: David Cliff/NurPhoto via Getty Images
Saturday afternoon shoppers at Oxford Circus in London. Photo: David Cliff/NurPhoto
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British Land, Intu, Hammerson and more face ‘reckoning’ on COVID impact

People wearing face masks walk past a sale sign on Oxford Street in London. Photo: David Cliff/NurPhoto via Getty Images
People wearing face masks walk past a sale sign on Oxford Street in London. Photo: David Cliff/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Wednesday (24 June) marked the second quarterly rent day of the year for shops in the UK.

Quarterly, rather than monthly rents, are a British peculiarity dating back to a time when landlords used to drive a horse and cart around their properties to collect rents. Takings this quarter are likely to be historically light.

Retail landlords collected only around 50% of rents due in the first quarter of 2020, according to the British Property Federation, and the collection is expected to be even lower this time around.

“I can see it being historically low — I could see 10-15% of rent paid,” Jonathan De Mello, executive director of retail property adviser Harper Dennis Hobbs, told Yahoo Finance UK.

Saturday afternoon shoppers at Oxford Circus in London. Photo: David Cliff/NurPhoto via Getty Images
Saturday afternoon shoppers at Oxford Circus in London. Photo: David Cliff/NurPhoto
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Here’s How Cartier Is Helping Female Entrepreneurs Make a Big Global Impact

Click here to read the full article.

Ready for a little good news? Cartier has announced 21 finalists for its Cartier Women’s Initiative, three of which hail from North America. Each year since 2006, the French jewelry and watch maison has used the platform to support female entrepreneurs with start-up businesses aimed at making a social or environmental impact. To date, CWI has given over $3 million to aid 240 women from 56 different countries. Of the various female-run companies to participate over the last 14 years, 80 percent are still in operation 15 years later, according to Cartier CEO Cyrille Vigneron. That is an impressive number given that statistically, only 25 percent of new businesses survive to the 15-year marker.

While the businesses that take part in CWI are for profit, Vigneron says their ultimate goal is to make effect change for the good of humanity. “They work deeply

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