information

Sally Pipes: Dems use coronavirus to push ‘Medicare-for-all,’ but their ploy is based on bad information

More than 5 million Americans have lost their employer-sponsored health insurance due to coronavirus-related unemployment, according to a new study from FamiliesUSA. In response, Democrats are renewing their push for “Medicare-for-all”.

Just this week, 360 Democratic delegates promised to vote against any party platform that doesn’t endorse single-payer health care. In their formal petition, they cite insurance losses from the pandemic as a chief reason why they consider “Medicare-for-all” non-negotiable.

But this political ploy is based on bad information. While the pandemic has cost millions of workers their jobs, many of them still have access to affordable coverage. Citing the coronavirus-fueled economic crisis as a reason to scrap private insurance is deeply irresponsible — and would leave the vast majority of Americans worse off.

OBAMA, IN DISCUSSION WITH BIDEN, SAYS HE ‘COULDN’T BE PROUDER’ OF OBAMACARE

For starters, it’s far from clear that the turmoil in the labor market has

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Cyber criminals using election to get personal information: FBI

Scammers are trying to exploit the high level of interest in the U.S. presidential election as a way to steal personal information.

Swindlers are posing as fundraisers, pollsters and candidates and even launching fake voter registration drives to trick citizens into providing personal information and bank account details, the Associated Press reported.

The FBI, the Better Business Bureau and cybersecurity experts are warning about increasingly sophisticated online fraud schemes centered around the election that take advantage of high interest and the desire to get involved.

From natural disasters to the pandemic, it’s common for online grifters to tailor scams to take advantage of current events. Complaints to the FBI cybercrime reporting site quadrupled to up to 4,000 a day since the coronavirus pandemic started, for example.

The final weeks of the election are providing a ripe opportunity for cybercriminals, who often take advantage of the same tools use by foreign

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Your Intranet’s Information Architecture Matters More Than You May Realize

Louvre Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates


PHOTO:
Alvaro Pinot

Business managers seldom put a high value on something as technical as the information architecture of the intranet. But not doing so leads to a number of issues. Here are five business situations where poor intranet information architecture has a direct business impact.

1. Customer Experience

I was in a call center one day and noticed a strange behavior: Call reps would listen to a customer request, cover the phone’s microphone and ask their colleagues for answers. The result was customers spending a much longer time on the phone than necessary, not to mention the answers were not as professional as they should have been. 

Explanation: The staff received all the required answers from their managers via email during their induction training and during subsequent meetings, yet it was obvious this method did not work.  

The solution: What they need is a knowledge-base structured around products and

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COLUMN: Rolling Stone’s 500 best albums list lacks vital information


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Maybe it’s time we stop ranking stuff.

Rolling Stone’s updated list, which came out Sept. 22, of the 500 greatest albums of all time is just angering. The list ranks what Rolling Stone considers to be the best albums ever made. Their original list came out in 2003, and a slightly updated version came out in 2012. 

It felt like the people who put the list together just wanted to make readers mad. And they admitted to that in the introduction to the list.

“Over the years, it’s been the most widely read  — and argued over — feature in the history of the magazine,” Rolling Stone said in an article.

So, yeah. If they wanted readers to argue, they sure got that. But maybe not for the reasons they think.

No coherent arguments can be made about where each album ranks when the people who put together the list

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Bill would restrict access to judges’ personal information

NEWARK, N.J. (AP) — In the wake of the fatal shooting of a federal judge’s son in New Jersey, bi-partisan legislation seeks to restrict online access to judges’ personal information.

Twenty-year-old Daniel Anderl, the son of U.S. District Judge Esther Salas, was shot and killed inside the family’s home on July 19 by a gunman posing as a delivery driver. Salas’ husband, Mark Anderl, was seriously wounded and is recovering. Salas was in another part of the house and wasn’t injured.

The assailant, Roy Den Hollander, was a disgruntled lawyer who had posted anti-feminist screeds and who had a document with information about a dozen female judges around the country. He was involved in a gender bias case before Salas, in which he challenged the U.S. military’s male-only draft registration requirement.

Den Hollander killed himself in upstate New York shortly after shooting Anderl.

Democratic New Jersey Sen. Bob Menendez, who

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Bill Would Restrict Access to Judges’ Personal Information | Political News

NEWARK, N.J. (AP) — In the wake of the fatal shooting of a federal judge’s son in New Jersey, bi-partisan legislation seeks to restrict online access to judges’ personal information.

Twenty-year-old Daniel Anderl, the son of U.S. District Judge Esther Salas, was shot and killed inside the family’s home on July 19 by a gunman posing as a delivery driver. Salas’ husband, Mark Anderl, was seriously wounded and is recovering. Salas was in another part of the house and wasn’t injured.

The assailant, Roy Den Hollander, was a disgruntled lawyer who had posted anti-feminist screeds and who had a document with information about a dozen female judges around the country. He was involved in a gender bias case before Salas, in which he challenged the U.S. military’s male-only draft registration requirement.

Den Hollander killed himself in upstate New York shortly after shooting Anderl.

Democratic New Jersey Sen. Bob Menendez, who

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A hacker published thousands of students’ grades and private information after a Nevada school district refused to pay ransom

<p class="copyright">Motortion/Getty Images</p>
  • A hacker published grades and personal information of thousands of Las Vegas students after school district officials refused to pay a ransom in exchange for the information.

  • The leaked information included students’ names, social security numbers, addresses, and some financial information, and were published on an online hacker forum this week, a cybersecurity analyst told Business Insider.

  • Las Vegas’ Clark County School District announced earlier this month that some of its files were compromised by a hacker using ransomware and that law enforcement was investigating.

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Last month, Las Vegas’ largest public school district announced that a hacker compromised some of its files using ransomware and was holding the files hostage while demanding a ransom payment.

Now, a hacker has published files containing students’ grades and personal information after school district officials refused to pay the ransom.

Brett Callow, a threat analyst

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Beware These 18 Industries and Companies Selling Your Information

When you applied for a driver’s license or registered your car, you gave personally identifying information to your local DMV — and probably didn’t think twice about it. You might not know that thanks to a 1994 law, the DMV can sell your information, including your home address, to private investigators. The DMV also sells information to other third parties, including insurance companies, tow companies, credit reporting agencies and research databases, documents obtained by Motherboard show. Some states’ DMVs make tens of millions of dollars a year by selling this data, including California’s, which raked in $50 million in 2019 by selling personal info, Vice reported. Although some lawmakers have questioned this practice, the DMV’s activities are within legal bounds.

The DMV is not the only entity that’s selling your personal information — these 17 other companies might also give your information away for the right price. Find out who’s

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Newsroom or PAC? Liberal group muddies online information wars

Rep. Max Rose, one of the most vulnerable Democrats in Congress this November, couldn’t have written a better headline himself.

“Rep. Max Rose Deploys With National Guard to Get Hospital Ready For Coronavirus Patients,” read an April 17 article about the freshman congressman from New York. The article — boosted into circulation in New York by thousands of dollars in targeted Facebook ads — was mostly a rewrite of the congressman’s press release from the previous day. The same thing happened the next month: A May 28 press release touting coronavirus legislation of Rose’s quickly turned into an article with almost exactly the same headline as the release.

The articles and Facebook ad dollars look like the efforts of a run-of-the-mill political group. But they are actually from a news outlet: CourierNewsroom.com, also known as Courier, which was created and funded by the Democratic-aligned digital organization Acronym. Courier has spent

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