Job

It was his dream job. He never thought he’d be bribing doctors and wearing a wire for the feds.

When Oswald Bilotta landed his dream job as a sales representative for Novartis Pharmaceuticals in 1999, he thought he’d be doing good for society while doing well for himself and his family.

He had no idea that just over a decade later, he’d be part of a vast federal investigation into kickbacks at Novartis and that he’d be paying cash bribes to doctors while wearing a wire for prosecutors.

On July 1, Ozzie Bilotta’s yearslong effort to blow the whistle at Novartis paid off. The Justice Department announced a $678 million settlement with the company over improper inducements it made to doctors to prescribe 10 of the company’s drugs, including the anti-hypertension drug Lotrel. The deal represents the biggest whistleblower settlement under the federal anti-kickback law, Bilotta’s lawyer said.

“I felt like you needed to take drastic action to turn this system upside down and make it more legit,” Bilotta,

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2020 graduates face uncertain job market with hope

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – If everything had gone according to plan, Missy Wood thought she’d have a job helping at-risk youths by now. 

Wood, a recent graduate of Middle Tennessee State University, saw her internship with Court-Appointed Special Advocates end abruptly in March as the COVID-19 pandemic took root in Tennessee. She started applying for jobs with the Department of Children’s Services and similar organizations in April.

By the time she graduated in May, new job postings for her chosen career had all but disappeared.

Wood is one of the thousands of graduates across the nation who face a turbulent job market amid the novel coronavirus pandemic. More than 47 million Americans have filed jobless benefit claims since the middle of March, according to the Labor Department.  

Eli Kellum, 7, climbs on the back of babysitter Missy Wood in the Kellum family's backyard in Murfreesboro on June 18, 2020, as the two play on the trampoline. Wood has been looking for work since April but has not been able to find any child-focused social work positions since graduating from MTSU in May. After the pandemic hit, job postings for her planned career seemed to disappear.
Eli Kellum, 7, climbs on the back of babysitter Missy Wood in the Kellum family’s backyard in Murfreesboro on June 18, 2020, as the
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Tech employees are selling referrals online to job candidates for under $50 to help them get hired at Google, Facebook, and other industry giants

Rooftop Slushie was reportedly named after a character in HBO's "Silicon Valley" TV show depicting a strikingly accurate portrayal of the tech industry.
Rooftop Slushie was reportedly named after a character in HBO’s “Silicon Valley” TV show depicting a strikingly accurate portrayal of the tech industry.

Warner Bros/IMDb

  • A website is allowing prospective tech employees to anonymously purchase a job referral from existing tech workers for $20 to $50 apiece.

  • Rooftop Slushie, created by the makers of techie chat favorite Blind, has hosted 11,000 referral transactions since it was launched in 2019. Facebook and Google referrals are the most popular.

  • The “vendors” are established employees at companies like Amazon, Google, and Twitter who can become verified on the website and vet candidate submissions before accepting the deal.

  • The site’s product manager told One Zero that the service helps improve a skilled candidate’s chances of getting hired, but critics say paying for and accepting payment for a job referral is unethical.

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The hiring process in the tech

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9 Questions to Be Ready to Answer in a Remote Job Interview

Remote work has been on the rise for years, but the COVID-19 pandemic has finally shoved it into the limelight.

Being forced to send workers home to slow the spread of the disease throughout 2020 and into 2021 will likely cause many employers to rethink their positions on remote work and open up more work-from-home positions.

“A lot of people have been transitioning into working remotely solely because they have the option to work while traveling, or while trying to be safe from the virus,” said Carolyn Cairns, marketing manager at Dubai- and UAE-based business setup firm Creation Business Consultants.

Employers across all industries, whether they’re new to managing remote workforces or have long been remote operations, want to know how employees will handle working from home.

So if you’re applying for a work-from-home position, be prepared to answer these remote job interview questions.

9 Questions You Might Have to

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Coronavirus: How to find a job after a layoff

As the unemployment rate hits its highest since the Great Depression while the coronavirus pandemic wreaks havoc on the U.S. economy, millions of Americans may find themselves out of a job for a few months or longer.

While finding a job in such an environment may seem intimidating, you shouldn’t bring the emotional baggage from the layoff to the job search process.

“Almost everybody loses their job at least once in their career and these days, job loss is very common,” said Stacey Staaterman, leadership and career coach. “You might worry that you look like a loser, but the world won’t see it that way, unless you bring sad sack energy into the search process.”

Here are a few steps you can take to make the job search process less intimidating and increase your chances of getting hired.

While finding a job in such an environment may seem intimidating, you shouldn’t bring the emotional baggage from the layoff to the job search process. Photo: Getty Creative
While finding a job in such an environment may seem intimidating, you
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Get Health Insurance If You Lost Job During Pandemic

Consumer Reports has no financial relationship with advertisers on this site.

If you’re one of the estimated 27 million people who lost their health insurance along with your job during the coronavirus pandemic, your chance to buy your own health insurance is approaching a deadline. 

Typically, after losing your job, you have 60 days to buy an Affordable Care Act plan through your state marketplace. That deadline is coming up for anyone who lost their job in April or May.

You have a bit more time if you elect to continue employer coverage under the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act. That law allows you to keep your plan, though you will have to pay the full premium out of your own pocket. While you usually have 60 days after losing job-based insurance to choose COBRA, the Department of Health and Human Services said last month that it would permit COBRA

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Music Biz College Graduates Keep Their Heads up, Despite Grim Job Market

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Genna Batson, who graduated last month from Syracuse University’s Bandier Program with a music business degree, was about as poised for a career in the concert industry as a senior without a nepotistic benefactor could be. She’d focused on the touring business early in her college days, serving as talent buyer and co-director of the school’s concert board, and held internships at industry titans Live Nation, Red Light Management and Superfly, where last summer she interned as a sponsorship coordinator for the Outside Lands festival in San Francisco. She’d secured a contracted position for this summer in the same role, and a permanent job looked promising.

But then came the pandemic, which in a matter of days flattened the entire concert industry — the financial engine of the music business, which touring trade Pollstar had projected would generate $12.2 billion in box office

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