lockdown

A third of Brits will be ‘worse off’ after lockdown

Nearly half of Brits are worried about their as finances support disappears and they're left with debt. (Gareth Fuller/PA Archive/PA Images)
Nearly half of Brits are worried about their as finances support disappears and they’re left with debt. (Gareth Fuller/PA Archive/PA Images)

A third of Brits will be financially “worse off” as the UK comes out of its COVID-19 lockdown, research suggests.

With the government’s furlough scheme set to end on 31 October and other forms of financial support also disappearing, one in three Brits told SimpleUsability the lockdown period has had a negative long-term impact on their finances.

According to the market researcher’s survey of 1,072 people, nearly three quarters (74%) have been furloughed, while over a fifth (22%) have relieved on government grants, such as the self-employment government support scheme.

Meanwhile, 6% have relied on government loans, and 8% have received other forms of financial support, such as a mortgage holiday or universal credit.

READ MORE: Parents set to save £11m a week on energy bills as kids return

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One in nine pupils absent from school as lack of testing drives fears of ‘lockdown by default’

Absence rate more than double pre-Covid times last Thursday (Oli Scarff/AFP via Getty Images)
Absence rate more than double pre-Covid times last Thursday (Oli Scarff/AFP via Getty Images)

More than one in nine pupils were absent from school last week, government figures show, as teachers and unions warned a lack of available coronavirus tests meant more schools would be forced to close, leading to “lockdown by default”.

After schools reopened in England following six months of closure during the pandemic, education secretary Gavin Williamson touted the fact that 99.9 per cent of schools were open to at least some pupils.

But absence rates were more than double that of pre-Covid times, with Department for Education (DfE) statistics suggesting 12 per cent of pupils were not in attendance on 10 September.

Some 92 per cent of state schools were fully open, the DfE estimates, providing face-to-face teaching for pupils all day with no groups self-isolating. In these schools, 90 per cent of pupils were in

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How to manage your mental health during lockdown

The National Domestic Abuse helpline has seen a 25 per cent increase in calls since lockdown began (Getty)
The National Domestic Abuse helpline has seen a 25 per cent increase in calls since lockdown began (Getty)

On 23 March prime minister Boris Johnson implemented a nationwide UK lockdown, which saw people confined to their homes.

Only able to leave the house for a number of essential reasons: getting food or medicine, once-daily exercise or travelling to work as a key worker.

Although the restrictions are now starting to ease in England, many people will have spent weeks at home – and are still unable to meet friends and family.

A long period of isolation may well have been a necessary measure to protect public health against Covid-19 but it has been acknowledged that it could also have a detrimental impact on people’s mental health.

The World Health Organisation (WHO) released a mental health guide for people who are self-isolating saying: “This time of crisis is generating stress in

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Domestic abuse workers reveal the trauma of trying to help victims during lockdown

  <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Shutterstock</span></span>
Shutterstock

It became clear, very early on in the coronavirus pandemic, that lockdown would put domestic abuse victims and survivors at increased risk. But the pandemic has also taken its toll on the people who help them. I spoke to people on the front line to find out how they were coping.

Over the past few months I have been working on a film based around more than 20 interviews with people working in domestic abuse services in the UK as well as people working for charities, parliamentarians, NHS professionals and members of the police.

In July 2020, Labour MP Jess Phillips told me about how she spoke to a small organisation in Liverpool that had just four support workers dealing with more than 750 domestic abuse cases, some of which were very high risk. And indeed, the people I spoke to emphasised how difficult it has been to adapt,

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9 ways to prepare for the next COVID-19 lockdown

After giving up spring break and summer barbecues, cooped-up Americans are looking forward to the day when things go back to normal. But COVID-19 isn’t like a natural disaster that strikes once, then fades away.

Several states have paused or walked back their plans to reopen, as new hot spots emerge and the number of active cases remains high.

Now health experts are warning that a second round of lockdowns may be necessary as the fall flu season begins, classes resume and cool weather drives people into cramped indoor spaces.

still feeling drained after round one.” data-reactid=”35″Even a series of smaller, more localized lockdowns could spell trouble for Americans’ livelihoods, especially for those workers still feeling drained after round one.

But you still have time to prepare. Here are nine things you can do to protect your finances ahead of a second wave.

1. Keep saving

As the first

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Big tech and lockdown essentials soar

As the novel coronavirus pandemic reshapes American life, some companies have found business booming in the new normal, even as the rest of the economy recedes.

could close for good during the pandemic. Meanwhile, some of the larger companies have actually seen new gains amid the pandemic.” data-reactid=”13″It has been a bleak year for many businesses in the U.S., and experts warn that up to a third of all American small businesses could close for good during the pandemic. Meanwhile, some of the larger companies have actually seen new gains amid the pandemic.

stock market rally that has left a number of economists scratching their heads, experts say.” data-reactid=”14″This divide, which some have described as a “K-shaped recovery,” has been fueled in part by government relief actions and publicly-traded companies benefitting from a stock market rally that has left a number of economists scratching their heads,

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Tesco’s 16,000 jobs drive to reward lockdown temps

Tesco will create 16,000 new permanent jobs after lockdown led to “exceptional growth” in its online business.

The new posts will include 10,000 staff to pick customer orders from shelves and 3,000 delivery drivers.

The recruitment drive reflects the shift to online shopping, which was accelerated by lockdown.

Tesco said it expected many of the roles to go to staff who joined them on a temporary basis at the start of the pandemic.

Supermarkets scrambled to meet a surge in demand for online deliveries while the UK was in lockdown.

Tesco said online customer numbers had risen from around 600,000 at the start of the pandemic, to nearly 1.5 million.

Before the pandemic, around 9% of Tesco’s sales were online. Now, online sales amount to 16% of sales, and are expected to be worth over £5.5bn this year, the company said.

Online grocery orders now make up 16% of Tesco’s

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Lockdown budgeting exploited by fraudsters

Fraudsters have been intercepting people’s attempts to make their money go further during lockdown, with investment scams on the increase.

Fraud attempts in general were up 66% in the first half of the year compared with the previous six months, Barclays said.

The bank also reported an unprecedented spike in investment scams, up 49% in July compared with June.

Many people used time at home during lockdown to organise their finances.

Barclays said that many people had been researching online for a lucrative return on their investments. Savvy fraudsters have enticed them with offers that are too good to be true.

“Fraudsters have undoubtedly taken advantage of the nation’s uncertainty during the pandemic, in what is just another moment in the historical evolution of scams,” said Jim Winters, head of fraud at Barclays.

“The immediacy of our lives, even during lockdown, has allowed scammers to harness the constantly changing news

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Mykonos rejects fresh lockdown as Greece sees cases rise

A pilgrim crawls from the port to the Holy Church of Panagia of Tinos, on the Aegean island of Tinos, Greece - AP
A pilgrim crawls from the port to the Holy Church of Panagia of Tinos, on the Aegean island of Tinos, Greece – AP

The popular Greek island of Mykonos is pushing back against new lockdown restrictions that see bars and restaurants forced to close at midnight.

“Everyone has come [to Mykonos] to eat their food, to entertain themselves, swim in the sea. At this moment, we are fooling them,” bar owner Stavros Grimplas told the Associated Press. “We told them ‘come to Greece’ and Greece has shut down.”

The new measures to stem a rising number of coronavirus cases on the islands and across the country come as Greece is rumoured to be next to be added to the UK’s quarantine list. 

But businesses on Mykonos say the rules should not target legitimate business but illegal parties instead. Owners have signed an angry letter accusing the government of wanting “to

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‘My mum’s advice saved me from lockdown anxiety’

My Money is a series looking at how people spend their money – and the sometimes tough decisions they have to make. Here, Lexy Oliver from Cheshire takes us through a week in her life during the coronavirus pandemic.

Lexy is 27 and lives in Cuddington, Cheshire, with her husband Jonny, also 27, and their cat Bobby. She is the fifth generation to work in her family business, a delicatessen owned by her father. Jonny works as a data scientist for a holiday lettings agency. Lexy says there are no better staff discounts than good food and holidays!

The Covid-19 situation has certainly had an impact on their finances over the last few months. Lexy was furloughed for 10 weeks, and Jonny has just returned to work having been on furlough since April. During lockdown, when neither of them were in work, they were down over £1,000 a month in

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