Months

It’s been 6 months since Harry and Meghan moved to LA post-Megxit: Are they happy now?

It’s been six months since Prince Harry and Duchess Meghan moved to Southern California to build a new kind of royal lifestyle, one bolstered by more independence, more control over their image and new Hollywood business partners.

So, Harry and Meg, how’s it going so far?

Meghan, the Los Angeles-born former actress, hinted about how she feels in recent online interviews. “It’s good to be home,” she sighed contentedly.

And that was before the news on Sept 2 that the couple signed a multi-year mega deal with Netflix to become Hollywood producers of scripted series, docu-series, documentaries, features and children’s programming. For the first time ever, a British royal couple is set to become players in the global entertainment industry.

“This is a massive unparalleled historical deal,” enthused Jonathan Shalit, chairman/founder of InterTalent Rights Group, who bills himself on Twitter as “London’s Most Influential Talent Manager.” He says he knows

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27% of UK firms to make redundancies over next 12 months

Some 7% of small businesses said they don’t expect to survive. Photo: Getty
Some 7% of small businesses said they don’t expect to survive. Photo: Getty

Some 27% of UK employers are expected to make job cuts over the next 12 months while 13% say they will ask staff to take a pay cut.

That’s according to a survey by investment group MBH Corporation, conducted online between 21 and 23 August 2020, of senior executives and managers at a range of UK-based small to medium enterprises (SME).

Some 7% of respondents said they don’t expect to survive and 13% anticipate closing part of their business. Some 6% anticipate they will have to sell their businesses. 

“Whilst there is no sugar coating for the effect the COVID-19 crisis has had on the small business ecosystem, it is pleasing to see how many were able to leverage off the government support and are positive about the way forward,” said Callum Laing, CEO of MBH Corporation.

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Detroit Salvation Army Begins Red Kettle Campaign 2 Months Early

SOUTHFIELD, MI — The Salvation Army of Metro Detroit launched its Red Kettle Campaign Monday, marking the earliest the nonprofit has ever begun its annual Christmas fundraiser in its 133-year history of serving southeast Michigan.

The Salvation Army’s ability to raise vital funds to serve those in need is at risk this year due to the impact and economic hardships caused by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, according to the non-profit. It is calling on supporters to donate or volunteer their time to aid The Salvation Army in reaching its $8 million fundraising goal. All funds raised will directly benefit communities throughout Macomb, Oakland and Wayne counties, the non-profit said.

“With more people facing hardship this year, the need to serve those most vulnerable is greater than ever,” said Major Tim Meyer, general secretary, metro Detroit area commander and regional chief operating officer for The Salvation Army Eastern Michigan Division. “2020

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After Months Of Delay, Tens Of Thousands Sign Up For New MIT Sloan Program

MIT Sloan School of Management announced the MITx MicroMasters Program in Finance in January as a way to appeal to those wanting to enhance their financial skillset, whether recent graduates, early- to mid-stage professionals or others eyeing a career in finance. The remote-learning program was designed as a way to fast-track a master’s degree in finance from MIT Sloan.

Two months later, the world stopped. As coronavirus stamped a giant question mark on the entire graduate business education universe, MIT’s new finance program became a casualty. It had been scheduled to start April 1, but it was put on hold as the Sloan School — like every other business school in the United States — grappled with the upheaval of the fast-spreading and little-understood virus.

Now, four weeks before the newly scheduled start of the program — which will be a full six months after its intended launch — MIT

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NYC welfare benefit hotline is a mess months after benefits offices shut down, advocates claim

The shutdown of city welfare offices due to the pandemic meant many New Yorkers would have to rely on their phones to apply for benefits like food stamps and job assistance.

But that hasn’t been working out very well, according to the Urban Justice Center, which recently conducted an audit of the city hotline devoted to those types of calls.

The Justice Center, which is focused on helping people secure public benefits, found that more than 50% of calls to the city Human Resources Administration were dropped and 20% had wait times of more than eight minutes.

Callers also had difficulty getting through to translators and had to struggle through English-only pre-recorded messages, according to the group, which conducted the audit through calls it made between June 23 and Aug. 4.

“People need to be able to get in touch with the city administration that is responsible for administering critical

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Trump’s executive order on unemployment could take months to implement; hundreds quarantining in Ga. school district

After weeks of stalled congressional negotiations over a new coronavirus stimulus package, President Donald Trump signed a series of executive orders Saturday evening as the U.S. was approaching 5 million cases of COVID-19.

Trump, repeatedly referring to the coronavirus as the “China virus,” said the orders would provide an additional $400 per week in unemployment benefits, suspend payments on some student loans through the end of the year and protect renters from being evicted from their homes.

“We’re coming back very strong. We’re doing well with the virus,” Trump said, even as the U.S. was leading nations worldwide in confirmed cases and deaths from COVID-19 and confirmed an additional 50,000 new cases Friday.

Top Democrats criticized the move and unemployment experts were left confused about how it might be implemented, speculating it could take months for states to figure it out.

Meanwhile, South Dakota was hosting one of the largest

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3 things to know about voting 3 months ahead of the 2020 election

The 2020 election is just three months away, which means it’s time for voters, particularly young voters, to make sure they are informed about the races and registered to vote.

Millennials and Generation Z will comprise 40% of voters in this year’s election, according to Rock the Vote, a nonpartisan, nonprofit organization that works to get young people to the polls.

While voter turnout among young people is historically low, it has been on the rise.

In the 2018 election, voter turnout among 18- to 29-year-olds was 36%, an increase from 20% in 2014, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

MORE: Taylor Swift encourages fans to register to vote in 2020 election: ‘This is so important’

Over the past few months, the lives of many young people have been turned upside down by the coronavirus pandemic — which canceled schools, sports and activities and slowed job opportunities — and the

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As ‘covid couples’ reach five months of togetherness, Connecticut jewelers see jump in engagement ring sales

If sales of engagement rings are any indication, a growing number of couples hunkered down in quarantine during the coronavirus pandemic are asking themselves: why not?

In Connecticut, jewelers say they’ve seen a noticeable spike in demand for engagement rings from mid-March to July compared with previous years.

For the first two months of quarantine — if things were going well — couples browsed online. In May, as jewelry and other retail stores opened under Gov. Lamont’s Phase 1 guidelines, future brides and grooms scouted in person.

At Lux, Bond & Green’s six retail locations in Connecticut and Massachusetts, co-owner John Green estimates his engagement ring business is up 25% from the same period last year.

“When we shut down in March, we got emails and an appointment requests,” John Green, co-owner of Lux, Bond & Green, said. “We made special appointments and lots of social distancing and masks and

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Small businesses need ‘flexible repayment solutions’ to survive next 18 months

Photo: Dominic Lipinski/PA Wire/PA Images
Photo: Dominic Lipinski/PA Wire/PA Images

Small businesses need “flexible debt repayment schemes” in order to survive the next 18 months, a leading industry report claims.

The quarterly SME lending monitor, by online business funding marketplace Funding Xchange, highlights the need to address the stresses currently experienced by up to 40% of the businesses who have borrowed from alternative lenders.

Funding Xchange is an online portal which directs small businesses unable to access funding from their high street bank to other lending providers.

The data shows two out of every five businesses that currently have loans from “alternative lenders” are now in discussion with the lenders, as they are struggling to fulfil their repayment programmes as a result of the coronavirus lockdown impact.

“Alternative lenders” have provided another option for business who are unable to access funds from their high street bank.

They established themselves following the last financial crash, as

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Small businesses need ‘flexile repayment solutions’ to survive next 18 months

Photo: Dominic Lipinski/PA Wire/PA Images
Photo: Dominic Lipinski/PA Wire/PA Images

Small businesses need “flexible debt repayment schemes” in order to survive the next 18 months, a leading industry report claims.

The quarterly SME lending monitor, by online business funding marketplace Funding Xchange, highlights the need to address the stresses currently experienced by up to 40% of the businesses who have borrowed from alternative lenders.

Funding Xchange is an online portal which directs small businesses unable to access funding from their high street bank to other lending providers.

The data shows two out of every five businesses that currently have loans from “alternative lenders” are now in discussion with the lenders, as they are struggling to fulfil their repayment programmes as a result of the coronavirus lockdown impact.

“Alternative lenders” have provided another option for business who are unable to access funds from their high street bank.

They established themselves following the last financial crash, as

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