parents

25 Things Only Parents in the 1990s Will Remember

Compared to what parenting looks like now, 1990s moms and dads had it pretty good. Just 20 years ago, there were no cyberbullies, and the world was still a relatively safe place where kids could hang out at the park without supervision.

Though a lot has changed in the decades since, one thing that smartphones and increased safety precautions can never take away from 1990s parents is their memories. And to help you relive your glory days, we’ve rounded up some of the surprising, hilarious, and shocking things only parents of the ’90s will remember. And for more throwback memories, check out the 100 Photos That Kids Born After 2000 Will Never Understand.

1

Disconnecting kids from the internet was as easy as picking up the phone.

Obsolete, Dial-up internet
Obsolete, Dial-up internet

Getting online in the 1990s required a dial-up connection, which was infamously slow and clunky and could be interrupted at

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Am I Too Comfortable Living With My Parents?

Linne Halpern, HelloGiggles

With September somehow fully underway, I have officially been living at home in Ohio for six months. It is the longest stretch of time—by far—that I have spent under my parents’ roof since I left for college over six years ago.

This was never the plan.

You see, I used to live in New York City, where I was accustomed to the “busy” lifestyle of many cosmopolitan millennials. My weekdays were packed with “working breakfasts” and PR launches as a freelance writer, while my weekends were filled with pilates classes and dinners with friends. I enjoyed this life and had no intention of abandoning it.

But, when the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic hit, it all started to look less shiny. The thought of being stuck inside my 300-square-foot studio—alone—incited panic. With nowhere else to go and a craving for parental support, I headed home in mid-March. I arrived

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Trump, DeVos raise school choice in appeal to vexed parents

As millions of American children start the school year online, the Trump administration is hoping to convert their parents’ frustration and anger into newfound support for school choice policies that Education Secretary Betsy DeVos has long championed but struggled to advance nationally.

DeVos and President Donald Trump have repeatedly invoked school choice as the solution to parents’ woes. If public schools fail to open, they say, parents should get a cut of the district’s federal funding to send their children to private schools or for home schooling, learning pods or other options that have arisen during the coronavirus pandemic.

For Trump, it’s seen as a potential lifeline to Black and Hispanic voters, who are more likely to support vouchers and other school choice options, polls have found. Speaking at the White House in July, Trump declared that “there is nothing that the African American community wants more than school choice.”

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Majority of Parents Want High Schools to Teach Personal Finance

A late August survey from U.S. News & World Report shows that more than 83% of parents believe high schools don’t do enough to help their kids become financially savvy.

But that doesn’t mean parents don’t try to do their part to educate their children about money. When asked which money concepts they’ve taught their kids, more than 68% of survey respondents focused on the importance of saving, and 53% had tackled the concept of budgeting.

Here is a breakdown of results for other concepts:

— Comparison shopping: 45.3%.

— Avoiding online scams: 41.2%.

— Using credit: 27.8%.

— Investing: 27.5%.

Only 19% of parents say they haven’t tried to help their kids become financially literate. When you think about the huge decisions high school seniors have to make about financing college, the more they know about personal finance and debt, the better.

[Read: Best Secured Credit Cards.]

State

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Parents Got More Time Off. Then the Backlash Started.

A Los Angeles Unified School District student uses his fingers to solve a math problem while taking an online class at Boys & Girls Club of Hollywood in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
A Los Angeles Unified School District student uses his fingers to solve a math problem while taking an online class at Boys & Girls Club of Hollywood in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

OAKLAND, Calif. — When the coronavirus closed schools and child care centers and turned American parenthood into a multitasking nightmare, many tech companies rushed to help their employees. They used their comfortable profit margins to extend workers new benefits, including extra time off for parents to help them care for their children.

It wasn’t long before employees without children started to ask: What about us?

At a recent companywide meeting, Facebook employees repeatedly argued that work policies created in response to COVID-19 “have primarily benefited parents.” At Twitter, a fight erupted on an internal message board after a worker who didn’t have children at home accused another employee, who was taking a leave to care for

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3 online safety tips for kids and parents

Like so many parents across the country, Skye McLain wrestled with the idea of virtual learning for her son, Jett, 7, as school resumed amidst the coronavirus pandemic this fall.

“The thought of him being required to be in front of a screen for multiple hours a day was very unnerving for me,” the Texas-based mom told TODAY Parents. “I gave homeschooling quite a bit of consideration, because I felt that it would give us more flexibility when it came to screen time and to lessen the chances of his exposure to the inappropriate content he could easily find or be shown on the Internet.”

While McLain ultimately decided for Jett to attend second grade virtually through the public school system, internet safety has remained a top priority in their at-home classroom.

“[Schools] are going to do everything in their own power to provide a safe place to conduct a

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11 Remote Learning Truths From Parents Whose Kids Have Started School

Many kids across the country are starting the school year from the confines of their own homes, as both large school districts and individual parents are keeping students remote this fall. 

What can parents expect this fall? What’s been working and what hasn’t? A warning: It doesn’t seem to be going too great overall. 

We asked parents in our Facebook community whose kids have started the school year virtually about what we should know. Read on to find out what they had to say. 

“I live in Metairie, Louisiana, and my son is attending first grade virtually for at least the first nine weeks. He started yesterday, and naturally there were hiccups with the format. However, I am truly flabbergasted that in general the district seemed extremely underprepared for a virtual learning option. … Teachers seem overwhelmed by the virtual format. So far, the majority of the class periods have

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UK parents take control of their children’s education as the homeschooling option becomes the answer to classroom coronavirus fears

Leo and Espen are assisted by their mother Moira as they homeschool and navigate online learning resources provided by their infant school in the village of Marsden, northern England, on March 23, 2020 

<p class=Oli Scarff/AFP via Getty Images

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Leo and Espen are assisted by their mother Moira as they homeschool and navigate online learning resources provided by their infant school in the village of Marsden, northern England, on March 23, 2020
  • Homeschooling is on the rise in the UK as uncertainties around the reopening of schools has left some parents feeling like they need to take matters into their own hands.

  • A recent poll found that 30% of UK parents were not planning to send their children back to school, of which 91% said they would continue with homeschooling for the foreseeable future.

  • Reasons for homeschooling vary, whether its fears that schools aren’t opening or because children find it easier to work from home.

  • Professional tutoring and homeschooling groups have also seen a rise in interest, with one group telling Business Insider that there’s been

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Here’s how parents can cut back-to-school costs for remote learning

True to form, the pandemic has infiltrated another time-honored tradition: back-to-school season.

With millions of Americans already struggling financially, sending children back to school got more expensive with spending up nearly $100 from the previous year to an average of $789.49 per family, according to the National Retail Federation (NRF).

“By any measure, this is an unprecedented year with great uncertainty, including how students will get their education this fall, whether they are in kindergarten or college,” NRF President and CEO Matthew Shay said.

Pandemic-era back to school spending is forecasted to top the $100 billion mark for the first time. (Photo: Getty)
Pandemic-era back to school spending is forecasted to top the $100 billion mark for the first time. (Photo: Getty)

Parents of school-aged children are now spending more money on supplies, so their young scholars are poised to learn online, in person, or a hybrid of the two — with the understanding that their current arrangement might change at a moment’s notice.

As a result of the

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