protect

This Tool Could Protect Your Photos From Facial Recognition

Images provided by the SAND Lab at the University of Chicago show before and after photographs of, from left, Jessica Simpson, Gwyneth Paltrow and Patrick Dempsey that were cloaked by the Fawkes team. (SAND Lab, University of Chicago via The New York Times)
Images provided by the SAND Lab at the University of Chicago show before and after photographs of, from left, Jessica Simpson, Gwyneth Paltrow and Patrick Dempsey that were cloaked by the Fawkes team. (SAND Lab, University of Chicago via The New York Times)

In recent years, companies have been prowling the web for public photos associated with people’s names that they can use to build enormous databases of faces and improve their facial-recognition systems, adding to a growing sense that personal privacy is being lost, bit by digital bit.

A startup called Clearview AI, for example, scraped billions of online photos to build a tool for police that could lead them from a face to a Facebook account, revealing a person’s identity.

Now researchers are trying to foil those systems. A team of computer engineers at the University of Chicago has developed a tool that disguises photos with pixel-level changes

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5 emergency documents that can protect you during the pandemic

As the U.S. continues struggling with how to stop the spread of COVID-19, it’s critical to consider whether you have the right emergency documents.

No matter if you live in a coronavirus hot spot or don’t know anyone with COVID-19, there’s never been a better time to understand how different legal documents can protect you.

Here are five types of emergency documents that will help you and your family make essential health care decisions and manage your finances during an unexpected illness or accident.

1. Last will

Your last will is a document that communicates your final wishes after your death. Every adult should have a will. Otherwise, the courts decide what happens to your possessions and who will take care of any minor children who survive you.

You don’t need a lawyer to create a will, but if you have a high net worth or many different types of

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Protect yourself from identity theft with 5 crucial steps

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Here's how to empower yourself to protect your personal information online. (Photo: Getty)
Here’s how to empower yourself to protect your personal information online. (Photo: Getty)

We’re all extra vulnerable these days, and I’m not just talking about COVID-19 itself. Online data breaches have escalated during pandemic-related lockdowns, according to Tech Republic, and everything from your financial information to your identity could be at risk. 

“We’re now in totally uncharted waters, especially when it comes to hacking and identity theft,” Adam Levin, cyber security expert and founder of Cyberscout, tells Yahoo Life. “Breaches have become the third certainty in life behind death and taxes.” He says that identity thieves “prey on vulnerability and distraction,” like working from home while running a household and other major upheavals in routine.

Meanwhile,

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How the U.S. seeks to protect children’s privacy online

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – TikTok is under investigation for allegedly violating a settlement reached with U.S. authorities last year that resolved charges the popular app broke rules governing how children’s personal information is treated online.

The U.S. Federal Trade Commission, which enforces the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act, or COPPA, and the Justice Department, which often files court actions for the FTC, have opened a preliminary investigation into the matter involving the China-based video-sharing app.

Under rules dating to 1998 legislation, COPPA requires websites to get parental permission to collect data on children under the age of 13. Websites or online services are also expected to ban third parties from collecting the data.

COPPA also applies to mobile apps, gaming platforms and internet-connected toys, among others.

Under pressure from the FTC, TikTok, owned by China’s ByteDance, agreed in early 2019 to pay a $5.7 million civil penalty for violating COPPA by

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NC not doing enough to protect immigrant farmworkers from coronavirus, advocates say

Reported coronavirus cases are rising among seasonal farmworkers living in migrant worker housing, a group setting like nursing homes that the state is watching.

On Tuesday, 128 new COVID-19 cases across four farms were reported through June, according to the N.C. Department of Health and Human Services.

That was more than double the 49 cases previously reported by The News & Observer. They bring the total number of infected farmworkers living in the camps to 177.

Six farms had active outbreaks in June compared to five active outbreaks reported in May. DHHS defines an outbreak as more than two cases but is only reporting them at facilities with at least 10 residents.

The cases reported are among seasonal immigrant farmworkers from Mexico who come to work in the United States on a temporary visa and live in grower-provided housing. Other infected workers who live in private residences not on farm

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High Risk for Coronavirus | Protect Yourself

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As the COVID-19 pandemic continues unfolding around the globe, people who are at higher risk for severe disease need to take special care.

COVID-19 appears to cause mild to moderate symptoms in most people who are infected. And some people seem to have no apparent effects from the virus.

But the older you are, the greater your risk for hospitalization, admission to an intensive care unit, being placed on a ventilator, and death, according to new guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 

For instance, people in their 50s are at higher risk than those in their 40s, and those in their 60s and 70s are at greater risk than those in their 50s, the CDC says. People 85 and older are at the greatest risk. (In the U.S., about 8 in 10 deaths from COVID-19 are

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Coronavirus drove a boom in virtual content; to protect artists, copyright law must catch up

John Krasinski's YouTube show "Some Good News" operated on a deep well of coronavirus good will that won't likely extend to its new platform, CBS. <span class="copyright">(YouTube)</span>
John Krasinski’s YouTube show “Some Good News” operated on a deep well of coronavirus good will that won’t likely extend to its new platform, CBS. (YouTube)

On April 19, Rainn Wilson (a.k.a. Dwight Schrute) appeared on John Krasinski’s YouTube show “Some Good News,” and warned his former “Office” cast member not to stream a Chance the Rapper song without first getting permission from the artist or the publishing company. Krasinski then brought Chance himself onto the show, and he gave the green light.

The COVID-19 pandemic has generated this type of abundant good will across media and entertainment businesses: DJs are spinning music free online; Alex “A-Rod” Rodriguez and Jennifer Lopez are posting dances to popular songs on TikTok, Broadway performers are singing tributes to Stephen Sondheim on YouTube, art gallery exhibitions have gone virtual and professional athletes are playing video games on ESPN.

But all these well-intentioned efforts have

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Why our laws can’t protect me from my digital stalker

The author of this article shares her experience as a victim of digital and physical harassment. She will remain anonymous for safety reasons.

Stalking became a hot topic when Netflix released the hit series You. Unfortunately, many people were familiar with the plot all too well before its release. I’ve watched the show and, as someone who is currently being stalked, I could recognize an awful lot in the first season.

While technology has made so many wonderful things possible, I’ve sadly discovered it has also made us all more vulnerable. Stalking and harassing someone has become much easier since the internet and the use of mobile phones became a standard as it can be done more easily, it’s anonymous, and there are hardly any boundaries to it.

[Read: Sexual predators on Twitch: We all knew]

What makes this especially sad is that I’ve always been a geek, a

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