Race

America’s national parks face existential crisis over race

As millions of Americans escape home quarantine to the great outdoors this summer, they’ll venture into parks, campgrounds and forest lands that remain stubborn bastions of self-segregation.

“The outdoors and public lands suffer from the same systemic racism that the rest of our society does,” said Joel Pannell, associate director of the Sierra Club, which is leading an effort to boost diversity in the wilderness and access to natural spaces.

New government data, shared first with ABC News, shows the country’s premier outdoor spaces — the 419 national parks — remain overwhelmingly white. Just 23% of visitors to the parks were people of color, the National Park Service found in its most recent 10-year survey; 77% were white. Minorities make up 42% of the U.S. population.

“That tells me that we’ve got a lot of work to do,” said David Vela, acting director of the National Park Service.

The career

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Ivirlei Brookes on What It Means to Be an Ally and How to Talk to Your Kids About Race

“I don’t think people realize that it was really hard to film,” Ivirlei Brookes revealed to WrapWomen. The actress turned business and mindset coach recently went viral after posting this emotional yet informative video on how the non-Black community can become better allies.

“I was feeling extremely low and exhausted from all the arguing I was seeing online,” said Brookes. “I decided to make a video for Black people to use as a tool – they could send the video link to their white friends when they didn’t have enough energy left to explain.”

Brookes recorded the video on Instagram live with 11 viewers tuned in. Afterwards, she uploaded it to IGTV and within one week the video had over 5.8 million views. It even caught the attention of white celebrities including Hailey Bieber, Lili Reinhart, Ellen Pompeo, Ariel Winter, Nolan Gould among others who reposted the call to action.

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‘Dungeons & Dragons’ Race Issues Have Deep Roots In The World Of Fantasy

Wizards of the Coast — the company behind the self-proclaimed “world’s greatest role-playing game,” “Dungeons & Dragons” — has committed to stressing diversity and removing racially problematic language from its product line, and fans are holding the company to account for its promises.

“Dungeons & Dragons,” commonly known as D&D, is a game in which a group of players creates characters, rolls dice and navigates a story overseen by a Dungeon Master. Originally created in 1974, the game issued a fifth edition in 2014 that became its most popular, especially after livestreaming platforms such as Twitch and shows such as Netflix’s “Stranger Things” introduced D&D to new audiences.

The game’s newfound popularity, however, has also invited critiques. Critics have pointed out that when creating a character, D&D players must choose a “race” — such as an elf, dwarf or gnome — and that this usage of the word is technically

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