School

More Twin Cities School Districts Make Decisions For Fall: LIST

MINNEAPOLIS-ST. PAUL METRO, MN — It’s been more than a week since Gov. Tim Walz and the Minnesota Department of Health released parameters they want schools to meet before fully reopening, and more schools have made decisions about what this fall will look like for students and staff.

Minnesota’s “back to school” season is going to be unlike any other year, due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

The recommended model of education — distance learning, hybrid, or in-person — depends on how many coronavirus cases are reported in the county.

However, the ultimate decision of how to reopen school this fall is being left up to the school districts themselves.

Several school districts in the Twin Cities metro have already announced their “education model” decision for this fall, while others are planning to do so later this month:

Note: All school districts in Minnesota are required to offer an online-only

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15 top-rated school supplies under $15

15 top-rated school supplies under $15
15 top-rated school supplies under $15

— Recommendations are independently chosen by Reviewed’s editors. Purchases you make through our links may earn us a commission.                

Binders, backpacks, folders, pencils, notebooks—school-supply shopping can be fun and exciting but the costs can also add up fast. Whether your child is heading back into the classroom in the fall or continuing remote learning, there are a lot of essentials they’ll need (see above list for starters). To help you save money on this year’s back-to-school haul, we’ve rounded up 15 of the best school supplies you can buy right now for less than $15, from colorful InkJoy gel pens to the best-selling notebooks on Amazon—including a few personal favorites I remember using from my own school days.

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1. These popular mechanical pencils

One-click writing at your fingertips.
One-click writing
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School reopening debate shows power of local school boards

Donald Trump and Betsy Devos may want to dictate how — and if — schools reopen this fall, but in most states and cities those decisions will be made by a different group of elected officials, the more than 90,000 school board members nationwide.

Across the country, school board members, joined with district superintendents, are exploring online education options, considering mask mandates, and determining what a socially distanced classroom looks like. Lying beneath all these decisions is the outcome they’ll have on student learning.

This decision process shines a light on the power local school boards have. In an age of No Child Left Behind, Race to the Top, and other federal and state education policy programs, it’s easy to write off school boards as bygones of an antiquated era with little power or say in how schools actually run. But it’s these local leaders who make countless decisions —

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Former education secretary discusses safely returning to school

Former Education Secretary John King has some recommendations on how schools can reopen safely in the coming weeks, amid the coronavirus pandemic.  

He says that effective contact tracing and national, large-scale testing access are only the first steps that need to be taken to return kids to school. For King, who served in the Obama administration as both education secretary and deputy secretary, redesigning schools to enforce social distancing recommendations is a far more complex issue.

“The best advice we have is that students need to be physically distant, which means we need to bring class size down so that students are at least six feet apart,” King told CBS News’ chief Washington correspondent Major Garrett on this week’s episode of “The Takeout” podcast. “We’ve got to make sure that students are wearing masks, [and] that teachers are wearing masks,” he added, declaring that installing plexiglass barriers around desks is

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Georgia class quarantined after first day of school as images of crowded school circulate online

Twitter via Associated Press
Twitter via Associated Press

Images of students standing shoulder to shoulder and without masks have sparked renewed coronavirus fears as a classroom is placed in quarantine after the first day of school.

Pictures and video showing dozens of students walking the halls and posing for first-day-of-school photos appeared online soon after in-person classes began on Monday in Georgia.

Paulding County superintendent Brian Ottot confirmed in an email that photos from hallways at North Paulding High School in Dallas were authentic, according to the Associated Press.

“There is no question that the photo does not look good,” Mr Ottot said in the email.

It comes as a classroom at Sixes Elementary School in Georgia’s Cherokee County was shut down after a second-grade student tested positive for Covid-19 on the first day.

The student’s teacher and 20 classmates would quarantine with online classes for the next two weeks, school district spokesperson Barbara

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‘I don’t know what I’m supposed to do.’ Parents in distress over school opening online

First grade student Isabella Tahmasian writes her name with fellow classmates on the first day of school for LAUSD in 2017. The Los Angeles Unified School District and United Teachers Los Angeles agreed upon a deal for online learning just before the first day of school on Aug. 18. <span class="copyright">(Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)</span>
First grade student Isabella Tahmasian writes her name with fellow classmates on the first day of school for LAUSD in 2017. The Los Angeles Unified School District and United Teachers Los Angeles agreed upon a deal for online learning just before the first day of school on Aug. 18. (Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

How do we start school online? I have five children and one Wi-Fi hot spot. I can’t answer the questions my children are asking. The kids have way too much free time. What took so long to come up with this schedule? We need help.

As a more detailed picture of the new online-only school day in Los Angeles emerges, a crescendo of concerns and questions is arising among parents, whose children will be expected to fire up computers in less than two weeks for the opening of the 2020-21 school year amid a global

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The Maryland county where Barron Trump attends school ordered private schools to stay closed until October, but the governor overrode the decision

President Donald Trump, first lady Melania Trump and their son Barron Trump walk across the South Lawn before leaving the White House on board Marine One November 26, 2019 in Washington, DC.
President Donald Trump, first lady Melania Trump and their son Barron Trump walk across the South Lawn before leaving the White House on board Marine One November 26, 2019 in Washington, DC.

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

  • Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan on Monday issued an emergency order to block the county where Barron Trump goes to school from banning private schools from opening for in-person instruction.

  • On Friday, the Montgomery County, Maryland, health officer issued a mandate that ordered private schools remain closed for in-person learning until at least October 1.

  • President Trump’s son, Barron, attends the St. Andrew’s Episcopal School in the Maryland county.

  • “The blanket closure mandate imposed by Montgomery County was “overly broad and inconsistent with the powers intended to be delegated to the county health officer,” Hogan said in a statement Monday.

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan on Monday blocked a county’s

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More pro athletes opt out, Indiana student tests positive on first day of school, Birx warns rural US

Congressional leaders and White House officials bickered over details of a proposed $1 trillion stimulus package Sunday, with checks to individuals, jobless benefits and relief for small businesses hanging in the balance.

All sides agree that progress was made in talks Saturday, but on Sunday no one spoke optimistically about a deal coming soon. Among the major sticking points: what will replace a $600 weekly unemployment benefit supplement that expired last week. That bonus more than doubled unemployment checks for tens of millions of Americans left jobless by months of the pandemic-driven recession.

“We have to balance,” Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said Sunday on ABC’s “This Week.” “There’s obviously a need to support workers, support the economy. … On the other hand, we have to be careful about not piling on enormous amounts of debt.”

Meanwhile, more pro athletes say they won’t play this season, and another music festival has

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More pro athletes opt out of season, Indiana student tests positive on first day of school, Birx warns rural US

Congressional leaders and White House officials bickered over details of a proposed $1 trillion stimulus package Sunday, with checks to individuals, jobless benefits and relief for small businesses hanging in the balance.

All sides agree that progress was made in talks Saturday, but on Sunday no one spoke optimistically about a deal coming soon. Among the major sticking points: what will replace a $600 weekly unemployment benefit supplement that expired last week. That bonus more than doubled unemployment checks for tens of millions of Americans left jobless by months of the pandemic-driven recession.

“We have to balance,” Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said Sunday on ABC’s “This Week.” “There’s obviously a need to support workers, support the economy. … On the other hand, we have to be careful about not piling on enormous amounts of debt.”

Meanwhile, more pro athletes say they won’t play this season, and another music festival has

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Online school? Some parents want to hire tutors, start mini schools this year. Most can’t afford to.

CHICAGO – Millions of parents across the nation are facing difficult decisions about what to do with their kids this school year. But the pandemic affects every family differently, for reasons that range from their socioeconomic status to their health to the fields they work in.

Some parents are in a better position than others to ensure their children stay healthy and keep up with schoolwork, and researchers are raising questions about how the pandemic may continue to exacerbate existing educational inequalities.

“Kids who are disproportionately low-income are at highest risk for learning losses,” said Ariel Kalil, a professor at the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy. “When these gaps in learning open up, absent some really serious and sustained intervention, the kids won’t (catch up). That will result in less academic achievement, lower lifetime earnings and even lower productivity in adulthood.”

USA TODAY spoke with more than

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