schools

What Teachers Want Parents To Know As Schools Reopen

The coronavirus pandemic is raging, but schools are beginning to reopen across the country — many with terrifying results. 

HuffPost Parenting asked the teachers from our Facebook community what they want parents to know right now. Here’s what they had to say.

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“Educators will all tell you that we want to see our kids! We want group work, laughter in our hallways, pizza party incentives and everything that we once had in our schools. We also want to live, and we want our children to live

With the disruption of 2019-20’s school year, alongside immense loss-grief-trauma, our children will need time to make up any deficits they’ve encountered. This is doubly true for students of color and students with disabilities. … The plans that have been laid out thus far are vague and put us all at risk. It would be great to have had actual teachers

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Students among first to return offer lessons for reopening schools

NASHVILLE — Abigail Alexander shuffled through a stack of papers trying to find instructions for logging in to her school-issued laptop. 

The 10-year-old chatted with her best friend, a fellow fifth grader, about who is in their classes this year at Head Middle Magnet Prep in Nashville and what period they have a specific teacher.

Their conversation Tuesday sounded like a typical one between excited, anxious students on the first day at a new school — except this year’s first day of school was like no other.

Abigail was seated in the dining room of her North Nashville home while her two younger foster siblings played around the table. Her friend was on FaceTime, the phone propped up against the side of Abigail’s laptop.

The girls were among more than 86,000 Nashville students who started the school year virtually while their schools remained closed due the ongoing spread of the

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Biden won’t go to Milwaukee for convention; Chicago schools to start online; Florida surpasses 500,000 cases

Another pharmaceutical giant announced a vaccine deal with the U.S. on Wednesday while Joe Biden and the rest of the Democratic celebs bid adieu to Milwaukee’s political convention before the coronation train ever rolled into town.

Johnson & Johnson said it has a $1 billion agreement to supply 100 million doses of its vaccine candidate to the U.S. government. Also Wednesday, Moderna said it expects to fully enroll 30,000 people for a trial of its vaccine candidate next month. And a day earlier, Novavax released promising results of an early trial. 

Milwaukee’s 2020 Democratic National Convention suffers the same fate as Charlotte, where plans for a full-blown GOP convention have been whittled down to a few small gatherings later this month.

While the nation waits for a vaccine that could fully reopen schools and businesses, the University of Connecticut became the first top-level college program to cancel its football season.

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Johnson & Johnson, US cut vaccine deal; Chicago schools to start online; Florida surpasses 500,000 cases

Another pharmaceutical giant announced a vaccine deal with the U.S. on Wednesday, and a second round of coronavirus stimulus checks could soon be in the mail.

Johnson & Johnson said it has a $1 billion agreement to supply 100 million doses of its vaccine candidate to the U.S. government. Also Wednesday, Moderna said it expects to fully enroll 30,000 people for a trial of its vaccine candidate next month. And a day earlier, Novavax released promising results of an early trial. 

While the nation waits for a vaccine that could fully reopen schools and businesses, Democrats and negotiators from the White House say another stimulus deal could be reached by the end of the week. That could be good news for tens of millions of unemployed Americans whose $600 weekly boost in unemployment benefits has expired.

Here are some significant developments:

📈 Today’s numbers: The U.S. has recorded more than

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Schools seeking alternative to remote learning move classes outside

DETROIT — With just days to go before the start of the new academic year, schools around the country are rushing to gather materials they never thought they would need: plexiglass dividers, piles of masks and internet hot spots to connect with students remotely.

And then there are schools that have an even more unusual list.

The Detroit Waldorf School in Michigan is buying carriage bolts, berry bushes and 8,000 square feet of cedar wood.

The San Francisco Unified School District has been busy gathering tree stumps.

And the Five Town Community School District in Maine is buying tents, yurts and enough all-weather snowsuits for each of its elementary school students.

These schools and districts are all laying the groundwork to move at least some instruction to outdoor classrooms. They’re making a bet that the lower risk of disease transmission in the open air, and the extra space outside for

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The MLB Couldn’t Keep COVID-19 At Bay, But We Still Think Schools Stand A Chance?

As a huge baseball family, there’s been a hole in our lives since spring. Every March and April we all anxiously anticipate watching those first few pitches. As we see our favorite players run out onto the field on the big screen in our living room, my husband and I crack a beer, put out some snacks for us and the kids, and make it official. It’s baseball season.

But this year COVID-19 took professional sports away, like it took everything else away, and we’ve spent the last few months watching Netflix and Friends reruns and movies we love instead.

Until recently, when MLB announced they’re going to try and make it work, somehow, in 2020. But, as many expected, COVID-19 began to spread throughout the clubhouses, throughout the teams, infecting player after player. And now it’s looking grim and likely that this modified, shortened season will, for some teams,

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The Maryland county where Barron Trump attends school ordered private schools to stay closed until October, but the governor overrode the decision

President Donald Trump, first lady Melania Trump and their son Barron Trump walk across the South Lawn before leaving the White House on board Marine One November 26, 2019 in Washington, DC.
President Donald Trump, first lady Melania Trump and their son Barron Trump walk across the South Lawn before leaving the White House on board Marine One November 26, 2019 in Washington, DC.

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

  • Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan on Monday issued an emergency order to block the county where Barron Trump goes to school from banning private schools from opening for in-person instruction.

  • On Friday, the Montgomery County, Maryland, health officer issued a mandate that ordered private schools remain closed for in-person learning until at least October 1.

  • President Trump’s son, Barron, attends the St. Andrew’s Episcopal School in the Maryland county.

  • “The blanket closure mandate imposed by Montgomery County was “overly broad and inconsistent with the powers intended to be delegated to the county health officer,” Hogan said in a statement Monday.

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan on Monday blocked a county’s

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Some parents want to hire tutors, start mini schools this year. Most can’t afford to.

CHICAGO – Millions of parents across the nation are facing difficult decisions about what to do with their kids this school year. But the pandemic affects every family differently, for reasons that range from their socioeconomic status to their health to the fields they work in.

Some parents are in a better position than others to ensure their children stay healthy and keep up with schoolwork, and researchers are raising questions about how the pandemic may exacerbate existing educational inequalities.

“Kids who are disproportionately low-income are at highest risk for learning losses,” said Ariel Kalil, a professor at the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy. “When these gaps in learning open up, absent some really serious and sustained intervention, the kids won’t (catch up). That will result in less academic achievement, lower lifetime earnings and even lower productivity in adulthood.”

USA TODAY spoke with more than a dozen

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Online school? Some parents want to hire tutors, start mini schools this year. Most can’t afford to.

CHICAGO – Millions of parents across the nation are facing difficult decisions about what to do with their kids this school year. But the pandemic affects every family differently, for reasons that range from their socioeconomic status to their health to the fields they work in.

Some parents are in a better position than others to ensure their children stay healthy and keep up with schoolwork, and researchers are raising questions about how the pandemic may continue to exacerbate existing educational inequalities.

“Kids who are disproportionately low-income are at highest risk for learning losses,” said Ariel Kalil, a professor at the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy. “When these gaps in learning open up, absent some really serious and sustained intervention, the kids won’t (catch up). That will result in less academic achievement, lower lifetime earnings and even lower productivity in adulthood.”

USA TODAY spoke with more than

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As Maryland public schools go online this fall, private and parochial schools ready to welcome students on campus

As Maryland’s public schools announced their decisions to keep their doors closed at least for the beginning of the school year, private schools have done just the reverse — arguing they have the ability to give families the in-person classes they want while keeping students safe.

Because of their small size, some experts say private and Catholic schools, are better able to make quick adjustments to their curriculum and often have more physical space to spread students out. But financial forces and teachers unions are also shaping public and private school decisions.

“The driver has been meeting the needs of our students,” said Donna Hargens, the superintendent of Catholic Schools in the Baltimore Archdiocese. “The interpersonal interaction is essential to the learning process and we know that some of our students struggled with remote learning especially those with learning needs.”

Public schools, meanwhile, often have to cope with tightly-packed classrooms

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