Sports

EA Sports’ MMA fighter captures the blood and thunder of its inspiration

UFC 4
UFC 4

Freed somewhat from the seasonal release schedule that EA Sports follows with its mega-successful FIFA and Madden NFL series, the sporting game giant steps into the octagon once every two years with its digital interpretation of the hyper-violent Ultimate Fighting Championship.

 A good thing too, as the ebb and flow of mixed martial arts follows a different pattern to those more mainstream sports, as its trends and competitors morph and innovate. EA has always had a fine way with crunchy pugilism, its Fight Night boxing series is much missed, but succeeded by the excellent multi-limbed combat of UFC.

Such is the variety between its competitors – wrestlers, kickboxers and Brazilian jiu jitsu experts throttling for position – that pulling them altogether into cogent dust-ups is no mean feat. This is where UFC 4 excels most, with a terrific fighting system that allows for different tactics and expression.

By

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Steph Curry and 25 Athletes With Major Business Empires Outside of Sports

Being a professional athlete can easily make you a millionaire, but these sports stars have expanded their wealth by turning those team paychecks into veritable empires. See how these players have been making bank outside of the sports world.

Last updated: Aug. 7, 2020

1. Shaquille O’Neal

Former NBA pro Shaquille O’Neal has invested his money in companies he believes in — and it’s ended up paying off for him. O’Neal formerly owned 10% of Five Guys’ entire franchise portfolio and eventually sold it, telling CNBC that the burger business was “very good” to him. He was also an early investor in Google and invested in Ring before it was acquired by Amazon for $1 billion.

2. Earvin ‘Magic’ Johnson

  • Magic Johnson Enterprises

NBA great Earvin “Magic” Johnson is the chairman and chief executive officer of Magic Johnson Enterprises, an investment conglomerate valued at an estimated $1 billion, according to

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Sacramento fall sports shutdowns hit parents, coaches

As the debate on whether to open California schools during the coronavirus pandemic continues, many Sacramento area fall sports have been postponed or canceled, affecting children and families.

The cancellations have caused uncertainty for many households, especially those with young children. If parents have to work and are unable to get a caretaker for their kids or put them in an activity, it can cause stress.

Richard Graham is the 14U coach for the Roseville Junior Tigers, a travel football team.

In addition to coaching, he has three sons of his own. His 14-year-old plays football, while his 7- and 8-year-olds play soccer. He also sponsors and coaches four other children who do not have father figures.

Graham notes that in wealthier areas, parents are more likely to be in the picture and can afford to do more with their kids. “Not everyone has that,” he said.

“It’s not just

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Fall sports shutdowns hit parents, coaches

As the debate on whether to open California schools during the coronavirus pandemic continues, many Sacramento area fall sports have been postponed or canceled, affecting children and families.

The cancellations have caused uncertainty for many households, especially those with young children. If parents have to work and are unable to get a caretaker for their kids or put them in an activity, it can cause stress.

Richard Graham is the 14U coach for the Roseville Junior Tigers, a travel football team.

In addition to coaching, he has three sons of his own. His 14-year-old plays football, while his 7- and 8-year-olds play soccer. He also sponsors and coaches four other children who do not have father figures.

Graham notes that in wealthier areas, parents are more likely to be in the picture and can afford to do more with their kids. “Not everyone has that,” he said.

“It’s not just

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NASCAR banks on minority drivers to broaden sport’s exposure

Rajah Caruth liked the animated autos of “Cars” as a kid, got hooked on the race scene after a trip to the track and sharpened his driving skills as a teen via online racing.

Caruth might one day earn his shot at inspiring the next generation of drivers.

The 18-year-old Caruth is a NASCAR prospect, a young Black driver and one of a half-dozen youngsters participating in the Drive for Diversity program tasked with finding and developing drivers for a sport lean on women and minorities behind the wheel.

“Ideally, I’d want to be in the Cup Series in the next decade,” Caruth said. “Hopefully, by then.”

The program has developed few drivers for the elite Cup Series over nearly two decades in existence — Bubba Wallace and Daniel Suarez are among the former members and the only ones currently with rides — but a renewed push at scouting younger

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25 Things To Know About Gambling On Sports

Until recently, you had to go to Las Vegas to place a legal wager on a sporting event. That’s all changed, however, and sports betting today is gobbling up a bigger and bigger piece of the gambling pie everywhere it’s allowed. Sports gambling is big business, and the odds are stacked against the party that places the bet. Like all gambling, sports betting is a potentially dangerous and destructive vice, so bet responsibly, stick to your limits and get acquainted with the process with this primer — and if you’re still not ready for the risks, stick to safer investments.

Last updated: July 25, 2020

Sports Gambling Has Been Deregulated

On May 14, 2018, the Supreme Court overturned the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act of 1992 (PASPA), which outlawed sports betting in the United States outside of Nevada. Within just one year, seven states in addition to Nevada legalized

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College sports betting should be banned

Pittsburgh athletic director Heather Lyke argued in a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Wednesday that gambling on college sports should be prohibited.

Lyke testified as part of a hearing titled “Protecting the Integrity of College Athletics.” The hearing was scheduled as college athletic administrators are pushing for federal legislation to govern rules allowing players to make money off their name, image and likeness.

Lyke argued in her prepared testimony that legal gambling on college sports “will have a corrosive and detrimental impact on student-athletes and the general student body alike. Gambling creates pressures and temptations that should not exist.”

Since a federal law banning sports wagering across the country was repealed in 2018 and left for states to legalize sports betting, betting on sports is legal in 18 states. Multiple states have rules against betting on schools located in them and Lyke cited those restrictions as a reason why gambling

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Football plays its part as fantasy sports business booms in India

The fantasy sports industry has seen rapid growth in India over the last few years.

Major players in the industry have overcome the legal issue of fantasy gaming in India. When the functioning of Dream 11 was challenged legally, Rajasthan, Punjab & Haryana and Bombay High Courts ruled that playing such games involved considerable skill and thus, exempted them from the provisions of the Public Gambling Act, 1867. 

India’s betting laws haven’t realy evolved and there haven’t been any regulations or guidelines when the internet era kicked off and brought along with it quite a few online games of skill that offered financial rewards to users. As a result, in 2017, the Federation of Indian Fantasy Sports (FIFS) was formed. The FIFS is India’s first and only fantasy Sports self-regulatory body which was established to protect consumer interest.

Fantasy sports, the money-spinner?

The FIFS published the contents of a KPMG

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Ivy League First in Division I to Scrap Sports Competition

(Bloomberg) — The Ivy League canceled sports competition for the upcoming semester because of health and safety concerns about the coronavirus pandemic, becoming the first Division I conference in the U.S. to scrap football.

The conference, whose eight members include Harvard University, Yale University and Princeton University, made the move Wednesday, according to a statement.

“No decision has been made about competition in the winter or spring terms, including whether or not we can move fall sports into the spring,” the league’s executive director, Robin Harris, said in an interview. “There won’t be basketball games or hockey games or other sports in the fall.”

U.S. colleges are presenting their plans for the semester that begins in August or September, instituting steps for the safe return of students. They’re also deciding whether it’s too risky to resume the high-contact sport of football, which can bring in sizable revenue for a school

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Game over for sports betting on coronavirus insurance

* Wimbledon won’t get COVID-19 cancellation cover in 2021

* World Athletics not aware of available COVID-19 insurance

* Australian Open says 2021 pandemic cover not viable

* Some U.S. golfing tournaments have 2020 cover

By Carolyn Cohn and Noor Zainab Hussain

LONDON, July 1 (Reuters) – Major sports events working to get back up and running after the coronavirus crisis are likely to have to do so without cancellation insurance for communicable diseases as insurers remove cover or ramp up the cost.

Although the Wimbledon tennis championships will be covered by an existing pandemic policy after this week’s event was cancelled due to the coronavirus outbreak, its organisers say it will not be able to get similar cover next year.

“All the policies that we are seeing at this time have a complete exclusion for communicable disease,” Warren Harper, Sports & Events Industry Practice Leader in insurance broker Marsh’s

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