students

Colleges hope new rules will slow COVID-19 spread, students aren’t convinced

Colleges want their students back this fall. That much is clear.

What’s less clear are the new rules for student conduct in the midst of a pandemic, and how universities will go about enforcing them, especially when the offensive behavior takes place off-campus – or overnight.

The University of Texas at Austin, for example, has banned parties, both on campus and off, saying they put “the health and safety of our community at risk and raise anxiety levels.”

Tulane University in New Orleans threatened suspension or expulsion for students who throw or attend parties that have more than 15 people and asked students to monitor and report on the behavior of their peers.

“Do you really want to be the reason that Tulane and New Orleans have to shut down again?” the message to students concluded. 

University of Pennsylvania officials have asked that students refrain from organizing parties while prohibiting

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Students among first to return offer lessons for reopening schools

NASHVILLE — Abigail Alexander shuffled through a stack of papers trying to find instructions for logging in to her school-issued laptop. 

The 10-year-old chatted with her best friend, a fellow fifth grader, about who is in their classes this year at Head Middle Magnet Prep in Nashville and what period they have a specific teacher.

Their conversation Tuesday sounded like a typical one between excited, anxious students on the first day at a new school — except this year’s first day of school was like no other.

Abigail was seated in the dining room of her North Nashville home while her two younger foster siblings played around the table. Her friend was on FaceTime, the phone propped up against the side of Abigail’s laptop.

The girls were among more than 86,000 Nashville students who started the school year virtually while their schools remained closed due the ongoing spread of the

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University of Maryland students struggle to cancel housing leases

When South Campus Commons at the University of Maryland, College Park, canceled its apartment leases in March, Julia Kane called it “the right thing to do” during the pandemic.

By June, the university also gave students the option to cancel their fall housing agreements without penalty. But then South Campus Commons and The Courtyards, the public-private apartments owned by the Maryland Economic Development Corporation, told students they were legally bound to their leases.

Capstone On-Campus Management, the entity hired to manage the apartments, told 3,000 students with leases their only options were to re-lease to another student, to pay and live on-campus, or to pay and live at home, Kane said. Kane, a senior studying marketing and operations management and business analytics, managed to cancel her lease cost-free, but it only happened after days of pressure from her father, who is an attorney.

“When I signed this lease back in

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NYU Stern Students Protest MBA Tuition Hike During COVID

MBA students at NYU Stern are protesting a 3.5% hike in tuition during the pandemic and asking for discounts of 5% to 10% due to the shift toward remote instruction. Stern photo

MBA students at New York University’s Stern School of Business are urging the school to reverse a decision to increase their annual tuition by 3.5% and instead grant a 5% to 10% discount as classes move online during the pandemic. The petition requesting a freeze of Stern’s $76,780 annual tuition, up from $74,184 a year earlier, has been signed by more than 300 students.

“Raising tuition during this time period feels wrong,” according to the statement signed “The NYU Stern MBA Class of 2021.” The letter was posted to Twitter by Stern second-year MBA Avik Banerjee who is doing his summer internship with Bain & Co. and reports that more than 300 students have signed the petition. “It

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As Maryland public schools go online this fall, private and parochial schools ready to welcome students on campus

As Maryland’s public schools announced their decisions to keep their doors closed at least for the beginning of the school year, private schools have done just the reverse — arguing they have the ability to give families the in-person classes they want while keeping students safe.

Because of their small size, some experts say private and Catholic schools, are better able to make quick adjustments to their curriculum and often have more physical space to spread students out. But financial forces and teachers unions are also shaping public and private school decisions.

“The driver has been meeting the needs of our students,” said Donna Hargens, the superintendent of Catholic Schools in the Baltimore Archdiocese. “The interpersonal interaction is essential to the learning process and we know that some of our students struggled with remote learning especially those with learning needs.”

Public schools, meanwhile, often have to cope with tightly-packed classrooms

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A Small Georgia City Plans to Put Students in Classrooms This Week

Jefferson High seniors Hope Terhune and Rylee Meadows, who started a petition drive calling for a mandatory mask rule, in Jefferson, Ga., an hour's drive north of Atlanta, July 24, 2020. (Melissa Golden/The New York Times)
Jefferson High seniors Hope Terhune and Rylee Meadows, who started a petition drive calling for a mandatory mask rule, in Jefferson, Ga., an hour’s drive north of Atlanta, July 24, 2020. (Melissa Golden/The New York Times)

JEFFERSON, Ga. — When Jennifer Fogle and her family moved from Indiana to Georgia 13 years ago, they settled in Jefferson, a small, handsome city an hour’s drive from Atlanta, because they had heard about the excellent schools. And until recently, they had little to complain about. The teachers are passionate and committed, and the facilities rival those found at some private schools.

But in recent days Fogle found herself uncharacteristically anxious, after learning that Jefferson City Schools planned to offer face-to-face instruction in the midst of a resurgent coronavirus pandemic that has seen thousands of new cases reported daily in Georgia.

As other districts around the state delayed their back-to-school days or moved

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U.S. Students Need Help Getting Online

(Bloomberg Opinion) — With a new school year approaching, the U.S. faces an educational crisis. Though the Trump administration wants a full reopening of K-12 schools, not all states and school districts are going along. Millions of students will still attend classes remotely, at least part of the time, and many may stay home until coronavirus vaccines are widely available.

Such a prolonged absence from the classroom will harm students of all ages and abilities. For those who lack reliable access to computers and high-speed internet at home — as many as one-third of all public-school students — the shift to online learning threatens to create deficits they’ll never recover from.

It’s critical that Congress provide funding in the next coronavirus relief bill to assist families that can’t afford internet access. But that will take time that students can’t afford. The government needs to do more to get them online

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‘Virtual kidnappings’ warning for Chinese students in Australia

Sydney (AFP) – Elaborate “virtual kidnappings” are being used to extort money from the friends and relatives of Chinese students Down Under, Australian police warned Monday, after a spate of transnational scams were reported.

Police said that conmen claiming to be Chinese authorities had netted millions of US dollars in ransoms by scaring students into faking their own kidnappings.

The scammers — often calling in Mandarin and claiming to be from the Chinese embassy, police or consulate — initially say the victim is accused of a crime in China or tell them their identity has been stolen before threatening them with deportation or arrest unless a fee is paid, police said.

The fraudsters then continue to threaten the victim, often over encrypted message services, until they transfer large sums into offshore bank accounts.

In some cases, victims were told to cease contact with friends and relatives, then make videos of

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‘Clear as mud’ housing refund plans irk college students

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — When Laura Comino opened the housing email from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro in June, she knew she had to take action.

At the direction of the state’s public university system, UNCG asked her to sign a housing contract addendum acknowledging that she might not get a refund if the school kicks her out of her dorm in the fall because of the coronavirus pandemic.

An online petition Comino circulated days later collected nearly 40,000 signatures from people demanding that all 16 UNC System colleges offer prorated refunds and return deposits if the virus closes dorms.

“People got so incredibly upset thinking this would affect all of us, and there’s a possibility where it still might,” Comino said.

With classes scheduled to begin in August, the possibility of no refunds has left students and administrators alike with questions. Comino and the dean of her

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Case of teen jailed for missing online classwork shows how schools and courts oppress Black students

While school districts all over the country grapple with how to best educate youth this upcoming academic year during a global pandemic, one Michigan teen sits in a juvenile detention center with no prospect of returning to in-person or remote learning anytime soon. The 15-year-old, identified only as Grace, has been in jail since May because she violated the terms of her probation by not completing her online coursework, according to a new report co-authored by ProPublica Illinois and the Detroit Free Press.

Grace, who is Black and has diagnosed ADHD, was on probation for fighting with her mom and stealing a cellphone from a classmate. After her school transitioned to remote learning on April 15, Grace said she felt unmotivated and overwhelmed by the work for her school, located in the predominantly white community of Beverly Hills, Mich.

That’s true of many students displaced from their schools, but, calling

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