students

How the coronavirus has changed education for some of Dallas’ most vulnerable students

It’s after midnight when Gabriella Munoz, 18, comes home, legs weary from waiting tables for eight hours. She sits down at her computer and mulls the economics chapters to read and math problems to finish before returning to another day at North Garland High.

This is Munoz’s new routine since the COVID-19 pandemic interrupted her life and left her older sister, who made nearly half of the family’s income, out of a job.

After struggling to keep up with remote learning this spring she was excited to engage with her teachers in a classroom during the first eight weeks of the fall semester. But Munoz, who lives in Rowlett, quickly found her new and unpredictable work hours made it hard to stick to the school schedule.

Based on her experience last year, she’s worried.

“School was very rough for me and I barely passed because I didn’t feel like there

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Opinion | Prince George’s plan to build schools will help students and the community

For example, all schools must be delivered no later than July 15, 2024, or the developer will be subject to liquidated damages for each day that they are delayed; a design-build reserve account will be in place for the developer to access should there be cost overruns or unforeseen charges. This is not additional money; it has been built into their availability payment.

Additionally, Prince George’s County Public Schools doesn’t make a single payment until 50 percent of the total design-build costs have been spent by the developer. That incentivizes the developer to proceed deliberately and expeditiously to deliver the schools on time. These are just a few of the safeguards under the contract to ensure the project proceeds on schedule; however, the school system’s procurement process and the underlying intent of the public-private partnership is and has been available for public review online since last year.

This agreement also

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Pandemic-weary Santa Fe teachers adapting for returning students | Coronavirus

There was no college course that could have prepared Emily Merritt, rookie kindergarten teacher, for this situation.

Just how do you get through to a student who’s come to his online class in pajamas?

Merritt, who teaches at Amy Biehl Community School, knew at that moment this was not going to be a normal year for anyone — much less a first-year educator just a few months removed from college.

“You ask them, ‘Oh, are you sick?’ ” Merritt said. “ ‘No, I just don’t feel like getting out of bed.’ You’re like, where is that line? Do I tell them, ‘No, you have to get out of bed,’ or do I respect that they’re at their own home and I have to give them their space?

“That’s something I would have never considered before this.”

Such conundrums never cease in a COVID-19 teaching world that straddles a blurry line

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How have students fared in the coronavirus pandemic? New data sheds some light.

Complicating matters is that this shift poses challenges in accurately assessing student progress and participation. But as more data emerges, one thing continues to be clear, experts say — the pandemic is amplifying inequities between students.

Opportunity Insights, a data project from Harvard and Brown universities, has been tracking the economic impact of the pandemic on consumer spending, small business revenue, employment and education at tracktherecovery.org.

On the education front, it has partnered with Zearn, a math curriculum publisher that provides digital lessons and instruction to school districts and teachers. Using data from Zearn, Opportunity Insights has measured the progress and participation in online math coursework of some 800,000 students in kindergarten through fifth grade who were already using the platform

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UD sophomores create website that pairs students looking for work with Newarkers who need help with odd jobs | News

Need help with housework, an extra pair of hands during a move or some one-off development for your small business? University of Delaware sophomores Sean Gupta and Shahroze Ali have the answer — an online platform they created called Backyard Gig.

Gupta, a computer science major, explained that the idea for Backyard Gig came to him last fall. During his first semester at UD, he took an entrepreneurship class in which the professor encouraged students to keep a notebook handy and write down social problems they observed around them.

“Students needed a way to make money that fits in seamlessly with their school schedules,” Gupta said. “Residents – they’re always looking for someone to do work for them.”

He tossed the idea around in his head for a while before bringing on Ali, an earth sciences major and friend from high school, in January. The pair entered a number of

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UD students create website that pairs students looking for work with Newarkers who need help with odd jobs | News

Need help with housework, an extra pair of hands during a move or some one-off development for your small business? University of Delaware sophomores Sean Gupta and Shahroze Ali have the answer — an online platform they created called Backyard Gig.

Gupta, a computer science major, explained that the idea for Backyard Gig came to him last fall. During his first semester at UD, he took an entrepreneurship class in which the professor encouraged students to keep a notebook handy and write down social problems they observed around them.

“Students needed a way to make money that fits in seamlessly with their school schedules,” Gupta said. “Residents – they’re always looking for someone to do work for them.”

He tossed the idea around in his head for a while before bringing on Ali, an earth sciences major and friend from high school, in January. The pair entered a number of

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Some Wash. students can’t connect to virtual school

Not all students are got equal access as districts went virtual amid the coronavirus pandemic, and local districts are trying to combat the issue.

SPOKANE, Wash — As online schooling continues across the Inland Northwest, the harsh reality is that not all students are getting equal access.

Some kids, frequently referred to as the “lost children,” aren’t in a classroom and aren’t participating in online learning. As a result, they’re missing out on a number of connections.

This has left school districts around the Inland Northwest with the task of trying to keep track of these students that would normally be in their buildings everyday, while also trying to make sure they stay caught up on learning.

“It was pretty miserable those six months without the kid contact,” said Oakesdale School District Superintendent Jake Dingman.

“Our batteries are refilled by the interactions we have with our students. And right now,

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Many online students heading back to school, but models differ

But those online models will change in many cases as well. West Carrollton students who stay fully online will use the Schools PLP curriculum and will have a district mentor, but not live lessons with local teachers.

ExploreBellbrook, Troy, Beavercreek, others have school levies on ballot

Trotwood-Madison, which starts its hybrid in-person system Oct. 26, said for students who stay fully online, “the level of direct instruction and direct support will be abbreviated from what was provided during the first quarter.”

That’s because teachers also will be working with in-person students. The district said teachers will provide recorded lessons plus “minimal live sessions as time permits,” and online students would get a minimum of two check-in meetings per week.

Schools also vary in the number of days they’ll have students attend in-person classes. While Trotwood students will be in-person two days a week, Centerville and Huber Heights students will

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University warns about college students trying to contract COVID-19 to make money donating plasma with antibodies

Brigham Young University-Idaho warned on Monday about accounts of college students “intentionally” trying to contract COVID-19 in order to make money by donating plasma with antibodies. 

The Idaho university issued a statement saying officials were “deeply troubled” by the alleged behavior and “is actively seeking evidence of such conduct among our student body.”

Students who are determined to have intentionally exposed themselves or others to the virus will be immediately suspended from the university and may be permanently dismissed,” the university stated.

“The contraction and spread of COVID-19 is not a light matter,” the statement continued. “Reckless disregard for health and safety will inevitably lead to additional illness and loss of life in our community.”

University officials noted that they had previously cautioned last month that if Idaho or Madison County continue to experience surges in cases, the university may have to switch to fully online learning. 

The release

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Moms make COVID isolation gift bags for quarantined ASU students

“Water, Gatorade, just some fun snack foods… there’s a jump rope, a deck of cards,” said one of the moms.

ARIZONA, USA — A group of ASU moms are coming together this weekend to make 300 COVID isolation gift bags for Sun Devils quarantined on campus.  

It’s a collaboration of hundreds of ASU moms in a Facebook group online and others from out of state.  

“An army of ASU moms that are preparing care packages for ASU students that have tested positive and are in quarantine,” said Sue Rigler, who knows the struggle they’re going through. Her daughter contracted COVID-19.  

“She tested positive quite some time ago,” she said. “She’s very healthy now, but she was in quarantine for 10 days.”  

During that time, Sue sent her daughter a care package.  

“It didn’t have a smiley emoji stress ball in it, but it had mashed potatoes and bananas,” said Rigler.  

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