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To revive post-coronavirus economy, freelancer workers need our support

This year’s Labor Day celebrations will be far more subdued than normal.More than 50 million Americans have filed unemployment claims since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. And business bankruptcies are expected to rise nearly 50 percent this year. Thousands of firms — from national retail chains to mom-and-pop shops and local businesses — are struggling.

THIS LABOR DAY, WE CELEBRATE WOMEN’S WORKPLACE SUCCESS AND HONOR THE ‘ROSIES’ OF WORLD WAR IIThis unprecedented economic turmoil is pushing both businesses and workers towards a greater reliance on freelancing.

Americans are increasingly turning to these flexible jobs and choosing to become their own bosses, rather than search for a traditional 9 to 5 in a soft labor market. And one in every three companies plans to utilize more independent contractors to meet their changing needs, according to research firm Gartner.

As we honor the nation’s labor force, it’s impossible to ignore

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How your company can support employees’ physical and mental wellbeing

Did you know Alison Hadden, the author of this piece, is speaking at TNW2020 this year? Their session will explore how using tech can help us navigate our newfound death anxiety.

As a busy executive who seeks to keep my own personal health and wellness a top priority, especially since my cancer diagnosis last year, working for a company that supports these goals makes it so much easier to maintain this kind of lifestyle. And if you’re lucky enough to work in the wellness industry as I do for MINDBODY, well, you’ve hit the jackpot.

In today’s job market, top companies are in a tight race competing for top talent. During my six years at Glassdoor, I talked to hundreds of HR and Recruiting leaders about their challenges. What I learned is that smart employers recognize that in order to recruit the best candidates, they’ve got to create a workplace

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What the heck is happening with Apple, Google, and ‘Fortnite’?: Tech Support

Welcome to Tech Support, a segment where I, Dan Howley, serve as your intrepid guide through the sometimes confusing, often frustrating, world of personal technology.

Here, I answer all of your most pressing questions about the various gizmos, gadgets, and services you use in your everyday life.

Have a question of your own? Reach me on Twitter at @danielhowley or email me at dhowley@yahoofinance.com.

Now, on to your questions. This week’s dilemma:

“What the heck is going on between Apple, Google, and ‘Fortnite’?”

Chances are if you or your kids have tried to download or update Epic Games’ incredibly-popular “Fortnite” on your Apple (AAPL) or Android (GOOG, GOOGL) smartphone or tablet, you’ve hit a wall. 

If you’ve got the game already, you might be able to play it, but you can’t update it. And if you’re looking to download it for the first time, it’s just not there.

So what’s

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What the heck is happening with Apple, Google, and Fortnite?: Tech Support

Welcome to Tech Support, a segment where I, Dan Howley, serve as your intrepid guide through the sometimes confusing, often frustrating, world of personal technology.

Here, I answer all of your most pressing questions about the various gizmos, gadgets, and services you use in your everyday life.

@danielhowley or email me at dhowley@yahoofinance.com.” data-reactid=”22″Have a question of your own? Reach me on Twitter at @danielhowley or email me at dhowley@yahoofinance.com.

Now, on to your questions. This week’s dilemma:

Epic Games’ incredibly-popular “Fortnite” on your Apple (AAPL) or Android (GOOG, GOOGL) smartphone or tablet, you’ve hit a wall. ” data-reactid=”25″Chances are if you or your kids have tried to download or update Epic Games’ incredibly-popular “Fortnite” on your Apple (AAPL)

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‘Emotional support K-pop boys’ help fans with their mental health

‘Emotional support K-pop boys’ help fans with their mental health
‘Emotional support K-pop boys’ help fans with their mental health

“Every time I see him I feel like the sun is shining on my face.”

L. Gissele has three emotional support K-pop boys: Kim Namjoon aka RM from BTS, Bang Chan from Stray Kids, and Johnny Suh from NCT 127.

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“[Namjoon’s] words speak to me and he motivates me to always do better and to aim big. To always challenge myself,” the 18-year-old Panamanian told Mashable via DM. “[Chan] has been there for me at my lowest point in life. He makes me remember that depression does not define me and that I can get through everything.”

And Johnny? “Seeing him smile makes me happy.”

Feeling a strong attachment to or drawing strength from a specific idol isn’t unusual in K-pop fandom. Commonly called “emotional support K-pop boys,” these artists inspire and reassure people through their music, livestreams,

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As Film Festivals Go Online, a Competitive New Business Takes Shape to Support Them

As the pandemic forced shutdowns worldwide, no aspect of the film industry faced a more immediate existential threat than the festival circuit. While mainstays from Cannes to Telluride chose not to hold events at all, others did the once-unthinkable: They migrated online. Now, the race is on to provide digital services that support the unexpected era of the virtual film festival.

Enter Shift72, which counts Toronto, New York, and Sundance among its upcoming clients. The New Zealand-based company has provided secure press and industry screening platforms since 2008 and has now emerged as a leading company poised to tackle the challenge of creating online festivals. However, it’s hardly alone in an industry that has just gotten started and could be here for good.

More from IndieWire

In conversations with IndieWire, festival organizers discussed the frantic process of shopping for cost-effective platforms that could meet their needs on a tight schedule

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‘If I start university this year, I’m worried I won’t make friends or get the support I need’

Olivia dark, 18: ‘I’d mentally prepared to go this year and have no idea what I’d do in a gap year. I feel ready to start a new chapter in my life’ - JAY WILLIAMS
Olivia dark, 18: ‘I’d mentally prepared to go this year and have no idea what I’d do in a gap year. I feel ready to start a new chapter in my life’ – JAY WILLIAMS

For countless British school leavers, the emotional maelstrom of the past few months didn’t end on Thursday when A-level results were announced.

This weekend, many Year 13 students are grappling with the dilemma of what to do next. Accept a university offer, even though they might miss out on the full student experience because of the pandemic? Or defer or reject a place, until some semblance of normality returns?

With little or no face-to-face teaching at universities until 2021, the prospect of starting an expensive degree just doesn’t add up for some students.

There are also fears that all the fun of starting university, and opportunities to make friends, will be missing because freshers’ week

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Young people struggle with finding mental health support amid COVID-19 pandemic

Kathryn Boit feels “guilty for struggling so much” these past few months. 

As president of the Harvard Student Mental Health Liaisons, she has “college friends, acquaintances and strangers reach out to me for resources and advice,” she said. “I don’t know the answers anymore.”

It’s no wonder Boit, a Harvard sophomore, feels overwhelmed. Prevalence of depression among college students increased since the pandemic closed campuses this spring compared with fall 2019, according to a survey of 18,000 college students published by the Healthy Minds Network on July 9. And of the nearly 42% of students who sought mental health care during the pandemic, 60% said it was either much more or somewhat more difficult to access care.

Mental health among young people has been worsening for years. A 2019 analysis of teens reported 13% of U.S. teens ages 12 to 17 (or 3.2 million) said in 2017 that they had

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Britain faces up to prospect of mass unemployment as government support winds

Getty
Getty

“I literally don’t know what I would do.” says freelance chef Ryan Fisher as he considers the prospect trying to live off £343 per month universal credit – again.

The amount is £200 less than he pays each month to support his nine-year-old daughter, never mind his rent, food, gas, electricity, car insurance.

“I don’t know how I’ll cover all my bills. It’s just not enough to live on.”

He knows this from bitter experience because he’s been there before, when the government forcibly shut down his industry in March and work, which had been plentiful, dried up. Like millions of others, Fisher wasn’t entitled to any of the coronavirus support schemes.

After three months of debts piling up, calls from credit card companies and an emergency £500 grant from charity Turn2Us he found some short-term work at Porters, an upper-class eatery in Southampton.

For now, as the sun

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Young people struggle with finding mental health support amid COVID pandemic

Kathryn Boit feels “guilty for struggling so much” these past few months. 

As the president of the Harvard Student Mental Health Liaisons, she has “college friends, acquaintances, and strangers reach out to me for resources and advice,” she said. “I don’t know the answers anymore.”

It’s no wonder Boit, a Harvard sophomore, feels overwhelmed. Prevalence of depression among college students increased since the pandemic caused the closure of campuses this spring compared to fall 2019, according to a survey of 18,000 college students published by the Healthy Minds Network on July 9. And of the nearly 42% of students who sought mental health care during the pandemic, 60% said it was either much more or somewhat more difficult to access care.

Mental health among young people has been worsening for years. A 2019 analysis of teens reported 13% of U.S. teens ages 12 to 17 (or 3.2 million) said in

Read More