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Microban 24 Introduces New 24-Hour Science Experiment to Help Students Learn about Bacteria, No Matter Where They’re Learning

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

More than 9 in 10 of parents of school-aged kids (91%) feel that having the whole family learn about how to prevent the spread of bacteria would result in a healthier household, according to a new survey from Microban 24, a revolution in home sanitizing that protects surfaces against bacteria for 24 hours*. As children across the country settle into their new school year routines – whether in person or virtually – there is no better time to teach them about bacteria, and how to protect against them.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201006005305/en/

Microban 24 commissioned a survey** conducted online by The Harris Poll in September 2020 amongst over 500 parents of school-aged children (ages 6-17) to better understand how parents are preparing for a school year that is sure to

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Some South Florida CEOs say they’re still hiring

My company will not be hiring any new employees until our country can make some definitive decisions regarding the pandemic. If a vaccine is developed and our economy resorts back to a normal state of business I can say unequivocally that we would hire new employees by the first quarter of 2021.

Dexter Bridgeman, CEO, founder, M•I•A Media Group

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We have been committed to our bank team members from the onset of this horrible pandemic. In spite of lower levels of activity in some areas, we did not reduce any staffing levels. The last thing that we wanted to do was add to despair by laying anyone off, nor to put anyone on furlough. Our team members have been there for us and our clients and we are committed to being there for them. Last month we hired two new professionals and we are actively searching for two new

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Apps are tracking WhatsApp users’ online activity, including whom they’re likely talking to and when they’re sleeping

Hello everyone! Welcome to this weekly roundup of Business Insider stories from executive editor Matt Turner. Subscribe here to get this newsletter in your inbox every Sunday.

Read on for news about the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, WhatsApp-tracking apps that are letting people figure out when you’re sleeping, how home-listing site Zumper weeded out thousands of Section 8 renters, and a toxic culture in Yelp’s Phoenix office. 

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg. <p class="copyright">Drew Angerer/Getty Images</p>
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg.

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The death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is likely to make intense political polarization in the US even more severe.

Ginsburg’s death opened up a vacancy on the Supreme Court that President Trump said he will fill as quickly as possible. But a new national survey from Insider found that most respondents disagree with the plan to fill the seat as soon as possible. You can get the latest on the response to

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Lego Makes a Hundred Billion Bricks a Year. CEO Niels Christiansen on Why They’re Now More Important Than Ever

A portrait of LEGO CEO Niels Christiansen
A portrait of LEGO CEO Niels Christiansen

LEGO CEO Niels Christiansen Credit – LEGO

(Miss this week’s The Leadership Brief? This interview below was delivered to the inbox of Leadership Brief subscribers on Sunday morning, Sept. 20; to receive weekly emails of conversations with the world’s top CEOs and business decisionmakers, click here.)

“Washington Man Designs Lego Basilica Replica.” This is not an Onion headline. The global lockdown has driven many to distraction. For parents with young children, the restrictions and closures have made this a particularly bonkers time. In March, after Lego employees realized that nearly 90% of the world’s school-age kids were outside of their normal learning environments, they posted a number of play ideas and building suggestions online. The company says the digital content has reached more than 80 million users around the world, helping provide inspiration that has made the world’s living rooms awash with castles,

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This Site Used to Print Business Cards; Now They’re Letting You Create Your Own Face Masks

Wearing face masks and social distancing have become a new normal for many Americans, as more than half of U.S. states have instituted mask mandates and other safety guidelines to prevent the spread of the coronavirus.

As the U.S. continues its effort in fighting Covid-19, non-medical masks have also become an opportunity for self-expression. One way to showcase your personality and style is through a custom face mask. While there are a number of sites offering stylish, pre-designed face coverings, the popular online printing company Vistaprint, is now offering an easy way to customize your face masks and even order them in bulk (say, if you want to order masks for your restaurant or small business).

vistaprint custom masks review

See all custom mask options on Vistaprint

What’s great about Vistaprint’s non-medical masks is that they’re designed to hold replaceable filters (available separately as 10-packs for $10), and they’re

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Billboards that follow you? It’s not sci-fi. They’re already here

Clear Channel Outdoor, one of the world’s largest billboard companies, will in coming days roll out technology across Europe capable of letting advertisers know where people go and what they do after seeing a particular billboard.

Sounds creepy, no?

Well, brace yourself. Clear Channel has been quietly using this technology in the United States for the last four years, including in Los Angeles.

“They’re spying on you in your own neighborhood,” said Jeff Chester, executive director of the Center for Digital Democracy.

“You don’t know it’s happening,” he told me. “You don’t know who they’re sharing the information with.”

Chester and other privacy advocates said Clear Channel’s system is an example of how private companies are building out commercial surveillance networks right under our noses.

“The scary thing is that there are so many companies handling different pieces of this, the ecosystem is enormous,” said Alan Butler, interim executive director

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Scammers tell people they’re fired or may have COVID-19

Job hunters have long been warned to watch out for the fake texts from phony employers and those $30 an hour, work-from-home job descriptions that sound just too good to be true.

Now, those who remain on the job must worry about the phony pink slip. 

As fear increasingly factors into our financial future, scammers have figured out yet another way to get people who are already on edge to quickly “click here” via a phishing email. And they’re playing up two of our biggest worries: getting sick or getting fired. 

Many people likely haven’t heard much about this scam yet. But fraudsters have been sending out large volumes of termination notices during the pandemic, according to Jessica Dore, an expert in technology risk management and a principal with Rehmann in the Saginaw, Michigan, office. 

Consumers are warned about fake contact tracing attempts that ask for your mailing address and

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7 Dads on How They’re Coping With Unemployment

The unemployment rate in America is at an all-time high. Depending on whose numbers you trust, the pandemic has pushed between 18 and 30 million Americans out of the workforce. And these concerning numbers aren’t exclusive to the U.S. The COVID pandemic has made jobs disappear across the globe, in industries ranging from photography to farming and financial work. Millions are struggling. Coping with unemployment is never easy. 

Women have lost the majority of jobs under the pandemic but men haven’t been spared from unemployment. While the job loss seen during COVID is unprecedented and many employees will return once the pandemic is controlled, research suggests that the loss of a job hits fathers particularly hard. When men are fired or furloughed, the stress it creates can lead to a number of psychological and physical effects, including weight gain or loss, depression, anxiety, sleep troubles, and high blood pressure.

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More than 1,000 aspiring surgeons couldn’t take a critical online exam after the system failed. Now they’re left worried it may never happen.

surgeon
surgeon

HRAUN/Getty Images

  • An exam taken by surgeons in the US saw its online system fail Thursday, leaving more than 1,000 aspiring surgeons in the dark on when — or if — they will take the test.

  • The test is a critical and costly part of transitioning from medical resident to a board-certified surgeon. 

  • The American Board of Surgery runs the tests and used a virtual proctor company called Proctortrack to give the test. 

  • Four aspiring surgeons told Business Insider they were frustrated with the lack of transparency and incompetence from the organization. The unknown delay could make it difficult for them to take the exam later, which requires weeks of intense studying beforehand.

  • “I have to start working,” one said. “I don’t have the financial security to sit back for a month and not be paid.”

  • For more stories like this, sign up here for our healthcare newsletter, Dispensed.

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More than 1,000 aspiring surgeons couldn’t take a critical online exam after the system failed. Now, they’re left worried if it’ll ever happen.

surgeon
surgeon

HRAUN/Getty Images

  • An exam taken by surgeons in the US saw its online system fail Thursday, leaving more than 1,000 aspiring surgeons in the dark on when — or if — they will take the test.

  • The test is a critical and costly part of transitioning from medical resident to a board-certified surgeon. 

  • The American Board of Surgery runs the tests and used a virtual proctor company called Proctortrack to give the test. 

  • Four aspiring surgeons, speaking anonymously to Business Insider, said they are frustrated with the lack of transparency and incompetence from the organization. The unknown delay could make it difficult for them to take the exam later, which requires weeks of intense studying beforehand.

  • “I have to start working,” one said. “I don’t have the financial security to sit back for a month and not be paid.”

  • For more stories like this, sign up here for our

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