week

A Week At A University In Detroit, MI, That Costs $30,000 A Year

Welcome to Money Diaries College Edition where we are tackling the ever-present taboo that is money. We’re asking real people how they spend their hard-earned money during a seven-day period — and we’re tracking every last dollar.

Today: a public health major at a university that costs $30,000 per year who spends some of her money this week on a cupcake.

Major: Public Health with Pre-Med
Age: 21
Location: Detroit, MI
University Size: 25,000
Yearly Tuition Cost: $30,000 (I am on a full merit scholarship that covers my tuition, housing, and meal plan)
Current Student Loan Total: $0
Salary/Allowance: I work as an MCAT tutor, which pays $25 an hour (I work three hours a week) and as a peer mentor for my university, which pays $10 an hour (our hours were reduced to 10 hours/week due to COVID)
Paycheck Amount (Every two weeks): $275
Pronouns: She/her

Monthly Expenses

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$800 a week to test employees for COVID-19. Could rapid, cheap tests help?

Sara Polon spends $800 dollars each week on coronavirus tests for the staffers at her Washington, D.C., business, but sometimes the test results don’t come back for weeks.

Polon, 43, owns Soupergirl, a small soup company that has managed to stay open during the pandemic. Polon wanted to reassure her 30 full-time and part-time employees that she was trying to protect their health, so she’s been covering their weekly coronavirus tests since early June. But the national lab where the results are processed has significant backlogs.

“If I’m getting results 2 1/2 weeks later, I might as well just take that $800 and flush it down the toilet,” Polon told NBC News. “I’m just at the mercy of these national labs, and it’s petrifying.”

What Polon needs is a cheaper test with fast results that her employees could use at home, experts say. To ease the overwhelmed testing system, a

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A Week In Mesa, AZ, On A $62,000 Salary

Welcome to Money Diaries, where we’re tackling what might be the last taboo facing modern working women: money. We’re asking women how they spend their hard-earned money during a seven-day period — and we’re tracking every last dollar.

Are you starting your first year of college this fall? Will you be tuning into virtual classes from your childhood bedroom? Email us here to share your story.

Today: a system analyst who makes $62,000 per year and spends some of her money on a True & Co bra.

Occupation: System Analyst
Industry: Higher Education
Age: 26
Location: Mesa, AZ
My Salary: $62,000 (plus a tuition waiver of $4,763 for the spring semester of grad school, I will get an additional waiver for the summer)
Husband’s Salary: $68,500
Net Worth: -$6,000 (My retirement (401(k) and two IRAs) is around $30,000, and then we have a mix of Fidelity, Ally, and Edward … Read More

Stimulus package deal expected by end of week; US nears 5M cases; Clorox wipes shortage could stretch into 2021

A second round of coronavirus stimulus checks? Maybe.

Top Democrats and negotiators from the White House say a stimulus deal could be reached by the end of the week and approved as early as the following week, That could be good news for tens of millions of unemployed Americans whose $600 weekly boost in unemployment benefits has expired.

“We have to have an agreement, and we will have an agreement,” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said.

Novavax Inc., of Gaithersburg, Maryland, became the fifth vaccine developer to release promising results of an early trial. The federal government is paying $1.6 billion to Novavax for 100 million doses.

Here are some significant developments:

  • Democrats, White House optimistic stimulus deal could be reached this week after both sides make concessions.

  • A group of voters backed by Republican lawmakers sued Minnesota state and local officials to try to block a face mask requirement at

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A Week As An Unemployed Student In New York

Attention retail workers: How do you feel about stores closing on Thanksgiving Day this year? Share your thoughts and opinions here, and they could be used in an upcoming story.

Welcome to Money Diaries — College Edition where we are tackling the ever-present taboo that is money. We’re asking real people how they spend their hard-earned money during a seven-day period — and we’re tracking every last dollar.

Today: a human development major in New York who pays $23,000 a year for tuition and spends some of her money this week on a frog statue.

Major: Human Development 
Age: 19
University Size: 14,000
University Location: New York State, but I am currently living at home in NYC
Salary/Allowance: $200/month from my grandparents
Yearly Cost Of Tuition: $23,000 (My grandparents give me $10,000 per school year, and I pay the rest with loans)
Student Loans Total: $11,000, currently (I have

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An Extra $600 a Week Kept Many Jobless Workers Afloat. Now What Will They Do?

Rebecca Mallery, who is applying for subsidized housing for herself, and her 9-year-old son, Chord Pagel, outside her home in Bullhead City, Ariz. on July 28, 2020. (Joe Buglewicz/The New York Times)
Rebecca Mallery, who is applying for subsidized housing for herself, and her 9-year-old son, Chord Pagel, outside her home in Bullhead City, Ariz. on July 28, 2020. (Joe Buglewicz/The New York Times)

For Sara Gard, the government’s safety net moved smoothly into place when the coronavirus pandemic upended her family’s lives. Jobless benefit checks began arriving a few days after she was furloughed in April from an entertainment company in Atlanta. A $600 weekly supplement, part of an emergency federal program, would cover the mortgage until her company resumed operations — probably in June.

June came and went, and the reopening was pushed to August. Now August is near, the business is still shuttered, and the weekly benefit booster has run out.

“When the $600 is gone, we’re going to totally have to rethink our lives because we don’t have a way to pay the mortgage,” Gard said. Without it,

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A Small Georgia City Plans to Put Students in Classrooms This Week

Jefferson High seniors Hope Terhune and Rylee Meadows, who started a petition drive calling for a mandatory mask rule, in Jefferson, Ga., an hour's drive north of Atlanta, July 24, 2020. (Melissa Golden/The New York Times)
Jefferson High seniors Hope Terhune and Rylee Meadows, who started a petition drive calling for a mandatory mask rule, in Jefferson, Ga., an hour’s drive north of Atlanta, July 24, 2020. (Melissa Golden/The New York Times)

JEFFERSON, Ga. — When Jennifer Fogle and her family moved from Indiana to Georgia 13 years ago, they settled in Jefferson, a small, handsome city an hour’s drive from Atlanta, because they had heard about the excellent schools. And until recently, they had little to complain about. The teachers are passionate and committed, and the facilities rival those found at some private schools.

But in recent days Fogle found herself uncharacteristically anxious, after learning that Jefferson City Schools planned to offer face-to-face instruction in the midst of a resurgent coronavirus pandemic that has seen thousands of new cases reported daily in Georgia.

As other districts around the state delayed their back-to-school days or moved

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How the Fed could push mortgage rates even lower this week

Both homebuyers and homeowners are loving today’s record-breaking mortgage rates, which have been averaging less than 3% for the very first time. As rates have made history this month, mortgage applications have been rising.

Borrowers owe the Federal Reserve a big thank you for the plunging rates on new and refinance home loans, and Fed policymakers who meet this week could help push them even lower.

America’s central bank is expected to stick with and even sharpen its coronavirus-fighting policies that have driven interest rates down. Fed officials also are likely to spread more gloom about the economy — and when Fed chief Jerome Powell and his colleagues get grim, mortgage rates tend to drop.

What the Fed is likely to do

Paul Brady Photography / Shutterstock

Let’s get this out of the way first thing: No one’s expecting the Fed’s policy panel to make any changes in interest

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Jeff Bezos is now so rich he could never spend the money he earned in a single day this week

AFP
AFP

“I mean, what’s he going to do with it all. What can you spend all that money on?”

The question was asked of me by the finance director of a big UK bank who, while he admitted that he “got plenty of money”, was still simply staggered by what one of the former CEOs of one of its constituent parts had made – and was still making, through a truly vast pension. They were, at the time, a cause of some controversy given the grim road down which they’d led the company.

Although rhetorical, it was a good question. Yet that former CEO was a veritable pauper by comparison to the Amazon boss Jeff Bezos.

On Monday, shares in the online giant took on some rocket fuel and headed off for Mars, like Bezos presumably hopes his space exploration company will one day do. Having ended last week at

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A Week In Seattle, WA, On A $73,000 Salary

Welcome to Money Diaries where we are tackling the ever-present taboo that is money. We’re asking real people how they spend their hard-earned money during a seven-day period — and we’re tracking every last dollar.

Today: a Clinical Research Coordinator who makes $73,000 per year and spends some of her money this week on a mint plant.

Occupation: Clinical Research Coordinator
Industry: Oncology
Age: 28
Location: Seattle, WA
Salary: $73,000
Net Worth: The only money I have saved is $15,000 in my retirement account, however, my net worth is still negative due to my student loans.
Debt: $180,000 (student loans)
Paycheck Amount (1x/month): $4,700
Pronouns: She/her

Monthly Expenses
Rent: $1,700, of which my boyfriend pays $700 (rent includes utilities)
Student Loans: $0 (My student loans are normally about $1,800 but they are on hold right now while I get my MBA)
Streaming Services: $60
Internet: $50
Pet Insurance: $60 (It’s

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