Write

‘Don’t make us write obituaries’

“Don’t make us write obituaries.”

This is the jarring plea that editors at The Observer — the student-run publication that covers Notre Dame, Saint Mary’s University and Holy Cross College — made on the newspaper’s front page on Friday, August 21. After learning of the university’s decision to temporarily suspend in-person classes rather than give everyone the option to go home (like The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC) recently announced they were going to do), the concerned students asked the question on everyone’s minds: Why?

“We longed to return to South Bend while in quarantine last semester,” the editors wrote. “Now, we are at risk of hurting the community we’ve come to know and love.”

Since Notre Dame began its fall semester on August 10, university officials have been under scrutiny for their mishandling of COVID-19 outbreaks on campus. As of August 27, the university has tested

Read More

Indiana College Students Plead ‘Don’t Make Us Write Obituaries’ in COVID-19 Newspaper Editorial

coronavirus seriously so that they don’t have to write obituaries for their peers, professors, and other campus employees.” data-reactid=”20″Students from three colleges and universities near South Bend, Indiana, are pleading with their campus communities to take the coronavirus seriously so that they don’t have to write obituaries for their peers, professors, and other campus employees.

an editorial published on Friday in The Observer, the student-run newspaper for the University of Notre Dame, Saint Mary’s College and Holy Cross College, students spoke out about their concerns over the virus and begged for the tri-campus community to stay vigilant in order to curb the spread.” data-reactid=”21″In an editorial published on Friday in The Observer, the student-run newspaper for the University of Notre Dame, Saint Mary’s College and Holy Cross College, students spoke out

Read More

How To Write Your Stanford GSB Essay

Andrew Brodhead – Stanford News

Stanford’s Graduate School of Business consistently ranks as one of the most prestigious b-schools in the world.

To maintain its prestige, the b-school is highly selective of who it accepts.

Matt Symonds, co-founder and director of Fortuna Admissions, recently discussed what kind of applicants Stanford GSB looks for and how applicants can write strong essays.

WHO GSB SEEKS

The ideal student at Stanford GSB, according to the school’s evaluation criteria, is someone who possesses three main characteristics: intellectual vitality, demonstrated leadership potential, and personal qualities and contributions.

“Stanford is looking not just for extremely bright and successful professionals, but also young people who have strong values, and who want to have a positive impact in the world,” Fortuna’s Heidi Hillis, Stanford GSB alum and former alumni interviewer, says. “The school genuinely wants to get to know you and to understand your values. Stanford MBAs are

Read More