Day: July 19, 2020

Is it racist if I don’t want to date outside my own race?

"But Damona, isn't it my choice who I date?" <span class="copyright">(Ross May / Los Angeles Times; Getty Images)</span>
“But Damona, isn’t it my choice who I date?” (Ross May / Los Angeles Times; Getty Images)

L.A. love coach Damona Hoffman tackles dating and relationship questions on her weekly podcast, “Dates & Mates.” She said she receives many topical, thought-provoking relationship questions, but none has ever struck a chord with listeners like this one:

Dear Damona: Am I racist if I don’t want to date outside my race?

While being #woke is currently trending on Twitter as I write this, for the last 15 years I’ve contemplated the relationship between race and romance and coached my clients to be “race-open” when they date, because it expands our view of the world and increases your odds of meeting someone special. This practice has been met with many objections along the way.

The first objection I hear when I suggest this: “But Damona, isn’t it my choice who I

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How New York Galleries Are Reopening

Click here to read the full article.

In mid-March, as the coronavirus pandemic brought New York to a standstill, many galleries had to shutter for a month-long period. Now, as New York City’s reopening continues apace, those art spaces are beginning to reopen their doors with increased safety precautions. Many ask visitors to book appointments online before stopping by, and some have taken extra precautions of other kinds.

Galleries across the city have begun to implement Acuity Scheduling’s digital appointment system, which many have started using on their websites. Among those using the system are Chelsea galleries Kasmin, Greene Naftali, and Galerie Lelong & Co., as well as the Lower East Side’s Derek Eller Gallery and Tribeca’s James Cohan. But for most, a digital system wasn’t enough to reopen as the city moved into Phase III of its reopening—changes to the physical layout of the gallery had to be made

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EBay Seeks To Retain Stake in Classifieds Unit, Challenging Prosus Bid; Top Analyst Raises PT

EBay Inc. (EBAY) reportedly prefers to keep a stake in the classified advertising unit it’s selling, reducing the odds that Prosus NV will win the hotly-contested auction.

The decision made at a board meeting on Friday gives a surprise likelihood to a bid from Norwegian online marketplace Adevinta ASA, which offered a mix of cash and stock and would leave EBay with a significant stake in the combined business, Bloomberg reported. A combination of the classifieds unit with the listed Scandinavian firm would also allow EBay to benefit from any future increase in the shares.

Separately, a private equity consortium backed by Blackstone Group Inc. (BX), Permira and Hellman & Friedman has been interested in the unit and also offered to let EBay keep a minority stake.

Until as recently as Friday, Naspers Ltd.-owned Prosus was considered to be the front runner for a deal after

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White House ‘red zone’ warning, DeSantis ‘pretty good shape’ message, and, oh, crowded primaries

It’s Monday, July 20. Fifty-one years ago today, Apollo 11 landed two men on the moon. Today, the nation is asking its people to follow much simpler science and halt the spread of the coronavirus.

One small step might be to wear a mask. It may also take another shutdown in parts of Florida, where Miami-Dade, Broward and Hillsborough counties represented 41% of new cases in the state last week. And it takes a messaging strategy that persuades.

Our moon shot: We now know three things: mask wearing and social distancing must become the norm, the investment into contact tracing and rapid testing must be done in exponentially higher numbers than they have been in Florida, and government must make available isolation hotels for those who test positive and do not have a place to quarantine.

Let’s take a look at where Florida policy is in that context.

We’re a

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As the Virus Deepens Financial Trouble, Colleges Turn to Layoffs

Dorms on East Green at Ohio University in Athens, Ohio, June 21, 2020. (Maddie McGarvey/The New York Times)
Dorms on East Green at Ohio University in Athens, Ohio, June 21, 2020. (Maddie McGarvey/The New York Times)

LAKEWOOD, Ohio — Hammered by mounting coronavirus costs and anticipating lost revenue from international students, fall sports and state budgets gutted by the pandemic, colleges and universities nationwide have begun eyeing what until now has been seen as a last resort — thinning the ranks of their faculty.

The University of Akron this week became one of the first schools in the country to make deep cuts in the number of full-time professors on its staff, with the board of trustees voting Wednesday to lay off about a fifth of the university’s unionized workforce to balance its budget, including nearly 100 faculty members.

Other universities have also trimmed teaching positions, although most have limited themselves to those without tenure. This month, the University of Texas at San Antonio laid off 69 instructors,

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Is ‘cancel culture’ really a threat to free speech?

“The 360” shows you diverse perspectives on the day’s top stories and debates.

What’s happening

The phrase “Twitter, do your thing” can set off a potentially powerful series of events in what has become a repeated online phenomenon: A person or brand does something considered offensive or problematic, a social media user posts about it and the incident snowballs across the internet, allowing countless people to put pressure on a person or organization until that entity is “canceled.”

The idea of “cancel culture” — first coined by Black Twitter users — dates back to 2015 and began as a means of calling out friends or acquaintances. Since then it has evolved to targeting the powerful, sometimes with highly effective results (for example, the #MeToo movement and #OscarsSoWhite campaign). Public shaming is in no way new, but the internet has made the process of “canceling” even more potent and widespread.

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What we’ll lose if the pandemic puts an end to the sharing of food

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My 2-year-old has a hard time sharing. Open a bag of Goldfish crackers, and good luck getting one or two for yourself. Lucky for him, now that he spends most of his time within the confines of our home, he no longer has to do nearly as much sharing as before.

When my son’s Bay Area daycare shut down in mid-March, so did many of the opportunities for him to learn—and grapple with—the art and discipline of accepting that we don’t get everything to ourselves all the time. It’s an important lesson for toddlers. But lately, I’ve been thinking about how the pandemic, and all of the new restrictions the crisis has introduced into our daily life, has cut down on opportunities for us adults to learn to

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Arizona’s rugged individualism poses barrier to mask rules

PHOENIX (AP) — With the coronavirus spreading out of control and Arizona cities beginning just last month to require residents wear masks in public, a few hundred people gathered in Scottsdale to make clear they didn’t approve of the heavy hand of government telling them to cover their faces.

A city councilman, Guy Phillips, came to the podium and ripped off his black face mask, declaring, “I can’t breathe!”

He later insisted his comment was meant to highlight the oppressive nature of masks, not to mock the dying words of George Floyd under the knee of a Minneapolis police officer, though Phillips’ words were widely interpreted as racist.

The episode highlights the visceral opposition to government mandates, a fierce individualism that has endured among some in Arizona since the days of the Wild West. The buzz-off attitude is taking on new importance as the state has become one of the

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Which Online Bank Is Right for You?

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Online-only banks are attractive to anyone looking for a simple and convenient banking solution.

While most traditional branch banks offer online banking and mobile apps, digital banking platforms tend to blow them out of the water in user experience and convenience — because they’re created by technology companies.

These companies let you access the products and services you’re used to from traditional banks, but they layer on features through robust apps to help you simplify your life and work toward financial goals.

As the landscape for online banks becomes increasingly competitive, digital banking apps look more and more similar — but each stands out through unique features designed for specific lifestyles and financial goals.

Two leading players in the online

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Trump’s campaign to paint Biden as mentally unfit becomes a gamble

WASHINGTON – Less than four months from the November election, President Donald Trump’s attacks on presumptive Democratic nominee Joe Biden’s mental fitness are an integral part of the president’s re-election message: the focus of television advertisements, talking points and open challenges from the president.

But analysts have raised questions over whether Trump’s strategy of focusing on the former vice president’s age is backfiring with a key demographic – seniors.

Making it an even riskier play, the attacks have heightened expectations for Trump’s debate performances this fall and invited skepticism about his own fitness. The strategy itself has proven difficult to execute as Biden campaigns from his home in Delaware, limiting the gaffe-prone candidate’s opportunities for flubs.

For months, Biden, 77, has dismissed the name calling and innuendo but more recently he’s hitting back more forcefully and trying to turn the argument about mental fitness back on the 74-year-old Trump.

“This

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