Ginsburg’s granddaughter cuts election ad for progressive group: ‘Make her voice heard at the ballot box’

The granddaughter of late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Binsburg is calling on voters to

The granddaughter of late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Binsburg is calling on voters to honor Ginsburg’s legacy and “make her voice heard at the ballot box” in a new ad from liberal political advocacy groups MoveOn and Demand Justice. 

“To the world, she was an icon, the notorious RBG,” Clara Spera, a lawyer and women’s rights activist, begins in the ad

“But to me, she was Bubbie,” Spera says, referring to the Yiddish word for “grandmother.” 

“Her final wish was that her seat on the Supreme Court not be filled until after the election. It’s up to us to make her voice heard at the ballot box to keep fighting the battles she waged for women’s equality and justice for all,” Spera adds in the video, titled “Notorious.” 

Ginsburg died in September after losing a battle with pancreatic cancer. 

“My grandmother changed the course of history,” she continues, “Now it’s our turn.”

“Make a plan. Vote by Tuesday,” Spera tells viewers. 

Spera’s video appearance comes with just three before the presidential election, with Democratic nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden leads Trump by 8 points nationally: poll Ivanka Trump raises million in a week for father’s campaign On The Money: McConnell says Congress will take up stimulus package at start of 2021 | Lawmakers see better prospects for COVID deal after election MORE leading President TrumpDonald John TrumpStephen Miller: Trump to further crackdown on illegal immigration if he wins US records 97,000 new COVID-19 cases, shattering daily record Biden leads Trump by 8 points nationally: poll MORE in national polling. 

A Fox News poll released Friday showed Biden with an 8-point lead over Trump, 52 percent to 44 percent support.  

The most recent polling average from RealClearPolitics shows a similar margin, with Biden holding approximately 7.8 percentage points over the sitting president, although the race is much closer in key battleground states, including Florida and Pennsylvania. 

Following the news of Ginsburg’s passing, NPR reported that Ginsburg had told Spera, “my most fervent wish is that I will not be replaced until a new president is installed.”

However, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellTop Senate GOP super PAC makes final .6M investment in Michigan Senate race On The Money: McConnell says Congress will take up stimulus package at start of 2021 | Lawmakers see better prospects for COVID deal after election Overnight Health Care: House Dem report blasts Trump coronavirus response | Regeneron halts trial of antibody drug in sickest hospitalized patients | McConnell says Congress will take up stimulus package at start of 2021 MORE (R-Ky.), within hours of the news of Ginsburg’s passing, said that the upper chamber would vote on Trump Supreme Court pick before the election. 

Democrats repeatedly condemned the move, as well as the subsequent nomination and Senate Judiciary Committee hearings pushed forth by GOP lawmakers for Amy Coney BarrettAmy Coney BarrettThe truth, the whole truth about protecting preexisting conditions New Supreme Court presents an uncertain future for LGBTQ health McConnell plans to fill two key circuit court seats even if Trump loses MORE

Barrett was eventually confirmed in a 52-48 vote Monday along partisan lines. Only one GOP senator — Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsSusan Collins says systemic racism isn’t ‘a problem’ in Maine Biden, Cunningham hold narrow leads in North Carolina: poll GOP sees path to hold Senate majority MORE (Maine) — opposed Barrett’s nomination because of its proximity to Election Day.

Democrats and women’s rights advocates worry that the now 6-3 conservative majority on the high court will lead to the overturn of the historic landmark decision in Roe v. Wade, which legalized a woman’s right to an abortion. 

Ginsburg herself was seen by many as a champion for reproductive rights and equal access to healthcare for women. 

During Barrett’s confirmation hearings, she said that she did not consider Roe v. Wade a “superprecedent,” a term meaning a decision so widely accepted that it is invulnerable to serious legal challenges that could see it overturned.

However, Barrett has repeatedly declined to offer her personal opinion on various court rulings, including Roe v. Wade, arguing it would be a violation of judicial conduct.

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