Should You Go to Grad School?

By Ryan Lane College enrollment is down overall compared with last year due to the

By Ryan Lane

College enrollment is down overall compared with last year due to the coronavirus. But the economic effects of the pandemic may actually be pushing some students back to school.

“(It’s) probably the worst time to graduate from college in this generation,” says Doug Shapiro, executive director of the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center. “What are you going to do?”

The answer, for many, is getting additional education: As of Sept. 10, graduate program enrollment was up 3.9% and post-baccalaureate certificate program enrollment was up 24.2%, according to the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center.

    >> Plus, from Robert Powell’s Retirement Daily on TheStreet: Should We Worry About National Debt?

If you’re thinking about continuing your education — because you can’t get a job or lost yours — here’s what to consider before you enroll.

Know Your Timeline

It’s not surprising that recent college graduates or those who’ve lost jobs or been furloughed are looking to gain new skills.

Alana Burns, chief marketing officer of Southern New Hampshire University, said via email that the school saw similar behavior due to the 2008 recession.

Source Article