Small Business Owner Remains Creative During Pandemic

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Another one for the road as Troy Stacy prepares a “Pour and Play” delivery bundle, bringing draft beer and vinyl to your front door.    What You Need To Know The pandemic has halted the music industry as we know it with no return in sight Craft & […]

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Another one for the road as Troy Stacy prepares a “Pour and Play” delivery bundle, bringing draft beer and vinyl to your front door. 

 


What You Need To Know

  • The pandemic has halted the music industry as we know it with no return in sight
  • Craft & Vinyl recently began a “Pour and Play” delivery bundle, bringing draft beer and vinyl to your front door
  • Owner Troy Stacy is hopeful the Save Our Stages Act would make grants and loans available to live music venues across the state

 

Stacy, a musician himself, says the delivery service is a unique way to boost a customer’s mood during these tough times and maintain the connection while his storefront remains closed. 

“Beers can align with certain moods, music can align with certain mood, and putting them together, we call it our hop-sonic adventure of pairing these two things up to elevate the experience,” says Stacy.

In survival mode, Stacy has turned to e-commerce, launching an online store offering 60,000 new vinyl releases. 

He has found success and continues to deliver the “Pour and Play” bundles himself on the weekend. 

Still, the drummer feels for other musicians who are still unable to perform in public because of crowd-size restriction. 

“As musicians, we’re all emotional creatures. And we kind of feed on the energy that comes from performing in front of a live audience. And to not get that, to not get that validation for your art, sometimes, that stinks,” says Stacy.

Stacy is a strong proponent of the Save Our Stages Act which if passed by Congress would make grants and loans available to live music venues across the state. 

Stacy says music is the epicenter of culture, and that culture is at risk, but he’s trying to remain grateful and hopeful. 

“I don’t see live music, being able to continue the way that it has, without the type of programs that many other businesses have gotten. It’s not possible to be economically viable as a business when the engine of your business is gathering people together to experience live music. But i’m hopeful because nothing lasts forever,” says Stacy.

For more information on Craft and Vinyl or the “Pour and Play” bundles click here.

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