Business

Chamber Leaders Help Business Owners Navigate New Landscape

BUFFALO GROVE, IL — At a time often filled with cynicism in the business world due to the coronavirus pandemic, especially on the local level, Adriane Johnson remains optimistic. The president of the Buffalo Grove Lincolnshire Chamber of Commerce is drawing plenty of positivity from other area business owners.

“Overall, the vibe of our [Chamber] members is hope, continuous improvement, pivoting and innovation,” said Johnson, who founded Populus XP, LLCout of Riverwoods, in 2006. “Our members are resilient and are demonstrating the power of American ingenuity.”

The Chamber was formed in 2014 following a merger between the Buffalo Grove Area Chamber of Commerce (founded in 1972) and the Greater Lincolnshire Chamber of Commerce (1973). It is headquartered at 50 1/2 Raupp Blvd. in Buffalo Grove.

“Our members have pivoted in the pandemic and have embraced technology platforms like Zoom, to support the new virtual workforce and new way of doing

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Women of color have steeper climb when opening a business

GREENVILLE, S.C. – As a Clemson University student in the 90s, Nekita Sullivan and her friends had to pile in a car and drive to Greenville, Seneca or Anderson for Black beauty products and hair care. 

The inconvenience of traveling two or three towns over for beauty care gave Sullivan an idea: a multi-ethnic beauty bar where students and university employees of all races and hair textures could go in the heart of downtown Clemson. 

Sullivan finally realized that dream after more than 20 years, but she didn’t know how difficult it would be. 

Women, especially women of color, face more obstacles than their white, male counterparts when opening a small business, according to Ana Parra, director of the newly opened Women’s Business Center in Greenville. 

For Sullivan, it took nearly three years after signing a lease at U Center, a mixed-use building in downtown Clemson, to upfit her salon

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Google grilled on ad business dominance by U.S. Senate panel

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Alphabet Inc’s <GOOGL.O> Google faced a bipartisan buzzsaw of tough questions about its ad business in a hearing on Tuesday, with a particular focus on whether it misused its dominance in online advertising to drive profits.

Senator Mike Lee, a Republican and chair of the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee’s antitrust panel, pressed Google’s Don Harrison, who testified remotely, on the company’s dominance of the interlocking businesses which connect advertisers with newspapers, websites and other firms looking to host them.

“As that business has grown, so too have complaints that Google – which both operates the ad selling and buying platforms, and sells its own inventory through those platforms -has conflicts of interest and has manipulated or rigged online ad technologies and auctions to favor its own interest,” Lee said.

He and others pressed Harrison on advertiser complaints that Google was opaque where ad dollars went; specifically how

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Benzinga Launches The Industry’s Most Comprehensive Cannabis Business Network

Benzinga, the leader in cannabis industry news and events, with a focus on business and finance, has launched the Benzinga Cannabis Network. The network will allow companies to make new connections and attract new business, while showcasing their products and services.

The network is the largest and most comprehensive cannabis industry business database built to date. Coverage includes everything from dispensaries, to public companies, to professional service providers — like accountants, payment processors, and marketing agencies, to name a few.

“The cannabis industry is growing rapidly and the companies supporting that growth are looking at ways to stand out from their competition,” said Jason Raznick, CEO and Founder of Benzinga. “We created the Benzinga Cannabis Network as a way for cannabis businesses to have a better online presence and ultimately have an effective way to make connections and promote their services.”

Benzinga’s listings include all of the important information about

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Self-Care Is for Everyone and the Business of Viral Mental-Health Merch

The multi-tasking advocacy organization and retailer launched in 2018 with the mission to make healing resources more inclusive for all.

“I know there’s bummer stuff everywhere and it’s hard not to feel helpless sometimes,” Disney Channel alumna Debby Ryan wrote to her 15 million Instagram followers in a caption last March. “But your energy’s more valuable spent on the things you can do something about.”

The accompanying photo, a smiley selfie, was not unlike those that occupy Ryan’s feed. What was notable, though, was the sweatshirt Ryan was wearing in that pixelated rectangle: a dove grey crewneck emblazoned with a rainbow and doodly text that states, “You Are Enough.”

While Ryan didn’t tag the brand behind the pullover, fans (as fans are wont to do) tracked it down immediately. And today, you can get your own version for $39.95 courtesy of Self-Care Is for Everyone, a Philadelphia-based advocacy organization

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Google faces grilling on ad business before U.S. Senate antitrust panel

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Alphabet Inc’s Google will be questioned about its ad business in a hearing on Tuesday, with a particular focus expected on whether it misused its dominance in online advertising to drive profits.

Senator Mike Lee, a Republican and chair of the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee’s antitrust panel, is likely to also press Google on allegations that it is opaque in pricing advertising services, as its critics complain.

Lee is expected to express concern that Google may have broken U.S. antitrust law, a source close to the panel said.

The tech giant made a series of purchases, including DoubleClick and AdMob, to help make it the dominant player in online advertising. Google maintains a tight grasp over each of the many steps between an advertiser looking to place an ad and a website looking to host it.

The panel will hear from Don Harrison, who took over as

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What Citigroup’s new female CEO Jane Fraser means for business and the next generation

Citigroup’s announcement this week that Jane Fraser would become its next CEO is leading to applause nationwide. She is now the first woman to lead a major bank.

This comes as no surprise – especially with COVID changing so much of the way we live now and the #BlackLivesMatter movement calling for unprecedented action relating to women, diversity and equal opportunity.

CITI CEO MICHAEL CORBAT TO RETIRE IN FEBRUARY

And indeed, there are a host of incredible women in banking driving growth and innovation – from U.S. Bank’s Kate Quinn to Bank of America’s Cathy Bessant, to name a few.

But the implications are far greater than just having a woman at the top.

This generation has made a seismic shift in equality – something that is likely to trickle down to where they bank.

Imagine if the 170 million adult women – just over 50% of the U.S. population

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Your online branding is key to your business success. Here’s your roadmap

TLDR: With The All-In-One Digital Branding Certification Bundle, you’ll have all the training to get a new brand up and running across all the important digital avenues.

No matter how great your product or service is, without an easy, identifiable brand element to encapsulate it all, there’s a good chance your business will fly right past most modern digital audiences.

That means not only defining how you want your business to be seen online, but all the ways it’ll be seen and experienced, from images to text to social media. It’s a lot of ground to cover, but the training in The All-in-One Digital Branding Certification Bundle ($45, over 90 percent off from TNW Deals) explains the basic steps all the platform you have to know and master to get the most out of your business in the digital space.

The bundle features 10 courses with 37 hours of in-depth

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Business owners in college towns are ‘trying to do everything’ they can to stay afloat

Owner Claudio Gianello stands in the doorway of his temporarily closed Café Beaudelaire restaurant, on June 23, 2020, in Ames, Iowa, where the coronavirus surge is serious enough to prompt several business owners near the Iowa State University campus to close voluntarily just weeks after reopening. <p class="copyright"><a href="https://newsroom.ap.org/detail/VirusOutbreakCollegeTowns/865bbb449fc1427489f960e092d5d7e8/photo?Query=VIRUS%20OUTBREAK%20COLLEGE%20TOWNS&mediaType=photo,video&sortBy=arrivaldatetime:desc&dateRange=Anytime&totalCount=5&currentItemNo=4" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall</a></p>
Owner Claudio Gianello stands in the doorway of his temporarily closed Café Beaudelaire restaurant, on June 23, 2020, in Ames, Iowa, where the coronavirus surge is serious enough to prompt several business owners near the Iowa State University campus to close voluntarily just weeks after reopening.
  • Businesses in college towns in the US are still reeling from the mass exodus of students that began in the spring and has now remained into the fall.

  • Many schools have adopted online-only approaches to learning or implemented a hybrid approach that brings only some students back to campus.

  • As their primary clientele — students, their families, and other members of university communities — diminishes, some business owners face a difficult decision: temporarily shut down again or close forever.

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

For nearly a decade, Chris Carini has owned Linda’s Bar & Grill in Chapel Hill,

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Off the road since March, Miami-Dade’s scooter business awaits a COVID reprieve

In a Little Haiti warehouse, a good chunk of Miami’s once bustling scooter fleet sits in the dark, its pink wheels collecting dust.

Diego Perelmuter’s job is to tend to the hundreds of scooters Lyft dumped here on March 18, when Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Gimenez used emergency powers to order a halt to all bike and scooter rentals as a way to slow the spread of COVID-19.

It was the fifth of 83 emergency orders Gimenez would sign over six months, making scooter rentals one of the first industries to close in Miami-Dade. Unlike restaurants, malls, massage studios, barbershops, hotels, gyms, casinos and tattoo parlors, scooter rentals remain banned in Miami-Dade.

“Miami was one of our best performing markets,” said Perelmuter, an Aventura resident and Lyft’s operations manager for the area. The warehouse used to be be bustling with vans unloading dead scooters needing charges and loading powered ones ready

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