Film

All the best movies we saw at Toronto Film Festival, ranked (including ‘The Water Man’)

It’s definitely a different Toronto International Film Festival than usual, with a couch and a Keurig taking the place of theater seats and a coffeehouse stop.

In a year when everything in the movie industry has had to scramble amid COVID-19, Toronto (running through Sept. 19) is the biggest of the A-list film festivals to go virtual, with a reduced slate of movies for an event that’s considered one of the biggest kickoffs for Oscar season. Still, you can’t ignore its cache, even in a very strange 2020: The last five best-picture winners all played Toronto, so it might be the place that (at least virtually) launches, say, Chloe Zhao’s road drama “Nomadland” (starring Frances McDormand) or Francis Lee’s lesbian romance “Ammonite” (with Kate Winslet and Saoirse Ronan) into Academy Awards consideration. 

Save a seat for Frances McDormand: New drama ‘Nomadland’ is Oscar-ready

‘Penguin Bloom’: Naomi Watts was ‘the most

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All the best movies we saw at Toronto Film Festival, ranked (including ‘Good Joe Bell’)

It’s definitely a different Toronto International Film Festival than usual, with a couch and a Keurig taking the place of theater seats and a coffeehouse stop.

In a year when everything in the movie industry has had to scramble amid COVID-19, Toronto (running through Sept. 19) is the biggest of the A-list film festivals to go virtual, with a reduced slate of movies for an event that’s considered one of the biggest kickoffs for Oscar season. Still, you can’t ignore its cache, even in a very strange 2020: The last five best-picture winners all played Toronto, so it might be the place that (at least virtually) launches, say, Chloe Zhao’s road drama “Nomadland” (starring Frances McDormand) or Francis Lee’s lesbian romance “Ammonite” (with Kate Winslet and Saoirse Ronan) into Academy Awards consideration. 

Save a seat for Frances McDormand: New drama ‘Nomadland’ is Oscar-ready

‘Penguin Bloom’: Naomi Watts was ‘the most

Read More

All the best movies we saw at Toronto Film Festival, ranked (including ‘Concrete Cowboy’)

It’s definitely a different Toronto International Film Festival than usual, with a couch and a Keurig taking the place of theater seats and a coffeehouse stop.

In a year when everything in the movie industry has had to scramble amid COVID-19, Toronto (running through Sept. 19) is the biggest of the A-list film festivals to go virtual, with a reduced slate of movies for an event that’s considered one of the biggest kickoffs for Oscar season. Still, you can’t ignore its cache, even in a very strange 2020: The last five best-picture winners all played Toronto, so it might be the place that (at least virtually) launches, say, Chloe Zhao’s road drama “Nomadland” (starring Frances McDormand) or Francis Lee’s lesbian romance “Ammonite” (with Kate Winslet and Saoirse Ronan) into Academy Awards consideration. 

Save a seat for Frances McDormand: New drama ‘Nomadland’ is Oscar-ready

‘Penguin Bloom’: Naomi Watts was ‘the most

Read More

All the best movies we saw at Toronto Film Festival, ranked (including ‘MLK/FBI’)

It’s definitely a different Toronto International Film Festival than usual, with a couch and a Keurig taking the place of theater seats and a coffeehouse stop.

In a year when everything in the movie industry has had to scramble amid COVID-19, Toronto (running through Sept. 19) is the biggest of the A-list film festivals to go virtual, with a reduced slate of movies for an event that’s considered one of the biggest kickoffs for Oscar season. Still, you can’t ignore its cache, even in a very strange 2020: The last five best-picture winners all played Toronto, so it might be the place that (at least virtually) launches, say, Chloe Zhao’s road drama “Nomadland” (starring Frances McDormand) or Francis Lee’s lesbian romance “Ammonite” (with Kate Winslet and Saoirse Ronan) into Academy Awards consideration. 

Save a seat for Frances McDormand: New drama ‘Nomadland’ is Oscar-ready

‘Penguin Bloom’: Naomi Watts was ‘the most

Read More

Here’s how the 2020 Toronto International Film Festival will make you love movies again

Kate Winslet and Saoirse Ronan in <em>Ammonite</em>. (Photo: Courtesy of TIFF)
Kate Winslet and Saoirse Ronan in Ammonite. (Photo: Courtesy of TIFF)

In most years, September is the time when moviemakers, movie stars, movie journalists and movie lovers alike head to Canada for the Toronto International Film Festival, a weeklong celebration of cinema… and the official launch of awards season. But 2020 isn’t most years. Due to the coronavirus pandemic, this edition of TIFF will be offering a mixture of virtual screenings, as well as outdoor events and limited in-person theatrical showings for Toronto-based film fans.

Outside of select events, American audiences won’t be able to attend TIFF either remotely or in real life: Virtual screenings are exclusive to Canada, and the U.S./Canada border remains closed to travelers. But the festival is still a key part of the moviegoing calendar, setting the tone for the awards season to come by launching high-profile films from past Oscar winners like Regina King,

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How Independent Film Is Getting Going Again

Are there signs of green shoots of recovery for the indie film industry following the profound business disruption wrought by the COVID-19 pandemic?

“We’re living through a rapidly changing time,” says Brian Beckman, CFO of international sales company and producer Arclight Films, which is handling worldwide sales on “The Furnace,” an Australian adventure story, screening in Venice Film Festival’s Horizons section. “I think it feels like the worst part of the situation is now behind us.”

Physical production remains a challenge for independent filmmakers, amid continuing difficulties in securing COVID-19 production insurance as well as international travel restrictions.

However, many independents realize that there is now a unique window of opportunity for those who are able to make and deliver films.

Some have risked shooting films without specific COVID-19 related insurance, such as L.A.-based finance, production and distribution firm Voltage Pictures and producer/financier Limelight. Others, such as Arclight, are working

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AARP Takes Another Step Into Film Business With Release of ‘Care to Laugh’

AARP is no stranger to producing video content.” data-reactid=”19″AARP is no stranger to producing video content.

AARP Studios premiered the six-episode “Date My Grandma” on its YouTube channel last year. Don Rickles’ final project before he passed away in 2017 was AARP’s “Dinner With Don,” a web talk show in which the legendary comedian interviewed his famous friends, including Robert De Niro, Billy Crystal, Jimmy Kimmel, Amy Poehler and Marissa Tomei.” data-reactid=”20″The non-profit’s in-house production company AARP Studios premiered the six-episode “Date My Grandma” on its YouTube channel last year. Don Rickles’ final project before he passed away in 2017 was AARP’s “Dinner With Don,” a web talk show in which the legendary comedian interviewed his famous friends, including Robert De Niro, Billy Crystal, Jimmy Kimmel, Amy Poehler and Marissa Tomei.

Care to Laugh,” a documentary that follows comedian

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As Film Festivals Go Online, a Competitive New Business Takes Shape to Support Them

As the pandemic forced shutdowns worldwide, no aspect of the film industry faced a more immediate existential threat than the festival circuit. While mainstays from Cannes to Telluride chose not to hold events at all, others did the once-unthinkable: They migrated online. Now, the race is on to provide digital services that support the unexpected era of the virtual film festival.

Enter Shift72, which counts Toronto, New York, and Sundance among its upcoming clients. The New Zealand-based company has provided secure press and industry screening platforms since 2008 and has now emerged as a leading company poised to tackle the challenge of creating online festivals. However, it’s hardly alone in an industry that has just gotten started and could be here for good.

More from IndieWire

In conversations with IndieWire, festival organizers discussed the frantic process of shopping for cost-effective platforms that could meet their needs on a tight schedule

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Technology to Play Increasing Role in Film Festivals and Markets, Locarno Panelists Say

Day three of the Locarno Film Festival StepIn 2020, moderated by Variety‘s Leo Barraclough and hosted by the Variety Streaming Room platform, brought professionals from various parts of the film festival and market sectors together for a panel on the Future of Film Festivals and Film Markets.

Jérôme Paillard, executive director of Cannes Film Market; Lili Hinstin, artistic director of the Locarno Film Festival; Alberto Barbera, artistic director of the Venice Film Festival; Sarah Schweitzman, from CAA’s Film Finance and Sales Group, which helped set up the agency-led virtual film market at Cannes; and Tabitha Jackson, director of Sundance Film Festival, made up the panel’s members.

More from Variety

As many events this year have gone virtual on account of the COVID-19 pandemic, some film festivals also had to adapt and utilize online platforms, including Cannes. The panelists noted that the virtual route has so far offered both positive

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‘Why do we need to offer people gratuitous sex in film? There’s plenty of porn online’

Getty
Getty

Timothy Dalton has a laugh like a pantomime villain. Rich, deep and playfully thespy, it booms from our Zoom chat as his press team asks me to pivot my camera away from a nice blank wall towards a pile of unwashed laundry, to improve the lighting. The laughter erupts again when he spots my broken hoover.

I’m rewarded with a third, expansive peal when I tell the 74-year-old actor that my 10-year-old son – eavesdropping from the hall earlier as I watched the delectably surreal but 18-rated series Doom Patrol – said of Dalton’s performance as Niles “Chief” Caulder: “His voice is a massive spoiler! I mean, the posh English guy in an American action thing? You just know he’s going to turn out to be a baddie! Even if he’s a good guy for now.”

“Good for your son!” Dalton chuckles. “After I shot my very first scene

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