happen

Millions of Brits regret ‘it won’t happen to me’ attitude after being caught out

Millions of adults admit they have an ‘it won’t happen to me’ attitude in life with regards to insurance – and have been caught out as a result.

A study of 2,000 Brits found 16 per cent didn’t insure a phone as they believed it would not break – only to regret it – while 13 per cent did the same with kitchen appliances.

A further 13 per cent admitted they didn’t bother to install online security believing they wouldn’t fall victim to a scam, only to find themselves clicking on something they shouldn’t.

And more than one in 10 have also tried to save money by going without breakdown cover on their car, but ended up needing assistance at the roadside.

One in 10 have also tried to save money by going without breakdown cover on their car

But this attitude

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Happy Death Day 3 May Finally Happen as a Premium Streaming Release

Even though it once seemed like a borderline impossibility, Happy Death Day 3 now has new life. Producer Jason Blum has revealed that he has every intention to make the planned third movie in the time-bending slasher trilogy. What’s more, the recent trend of premium VOD releases may be the thing that gets it done.

Blumhouse Productions head Jason Blum is currently promoting the release of Welcome to the Blumhouse, a series of four movies produced by the studio that are heading to Amazon Prime Video this Halloween season. During a recent interview, Blum was asked about the status of Happy Death Day 3. He explained that director Christopher Landon still wants to do it and that they may give it a go following the release of his new movie Freaky. Here’s what Blum had to say about it.

RELATED: Happy Death Day 3 Gets a Working

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Can long-distance triathlon go mainstream? One Welsh billionaire is trying to make it happen

When the Professional Triathletes Organisation earlier this year announced a groundbreaking investment from Wales’ richest man to aid its vision of an expanded sport run by and for its athletes, it — like the rest of the world — had little idea of the Covid-19 turbulence that lay ahead.

The core ambition was simple: boosted by a $12.5 million (£9.5m) injection from billionaire venture capitalist Sir Michael Moritz, the PTO planned to take long-distance triathlon (anything longer than Olympic distance) mainstream. Moritz would retain a 50 per cent stake and the other half would belong to the triathletes themselves, in the form of membership to the PTO.

Thanks to Moritz, there were huge sums involved: a $2m (£1.5m) prize pot in the inaugural Collins Cup, an event originally scheduled for May and intended to launch the new era with Europe taking on teams from the United States and Rest of

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I was a Chinese grad student and lost all of my money in a scam. How could it happen to me?

Xinlu Liang, 22, a Chinese grad student who lost all her money in a telephone scam. <span class="copyright">(Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times)</span>
Xinlu Liang, 22, a Chinese grad student who lost all her money in a telephone scam. (Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times)

“Hi, is that Xinlu Liang?” The caller, speaking in Chinese, woke me from a nap. “This is a call from UPS. You have a suspicious package blocked at Chinese customs” in Beijing.

The person on the other end of the line said he was checking the information on the mailing label. “If you didn’t send this package, then your personal information may have been leaked. We suggest you report this to the Chinese police.”

I’d arrived in Los Angeles just 45 days earlier — at the end of June 2019 — to start work on a master’s degree in journalism at USC, and every day was a struggle: seven hours of classes, Tuesday through Friday, followed by many more hours of writing.

I lived in an apartment near

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America Has Been Failing Mothers for a Long Time. The Pandemic Made It Clear What Needs to Happen

In 1974, humorist Erma Bombeck published a syndicated newspaper column that looms over the lives of American mothers whether they’ve read it or not. In “When God Created Mothers,” Bombeck describes God making a mother with the help of an angel. “She has to be completely washable, but not plastic. Have 180 movable parts … all replaceable,” God tells the angel. “Run on black coffee and leftovers. Have a lap that disappears when she stands up. A kiss that can cure anything from a broken leg to a disappointed love affair. And six pairs of hands.”

My mother, who homeschooled eight children, saw that column as a mark of her valor. Not only did it hang on our wall at home, I grew up hearing it quoted in church sermons on Mother’s Day.

But once I became a mother, I came to hate that column. I think Erma Bombeck did

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‘What’s going to happen to that terrific little town?’

Director Ron Howard may be a Hollywood icon, but it was his ties to Northern California that convinced him to make “Rebuilding Paradise,” a documentary detailing the 2018 Camp Fire and the recovery process that followed. The movie – distributed by National Geographic Documentary Films – will be available to stream beginning Friday, July 31.

“I followed the Carr Fire in Redding,” Howard said during a phone interview this week. “I have a lot of relatives up there, and then the Camp Fire hit Paradise. That’s a place I’ve been also. … Like many things, once you relate to the horrific images you’re seeing, it just resonates more deeply and it really stirred my curiosity.”

“Rebuilding Paradise” spends significant time detailing the events of Nov. 8, when the Camp Fire swept through Paradise, destroying much of the town and becoming the most destructive wildfire in California history, but Howard said

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More than 1,000 aspiring surgeons couldn’t take a critical online exam after the system failed. Now they’re left worried it may never happen.

surgeon
surgeon

HRAUN/Getty Images

  • An exam taken by surgeons in the US saw its online system fail Thursday, leaving more than 1,000 aspiring surgeons in the dark on when — or if — they will take the test.

  • The test is a critical and costly part of transitioning from medical resident to a board-certified surgeon. 

  • The American Board of Surgery runs the tests and used a virtual proctor company called Proctortrack to give the test. 

  • Four aspiring surgeons told Business Insider they were frustrated with the lack of transparency and incompetence from the organization. The unknown delay could make it difficult for them to take the exam later, which requires weeks of intense studying beforehand.

  • “I have to start working,” one said. “I don’t have the financial security to sit back for a month and not be paid.”

  • For more stories like this, sign up here for our healthcare newsletter, Dispensed.

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More than 1,000 aspiring surgeons couldn’t take a critical online exam after the system failed. Now, they’re left worried if it’ll ever happen.

surgeon
surgeon

HRAUN/Getty Images

  • An exam taken by surgeons in the US saw its online system fail Thursday, leaving more than 1,000 aspiring surgeons in the dark on when — or if — they will take the test.

  • The test is a critical and costly part of transitioning from medical resident to a board-certified surgeon. 

  • The American Board of Surgery runs the tests and used a virtual proctor company called Proctortrack to give the test. 

  • Four aspiring surgeons, speaking anonymously to Business Insider, said they are frustrated with the lack of transparency and incompetence from the organization. The unknown delay could make it difficult for them to take the exam later, which requires weeks of intense studying beforehand.

  • “I have to start working,” one said. “I don’t have the financial security to sit back for a month and not be paid.”

  • For more stories like this, sign up here for our

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