Market

Real Estate Agents Reveal Their Secrets To Get Your Home Off the Market Fast

If you’re selling your home, you probably want to get it off the market ASAP. A quick sale will prevent you from having to possibly maintain and pay for two properties at once, and it also means you’ll probably get a better price for your home. Homes that don’t sell quickly tend to sell for less than asking price.

GOBankingRates spoke to real estate agents and other experts to find out their secrets for how to sell your house fast.

Last updated: March 2, 2020

Price It Right

If you want to get a house sold fast, the best way to do it is to price it right from the start,” said Corey Chappell, a closing options analyst with 181-Close-Now. “The majority of agents go for the easy deal. That means every morning they look to see which houses just hit the market and look like good deals. If

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The global sneaker resale market could reach $30 billion by 2030

A little over a year has passed since Cowen Equity Research classified sneakers as an emerging alternative asset class. Since then, sneakers have not only emerged, but the market itself shows no signs of slowing. Cowen analysts believe that the sneaker resale market could potentially reach $30 billion by 2030.

“With a growing base of passionate investors, a growing source of supply and authentication, sneakers: 1) earns illiquidity premiums; 2) provides diversification – non-correlated with traditional asset classes; and 3) earns favorable risk-reward characteristics,” the analysts wrote in a research note.

In 2019, Cowen estimated that the total global sneaker market stood at $100 billion. The U.S. primary sneakers market — or the market for new sneakers — was worth more than $21 billion. The global and U.S. resale market stood at $6 and $2 billion, respectively.

John Kernan, an analyst at Cowen, tells Yahoo Finance that the sneaker resale

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‘Bank’ offering 6% called Loan Doctor sued for allegedly trading ‘insured’ deposits in stock market

Last November, a company called Loan Doctor Financial launched an online CD account called a “Healthcare Finance Savings CD Account” that claimed to pay interest rates of 6%. With the deposits, the company, which the CFPB says called itself a “commercial bank,” would purportedly make loans to medical professionals, which it said represented a low credit risk. The company denies that it called itself a “commercial bank.”

With the very best rates of the online banks (Marcus, Ally, Synchrony) paying around 2% APY, the numbers stuck out because they were pitched as an almost risk-free investment with returns rivaling the stock market’s.

But this week, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau filed suit against the company and its CEO Dr. Edgar Radjabli for “deceptive acts and practices in marketing a savings CD account.”

Among the practices the CFPB alleges: taking money from people who thought it was going to insured cash-equivalent

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Money Market Funds vs. Money Market Accounts

When deciding where to save and invest, your choices will depend on your goals, time frame for saving and risk tolerance. A money market fund is one option; a money market account is another. While they sound similar, they actually work very differently when it comes to growing your money over time. Further, only one of these is insured against loss by the FDIC. Understanding the differences between a money market account and a money market fund can help you decide which one to include in your saving and investing plans.

Money Market Fund, Definition

A money market fund is an investment vehicle, rather than a deposit account. You can invest in money market funds through an online brokerage, either inside a tax-advantaged savings account like an IRA or through a taxable brokerage account.

A money market fund is essentially a type of mutual fund that holds other securities, such

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Virus Spurs Emerging Market Investors to Seek Returns in ESG

(Bloomberg) — Emerging-market investors may have identified the rare animal that offers a path to sustainable post-pandemic returns. Now they just need to find it.

The worst crisis since World War II is prompting some fund managers to rethink their strategies in a world with $13 trillion of sub-zero yielding debt and an increasing view that a V-shaped recovery is unlikely. Seeking opportunities in ESG, investments in countries and companies that are improving environmental, social and governance standards, are becoming crucial more than ever as investors navigate the pandemic-stoked market volatility.

“This is a crisis unlike anything we’ve seen and we cannot just go back to our old textbooks anymore that say ‘go buy the dip’,” said Thu Ha Chow, a money manager at Loomis Sayles Investment Asia Pte, who has been investing since Enron’s collapse. “The social and governance elements are going to be more important, but they can

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What are Hongkongers going to do with their HK$10,000 payout? Bet on the stock market, from the looks of it

Starting this week, each permanent resident of Hong Kong will be eligible to receive HK$10,000 (US$1,290) in a one-time cash payout, part of the government’s HK$55 billion financial stimulus to help the city survive its worst recession on record.

Hong Kong’s Financial Secretary Paul Chan Mo-po, the architect of the financial disbursement, would prefer the city’s residents to spend that money dining out, shopping, travel locally or pay for their utility bills. Chances are that Hongkongers will redirect that money towards the stock market, where they can put it to better use in one of Asia’s cheapest bourses, and to subscribe for two dozen initial public offerings (IPOs) in the pipeline.

“I will use it to invest in the stock market at the right time,” said Irene Chan, a white-collar professional working in the Central business district. “HK$10,000 is not a large sum of money. My aim is to double

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2020 graduates face uncertain job market with hope

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – If everything had gone according to plan, Missy Wood thought she’d have a job helping at-risk youths by now. 

Wood, a recent graduate of Middle Tennessee State University, saw her internship with Court-Appointed Special Advocates end abruptly in March as the COVID-19 pandemic took root in Tennessee. She started applying for jobs with the Department of Children’s Services and similar organizations in April.

By the time she graduated in May, new job postings for her chosen career had all but disappeared.

Wood is one of the thousands of graduates across the nation who face a turbulent job market amid the novel coronavirus pandemic. More than 47 million Americans have filed jobless benefit claims since the middle of March, according to the Labor Department.  

Eli Kellum, 7, climbs on the back of babysitter Missy Wood in the Kellum family's backyard in Murfreesboro on June 18, 2020, as the two play on the trampoline. Wood has been looking for work since April but has not been able to find any child-focused social work positions since graduating from MTSU in May. After the pandemic hit, job postings for her planned career seemed to disappear.
Eli Kellum, 7, climbs on the back of babysitter Missy Wood in the Kellum family’s backyard in Murfreesboro on June 18, 2020, as the
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If you don’t get more stimulus checks this summer from Uncle Sam, here’s how the stock market may react

With cities across major states such as California, Florida and Texas returning to some form of lockdown due to spiking COVID-19 cases after brief full re-openings, it’s becoming clear the U.S. economy will likely need a fresh jolt of stimulus from lawmakers.

If that stimulus isn’t received this summer the stock market — which has been blindly rallying despite growing risks of a renewed dive in economic activity because of COVID-19 —could easily fall off a cliff.

“It will be a hit, no question,” warned Belpointe Asset Management chief strategist David Nelson on Yahoo Finance’s The First Trade of the risk to stocks if more stimulus isn’t enacted. Other pros Yahoo Finance has chatted up estimate the stock market could plunge nearly 20% if lawmakers don’t enact additional stimulus.

Under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act, individuals were eligible for up to $1,200 (depending on income level)

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As Big Deals Make the Rounds at the Cannes Market, a Pandemic Era of Dealmaking Takes Shape

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When this year’s Cannes market migrated online, some worried that it might have a negative impact on the business. As it turns out, it’s a lot easier to close international pre-sales when jumping from meeting to meeting means logging into various Zoom rooms, rather than squeezing through throngs of people on the Croisette. Agents and buyers say that while nothing can compare to in-person meetings at Cannes, this week’s virtual markets were productive and offered a blueprint for pandemic-era dealmaking.

In fact, if the Cannes markets are any indication, buyers are hungry for big deals, despite the uncertainty that surrounds whether audiences are comfortable returning to theaters.

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While the the country’s three largest circuits all plan to reopen all their locations in July, Warner Bros. this week pushed back for a second time the summer’s highest-profile film, Christopher Nolan’s “Tenet,”

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Cannes Delivers Big Titles, Sales & Hope but Questions Market Models

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“The Blacksmith,” “Ferrari,” “Armageddon Time” and “The Card Counter” look like market highlights of an extraordinary Cannes market, which saw its two virtual platforms delivering for a select number of big U.S. projects, amid large market caution and even fear of a second COVID-19 spike.

In the art film sector, Cannes Official Selection label titles made much of the running, with distributors lamenting that they would have loved to have seen more screened at Cannes. “Without the festival, the market was weak in terms of arthouse, because we lacked the buzz, hype and the experience of being all together in a screening room,” said Stefano Massenzi, head of acquisitions and business affairs at Italy’s distribution banner Lucky Red.

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Equally, more mainstream distributors looked for greater depth in the pre-sales market. Most everyone, however, was delighted and some even surprised that

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