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Black, Hispanic and American Indian Children Make Up 78 Percent of All Youth Coronavirus Deaths

Black, Hispanic and American Indian children are dying due to COVID-19 at a disproportionally higher rate than their white peers, a new Centers for Disease Control study found.

While children are significantly less likely than adults to die from COVID-19, minority youth represent 78 percent of current fatalities.

For this study, the CDC tracked all known pediatric COVID-19 cases and deaths in the U.S. for the first time and found that between February and July, there have been at least 391,814 cases and 121 deaths in people under 21 years old.

Of those 121 deaths, Black, Hispanic and American Indian children accounted for over three-quarters, despite making up just 41 percent of the U.S. population under 21. Hispanic children had the highest rate of death, at 44 percent, followed by Black children at 29 percent and 4 percent for both American Indian and Asian or Pacific Islander children. White children

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Hillsborough’s Positive Rate For Coronavirus Reaches 15 Percent

TAMPA, FL — With positive coronavirus cases continuing to rise in Hillsborough County, the county’s Emergency Policy Group voted to extend the mandatory face mask order for another seven days during its meeting on Monday.

According to Hillsborough County Emergency Management Director Tim Dudley, the rolling 14-day average of cases is 670, an increase of 5.9. The positivity rate based on daily test results is 15 percent.

John Hopkins University of Medicine has issued guidelines recommending that states reach positivity rates of 10 percent or below before they can be removed as “red zone” states.

A document prepared for the White House Coronavirus Task Force said those states in the red zone should maintain stringent protective measures, limit social gatherings to 10 people or fewer, close bars and gyms and ask residents to wear masks at all times.

Currently, there are 11 states in the red zone including Florida, Georgia,

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West Elm Takes the 15 Percent Pledge to Support Black-Owned Businesses

Photo credit: West Elm
Photo credit: West Elm

From ELLE Decor

As the #blacklivesmatter hashtag slowly stops trending online, how are large corporations going to continue to use their power to make an impact toward economic equality for Black businesses in their respective industries? Aurora James—the founder of Brother Vellies, a luxury accessories brand—came up with the 15 Percent Pledge as a response to the many people and businesses alike who have asked the question, What can we do to help?

The name of the project is derived from the fact that Black Americans make up nearly 15 percent of the U.S. population; the pledge began to go viral after James proposed the idea on her personal Instagram account and directly tagged major retailers such as Target, Sephora, and Whole Foods. When companies sign on to take the pledge, they are promising that at least 15 percent of their shelf space will be devoted

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