Social

I’m a 19-year-old TikTok influencer. Here’s how I turned social media into a job

Parker James, 19, is a social media creator based in Dallas, Texas, who has made a name for himself on TikTok through his family-friendly comedic character “StEvEn.” His character is the endearing and curious CEO of the Dino Club, a fictitious club he created for dinosaur lovers. Below James shares in his own words how he went from being an average high schooler to a TikTok powerhouse with over 6 million followers, a talent agent and making a living from creating videos.

I’ve always enjoyed making others happy.

When I was younger, I started making funny videos in hopes of making my friends and family laugh. Their reactions always made me so proud and motivated me to continue to come up with new jokes and skits.

However, as I grew older I got more into sports than my previous comedy passions. Unfortunately, while trying out a new trick on my

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30% of British sportswomen say they have been trolled on social media, survey finds

Susannah Townsend, English international field hockey player: Photo by Mark Kolbe/Getty Images
Susannah Townsend, English international field hockey player: Photo by Mark Kolbe/Getty Images

Almost a third of female British athletes have said they have experienced trolling on social media, with some describing the abuse they have encountered as “threatening” and “scary”.

BBC Sport recently conducted a survey of 537 British sportswomen representing 39 sports to ascertain the different experiences of female athletes.

The survey questioned the participants on topics including how much money they earn, whether they believe the media does enough to promote women‘s sport and if they are supported to the same extent as male athletes.

They were also asked about their experiences on social media, with 30 per cent saying they have been trolled online.

This marked a significant increase from 2015, when 14 per cent of respondents said they had been trolled on social media.

Several athletes – including Wales rugby union international player Elilnor Snowsill, Olympic

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How to make video meetings more like in-person experience? Add social hours, games, trivia and fun

Camille Schmidt was recently asked at a meeting to share something about her that no one at the company knew. As opposed to the previous meeting, when she needed to announce a hidden talent her co-workers weren’t aware of.

If it sounds like getting-to-know-you day at school, it should. The intent among leaders at Philo, a TV streaming company, is to humanize the dry video meeting and make them come to life.

Meetings “will never be the same as in person, but this way continues to make us a cohesive group,” says Schmidt, a communications manager for Philo. “It’s the social hours that really connect us as a company. We have 10 new hires that have come aboard since the pandemic. And I feel like I know them, even though I’ve never met any of them in person.”

Tyler Haak, an account executive with Schneider Electric on a video meeting
Tyler Haak, an account executive with Schneider Electric on a video meeting
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Is Social Distancing Actually Bringing Us Closer To Our Friends?

Friendship, when orchestrated through the blue-lit lens of a Zoom window, can seem a less-than-thrilling exchange. Socializing online and in the flesh are certainly not interchangeable. But, as we combat a global pandemic, rally against police brutality, and confront systemic racism in our communities (among other things), we’ve arguably never needed our support systems more.

It follows that, over the course of the last few months, many of us have adjusted our approaches to friendship to fit the present tense. We’re unlearning physical togetherness as a coping mechanism, and instead, finding ways to make our presence known remotely. We’re doing away with our stock guidelines detailing what friendship should look like, and instead, personalizing our own genres of closeness. And the truth of the matter is, many of us would do well to maintain these new habits long after dive bars and bistros reopen their doors.

So, in the parlance

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online workshops, writing books, and more social media

Four years ago, I realised that my interest in writing about varied subjects could be fulfilled only by being a freelancer. Since then, I have been writing regularly for various publications on subjects ranging from elections to features on travel and cinema. But just as I was settling into a comfortable rhythm and the opportunities seem to be multiplying, the Covid-19 virus brought the world to a standstill.

Suddenly, I was staring at many months of no assignments. A column I had started at the beginning of the year was put on hold and a publication I frequently contributed to, put a pause to freelance contributions.

Romantic notions

Freelancers are looked upon as the lucky few who have managed to break the clutches of bonded employment by working on their own terms. Interestingly, in most of the professional fields/domains today, freelancers are known to have strong bargaining power for their

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Turkey tightens grip on social media with new law

Istanbul (AFP) – Turkey’s parliament on Wednesday passed a controversial bill giving the government greater control of social media, a move criticised by human rights advocates as an attempt to increase online censorship.

Under the new law, social media giants such as Facebook and Twitter have to ensure that they have local representatives in Turkey and to comply with court orders over the removal of certain content or face heavy fines.

The legislation targets social networks with more than a million unique visits every day and says servers with Turkish users’ data on them must be sited locally.

If companies refuse to comply, they will face fines and restrictions making the platform unusable.

The bill was submitted by the ruling AKP and its nationalist partner the MHP, which have a majority in parliament, and passed after a night-long marathon.

Twitter, contacted by AFP, did not make an immediate comment.

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Misleading viral coronavirus video shows flaw in social media platforms

A video that made false claims about the coronavirus received tens of millions of views and amplification from President Donald Trump when it went viral on Monday — until Facebook and Twitter removed it from their platforms.

The incident illustrates a flaw in how social media companies police misinformation, tech mogul and philanthropist Bill Gates told Yahoo Finance Editor-in-Chief Andy Serwer on Tuesday.

Gates, a top backer of global public health initiatives and co-founder of Microsoft (MSFT), said that the spread of the “outrageous” video illustrates the way social media platforms struggle to contain damaging misinformation on social media platforms before it gains wide attention, adding that they “probably should have improved” how they monitor such posts to prevent outcomes like the one that occurred on Monday.

The video “spread so fast that even though, eventually, the social media people stopped it,” he says. “It was so famous that now

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Egypt female social media influencers get two-year jail terms

Cairo (AFP) – An Egyptian court Monday sentenced five female social media influencers to two years in jail each on charges of violating public morals, a judicial source said.

The verdict against Haneen Hossam, Mowada al-Adham and three others came after they had posted footage on video-sharing app TikTok.

“The Cairo economic court sentenced Hossam, Adham and three others to two years after they were convicted of violating society’s values,” the judicial source said.

The ruling, which can be appealed, included a fine of 300,000 Egyptian pounds ($18,750) for each defendant, the source noted.

Hossam was arrested in April after posting a three-minute clip telling her 1.3 million followers that girls could make money by working with her.

In May, authorities arrested Adham who had posted satirical videos on TikTok and Instagram, where she has at least two million followers.

Lawyer Ahmed Hamza al-Bahqiry said the young women are facing

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Egypt female social media influencers get 2-year jail terms

Cairo (AFP) – An Egyptian court Monday sentenced five female social media influencers to two years in jail on charges of violating public morals, a judicial source said.

The verdict against Haneen Hossam, Mowada al-Adham and three others came after they posted footage on video-sharing app TikTok.

“The Cairo economic court sentenced Hossam, Adham and three others to two years after they were convicted of violating society values,” the source said.

The ruling — which can be appealed — included a fine of 300,000 Egyptian pounds ($18,750) each, the source added.

Hossam was arrested in April after posting a three-minute clip telling her 1.3 million followers that girls could make money by working with her.

In May, authorities arrested Adham who had posted satirical videos on TikTok and Instagram, where she has at least two million followers.

The arrests highlighted a social divide in the deeply conservative Muslim country over

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Business groups call for action on fraudulent social media ads

Some fake adverts receive 250,000 views before they are identified as selling counterfeit goods, says new report. Photo: Getty
Some fake adverts receive 250,000 views before they are identified as selling counterfeit goods, says new report. Photo: Getty

Business groups are calling on social media platforms to tackle fake adverts selling counterfeit goods.

Some 70 major brands have been targeted by false ads on Facebook (FB), Instagram, YouTube and Google (GOOG) according to a report by the Transnational Alliance to Combat Illicit Trade (TRACIT) and the American Apparel and Footwear Association (AAFA).

The fake adverts can receive up to 250,000 views before they are detected says the report.

 “It’s alarming that people are exposed to fraudulent advertisements for counterfeits while they’re thumbing through their social media accounts,” said TRACIT director general Jeffrey Hardy.

“The ads are so professional that they easily deceive consumers into thinking they’re getting a great deal. Instead, they’re being diverted to a rogue website that was built specifically to sell and distribute counterfeits.”

The report

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