struggle

Work-life balance in age of coronavirus a struggle for some, survey finds

Achieving work-life balance in the age of coronavirus is proving difficult for college students and graduates just starting out in the professional world, one survey found, with many citing mental health services as an important benefit they would like to see offered by future employers. 

Even though students and recent graduates have adequately adjusted to remote work, the major concerns with making this shift are feelings of isolation and a lack of work-life balance, according to a new study conducted by Propeller Insight on behalf of Handshake. In the online survey, more than half of 1,003 students aged 17 to 24 who responded said they feel it’s important or very important that their future employer provides mental health benefits. 

CORONAVIRUS DISRUPTING MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES IN MOST COUNTRIES: WHO

“While students are able to certainly adapt to virtual, one of the things that they really want to make sure employers are

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Brentwood’s Diesel bookstore launches a GoFundMe as more stores struggle through pandemic

Diesel bookseller Lynn Aime makes a sale next to a sign asking customers to contribute to the shop's GoFundMe. <span class="copyright">(Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)</span>
Diesel bookseller Lynn Aime makes a sale next to a sign asking customers to contribute to the shop’s GoFundMe. (Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)

Next to a bottle of hand sanitizer, on a table at an entrance to Brentwood’s Diesel bookstore, is a message to customers describing an existential crisis induced by a pandemic. It says, in essence: We need your help.

“We have tried to weather this storm, with creative reinvention, hard work, and perseverance, as we always have,” reads the note from Diesel owners Alison Reid and John Evans. “We’ve managed to keep our booksellers afloat financially and with the necessary health care. But at this point, our stores are foundering.

“… So we are asking for your support to restore us to a sustainable level, to make it through this taxing time… We have resisted this appeal to our wider community, but now we are running

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Small businesses in college towns struggle without students

pandemic sent his best customers — University of Michigan students — back home in mid-March.” data-reactid=”32″ANN ARBOR, Mich. (AP) — Perry Porikos sat in the street outside one of his five businesses, in a makeshift patio area that didn’t exist before the COVID-19 pandemic sent his best customers — University of Michigan students — back home in mid-March.

The Greek immigrant arrived here more than four decades ago as a 20-year-old soccer player for the Wolverines and part-time dishwasher at The Brown Jug Restaurant, which he now owns. He nonchalantly dropped names of sports stars like Tom Brady and Michael Phelps, two of the many former Michigan students he counts as friends, and recalled hustling enough to own more than 10 businesses at one time.

“Living the dream that people talk about, especially if you live in Europe and you come here,” Porikos said, “I am the dream.”

Lately,

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the struggle between money and memory

<span class=Decaying monument to the ‘people’s uprising against fascism’ at Petrova Gora in Croatia. Ilija Ascic via Shutterstock” src=”https://s.yimg.com/ny/api/res/1.2/YT4hygCGA.EzmFGz9YHM6Q–/YXBwaWQ9aGlnaGxhbmRlcjt3PTcwNTtoPTQ2OS4wNTI0MTkzNTQ4Mzg3/https://s.yimg.com/uu/api/res/1.2/vIVb9uvHyG4pBL00cCQ0.g–~B/aD0zMzA7dz00OTY7c209MTthcHBpZD15dGFjaHlvbg–/https://media.zenfs.com/en/the_conversation_464/415f894b3473c7d8e1302e2da9f7d4e5″ data-src=”https://s.yimg.com/ny/api/res/1.2/YT4hygCGA.EzmFGz9YHM6Q–/YXBwaWQ9aGlnaGxhbmRlcjt3PTcwNTtoPTQ2OS4wNTI0MTkzNTQ4Mzg3/https://s.yimg.com/uu/api/res/1.2/vIVb9uvHyG4pBL00cCQ0.g–~B/aD0zMzA7dz00OTY7c209MTthcHBpZD15dGFjaHlvbg–/https://media.zenfs.com/en/the_conversation_464/415f894b3473c7d8e1302e2da9f7d4e5″/
Decaying monument to the ‘people’s uprising against fascism’ at Petrova Gora in Croatia. Ilija Ascic via Shutterstock

Many tourists – especially people who come from western democracies – are fascinated with the communist pasts of central and eastern European countries. Their desire to gaze upon, consume and experience the remnants of life behind the Iron Curtain contrasts with the desire of many local people to distance and forget their traumatic pasts.

As a result, many of the places associated with the communist regimes have been long abandoned and even destroyed. Meanwhile the horrors of 20th-century history are commemorated by Black Ribbon Day on August 23 – officially known as the European Day of Remembrance for Victims of Stalinism and Nazism.

In many eastern European countries such as Bulgaria, Romania, Hungary,

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Young people struggle with finding mental health support amid COVID-19 pandemic

Kathryn Boit feels “guilty for struggling so much” these past few months. 

As president of the Harvard Student Mental Health Liaisons, she has “college friends, acquaintances and strangers reach out to me for resources and advice,” she said. “I don’t know the answers anymore.”

It’s no wonder Boit, a Harvard sophomore, feels overwhelmed. Prevalence of depression among college students increased since the pandemic closed campuses this spring compared with fall 2019, according to a survey of 18,000 college students published by the Healthy Minds Network on July 9. And of the nearly 42% of students who sought mental health care during the pandemic, 60% said it was either much more or somewhat more difficult to access care.

Mental health among young people has been worsening for years. A 2019 analysis of teens reported 13% of U.S. teens ages 12 to 17 (or 3.2 million) said in 2017 that they had

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Young people struggle with finding mental health support amid COVID pandemic

Kathryn Boit feels “guilty for struggling so much” these past few months. 

As the president of the Harvard Student Mental Health Liaisons, she has “college friends, acquaintances, and strangers reach out to me for resources and advice,” she said. “I don’t know the answers anymore.”

It’s no wonder Boit, a Harvard sophomore, feels overwhelmed. Prevalence of depression among college students increased since the pandemic caused the closure of campuses this spring compared to fall 2019, according to a survey of 18,000 college students published by the Healthy Minds Network on July 9. And of the nearly 42% of students who sought mental health care during the pandemic, 60% said it was either much more or somewhat more difficult to access care.

Mental health among young people has been worsening for years. A 2019 analysis of teens reported 13% of U.S. teens ages 12 to 17 (or 3.2 million) said in

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University of Maryland students struggle to cancel housing leases

When South Campus Commons at the University of Maryland, College Park, canceled its apartment leases in March, Julia Kane called it “the right thing to do” during the pandemic.

By June, the university also gave students the option to cancel their fall housing agreements without penalty. But then South Campus Commons and The Courtyards, the public-private apartments owned by the Maryland Economic Development Corporation, told students they were legally bound to their leases.

Capstone On-Campus Management, the entity hired to manage the apartments, told 3,000 students with leases their only options were to re-lease to another student, to pay and live on-campus, or to pay and live at home, Kane said. Kane, a senior studying marketing and operations management and business analytics, managed to cancel her lease cost-free, but it only happened after days of pressure from her father, who is an attorney.

“When I signed this lease back in

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Day cares welcome mask-wearing toddlers as parents struggle to ‘make best decision’ in COVID-19 world

Sam DeRoze is almost 4 years old. After years of nanny care, he’s supposed to dive into his first organized school experience this fall. But the coronavirus pandemic has his mother mulling.

“I’ll need to see the plan from his preschool before I decide,” says Dianne DeRoze, a business consultant in Leesburg, Virginia. “If it’s safe and a positive experience, that’s valuable. What I don’t want is for him to have a knee-jerk reaction that school is this scary place you get dumped.”

DeRoze is among the millions of parents grappling with sending their children to preschool and babies to day care as cases of COVID-19, the disease caused by the virus, spike nationally.

The debate continues to rage among politicians and school officials on fall reopening plans. New York Mayor Bill de Blasio announced last week that the city would be providing day care for 100,000 children to help

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Daycares welcome mask-wearing toddlers as parents struggle to ‘make best decision’ in COVID-19 world

Sam DeRoze is almost 4 years old. After years of nanny care, he’s supposed to dive into his first organized school experience this fall. But the coronavirus pandemic has his mother mulling.

“I’ll need to see the plan from his pre-school before I decide,” says Dianne DeRoze, a business consultant in Leesburg, Virginia. “If it’s safe and a positive experience, that’s valuable. What I don’t want is for him to have a knee-jerk reaction that school is this scary place you get dumped.”

DeRoze is among millions of parents grappling with the pros and cons of sending their children to preschool and babies to day care as cases of COVID-19, the disease caused by the virus, spike nationally.

The debate continues to rage between politicians and school officials on fall re-opening plans, while New York Mayor Bill de Blasio announced last week that the city would be providing day care

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Small businesses around the world struggle to survive

Hour after hour in the dark, Chander Shekhar’s mind raced ahead to morning.

More than three months had dragged by since the coronavirus forced him to shut down his business — a shop racked with vibrantly colored saris, on a block in New York’s Jackson Heights neighborhood once thronged with South Asian immigrant shoppers. Today, finally, merchants were allowed to reopen their doors.

But they were returning to an area where COVID-19 had killed hundreds, leaving sidewalks desolate and storefronts to gather dust. Overnight, the uncertainties of reopening had woken Shekhar nine times.

“This is an invisible enemy that nobody can see,” said Shekhar, who is anxious about the $6,000 monthly rent at his store, Shopno Fashion. “I have worked hard for this for more than 20 years, then I got my shop. It’s not easy to leave it.”

The pandemic’s toll leaves Shekhar reluctant to complain, and he knows

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