tech

Printers are selling out! 5 in-stock options you can get covered under Yahoo Plus Tech

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Socks, bed desks and Zoom video conference software aren’t the only products that have skyrocketed in sales since quarantine in the United States began. Directly connected to the major rise in work from home rates, printer sales have also significantly increased with folks (myself included) struggling to find reasonable price options that are still in stock and available for delivery.

According to Bloomberg, the influx of printer sales initially came as a result of consumers needing

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These tech trends defined 2020 so far, according to 5 founders

2020 has been quite a year. Almost every industry and aspect of how we work, learn, and communicate was turned upside down. The need for fast tech solutions has brought about new trends and changes on a scale we’ve never seen before.

It’s agile, fast-moving tech startups that have been leading the way by developing new solutions and features to help us adjust to this new reality. But, as different parts of the world begin opening up again, which trends will stick? How will these experiences change and shape our lives for the better?

This year Techleap.nl kicked off its Rise program for up-and-coming Dutch scaleups, with the aim to help them continue maturing into the country’s next success stories.

We caught up with five entrepreneurs from the program’s first batch of cohorts to find out what new trends emerged in their industry and how they’ve used tech to navigate

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Tech leaders have long predicted a ‘splinternet’ future where the web is divided between the US and China. Trump might make it a reality.

President Donald Trump attends a bilateral meeting with China's President Xi Jinping during the G20 leaders summit in Osaka, Japan, June 29, 2019.
President Donald Trump attends a bilateral meeting with China’s President Xi Jinping during the G20 leaders summit in Osaka, Japan, June 29, 2019.

Kevin Lamarque/Reuters

  • The Trump administration announced a broad plan on Wednesday to block Chinese software from being used on US devices and keep US data off Chinese cloud services.

  • The plan mirrors China’s “great firewall” that prevents people in China from accessing most US websites and apps.

  • While the Trump administration’s announcement rocked the world of tech, Silicon Valley leaders have long braced for a “splinternet” that could replace the world wide web with locally contained networks.

  • Others, like former Google CEO Eric Schmidt, have previously predicted a bifurcated internet, split between China’s internet and the rest of the world.

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

We’re closer to a “splinternet” than ever before.

Tech leaders have long warned that the world wide web could come

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Avoid the top 7 tech mistakes most small businesses make

There was a time when small-business people did not have to be geeky or tech savvy.

How quaint.

Especially now, in this COVID-19 world, it is vital that anyone owning, running or working in a small business be as smart about technology as they are about business.

That is sometimes easier said than done.

Here are the most common tech mistakes that small businesses make, and how to avoid them.

1. Looking small

Of all the great things the internet has brought to small business – and the ability to sell anywhere, anytime is just for starters – maybe best of all is that there is no need to ever look small again. You may be small offline, but online, you can look every bit as big as your biggest competitor. If your website and social presence aren’t top notch, you are leaving money on the table.

2. Lack of

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Stocks post fourth straight monthly gain as tech shares surge

Stocks ended higher on Friday, with the Nasdaq outperforming after a slew of better than expected corporate earnings results from major tech firms. Facebook and Apple posted record closing highs.

Friday’s session marked the last of July, with each of the three major indices closing out a fourth straight month of gains. The S&P 500 rose about 5%, the Dow increased 2% and the Nasdaq outperformed, rising more than 6.5% on the month.

Tech titans Facebook (FB), Amazon (AMZN), Apple (AAPL), and Alphabet (GOOG, GOOGL), each reported quarterly results that blew past estimates Thursday evening, affirming these companies’ pandemic-era dominance following a steep run-up in tech stocks over the past couple months.

Facebook grew its revenue 11% over last year as its advertising business remained resilient despite the pandemic-related slowdown across the broader ad industry. Alphabet’s ad business was hit more prominently by that trend, with Google ad revenue falling

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Stock futures rise after Big Tech reports blowout earnings

Stock futures extended gains Friday morning, with contracts on the Nasdaq jumping more than 100 points, or 1%, after a slew of better than expected corporate earnings results from major tech firms.

After market close, tech titans Facebook (FB), Amazon (AMZN), Apple (AAPL), and Alphabet (GOOG, GOOGL), each reported quarterly results that blew past estimates, affirming these companies’ pandemic-era dominance following a steep run-up in tech stocks over the past couple months.

Facebook grew its revenue 11% over last year as its advertising business remained resilient despite the pandemic-related slowdown across the broader ad industry. Alphabet’s ad business was hit more prominently by that trend, with Google ad revenue falling 8% over last year, though Alphabet’s overall top- and bottom-line results still topped estimates. Facebook’s daily active users jumped 13% to 1.79 billion and monthly active users rose 12% to 2.7% billion as the pandemic drove online engagement, though the

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Stock futures jump after Big Tech reports blowout earnings

Stock futures rose Thursday evening, with contracts on the Nasdaq jumping more than 100 points, or 1%, after a slew of better than expected corporate earnings results from major tech firms.

After market close, tech titans Facebook (FB), Amazon (AMZN), Apple (AAPL), and Alphabet (GOOG, GOOGL), each reported quarterly results that blew past estimates, affirming these companies’ pandemic-era dominance following a steep run-up in tech stocks over the past couple months.

Facebook grew its revenue 11% over last year as its advertising business remained resilient despite the pandemic-related slowdown across the broader ad industry. Alphabet’s ad business was hit more prominently by that trend, with Google ad revenue falling 8% over last year, though Alphabet’s overall top- and bottom-line results still topped estimates. Facebook’s daily active users jumped 13% to 1.79 billion and monthly active users rose 12% to 2.7% billion as the pandemic drove online engagement, though the company

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After Big Tech hearing, these changes could become priorities for Washington

The landmark Congressional hearing of tech CEOs on Wednesday was long on political theater, but sprinkled among the 5 hours of questioning were some solid indications of what changes lawmakers could seek for technology companies.

With the CEOs of Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google before him, Rep. David Cicilline (D-RI) announced that the next step for his investigation will be a report to “propose solutions to the problems before us.” In an interview with Yahoo News last week, Cicilline, who has endorsed Joe Biden, said he hopes the report will be a “blueprint for the next administration.”

The question is what measures might actually be a priority in 2021 in either a Biden or Trump administration. President Trump has been outspoken on some issues – especially political speech – and former Vice President Joe Biden and his allies have indicated that some of these big tech issues would be part

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Tech CEOs go on defense

Four of the nation’s most powerful CEOs beamed into a Capitol Hill hearing Wednesday and raised their hands to swear to tell the truth as they faced a barrage of questions on one major issue: Are their companies too big and powerful for America’s good?

Lawmakers hammered Google Sundar Pichai about his company’s relations with China and whether it steals ideas from other businesses, Facebook chief executive Mark Zuckerberg about a blizzard of disinformation plaguing his social network, and Apple CEO Tim Cook on whether his iPhone-maker strong-arms developers on its App Store.

Perhaps surprisingly, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos — making his long-awaited first-ever appearance before a congressional hearing — had faced no question nearly two hours into the session.

The virtual testimony, in a hearing of the House Judiciary Committee’s antitrust subcommittee, comes at a time of rising legal jeopardy for the major tech companies, who are the subject

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Biased Big Tech algorithms limit our lives and choices. Stop the online discrimination.

The leaders of Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google have some serious explaining to do about bias and discrimination when they appear Wednesday at an antitrust hearing before the House Judiciary Committee. 

The abuse of trust by the platform-based companies we rely on most has largely flown under the radar as a global pandemic heightens and highlights fissures in our society. But our data and our choices continue to be manipulated in problematic ways — often by algorithms that subtly introduce bias into the prices we pay and the information and options made available to us. It is essential that we hold our digital gatekeepers accountable. 

The algorithms at issue have a veritable fire hose of our data at their disposal, and they aren’t the neutral equations we might assume them to be. They are the product of humans, and because of that they have a tendency to perpetuate human biases.

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