Trump

Cash-strapped Trump campaign awaits a bailout from big donors

Republican Party megadonors are racing to bail out President Donald Trump’s cash-strapped reelection campaign, with a newly formed super PAC pouring a further$25 million into battleground states.

Preserve America is set to begin running a trio of TV commercials savaging Democrat Joe Biden as Republicans express growing alarm over the president’s absence from the airwaves. Trump — who went dark for part of August and has since cancelled advertising in key states — is being outspent more than 2-to-1 by Biden this week, according to the media tracking firm Advertising Analytics.

The outside group, which is expected to draw funding from prolific GOP givers including Las Vegas casino mogul Sheldon Adelson and Home Depot co-founder Bernie Marcus, is rushing to fill the void. Starting late this week, the super PAC will begin airing ads in seven states, including some where Trump is being badly outspent.

With Trump’s once-formidable cash advantage

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Nike never said it ‘can afford’ to lose the business of Trump supporters

The claim: Nike stated the company can afford to lose customers who support Trump

Misinformation about the political stances of major corporations — like Pepsi and Wendy’s — has spread online this summer, along with calls to boycott the companies.

Recent posts on Facebook have focused on athletic apparel giant Nike.

Users claim that the company stated that it “can afford” to lose the business of customers who support President Donald Trump.

“NIKE has stated, ‘We’re a $76 Billion dollar company that can afford to let go of all ‘Make America Great Again’ customers,” one post reads, accompanied by the hashtag #bye.

The user behind the post did not respond to request from USA TODAY for comment.

Fact check: There’s no evidence Donald Trump helped with 9/11 response

Statement is not from Nike

Though Nike has voiced support for Black Lives Matter, it has not endorsed a presidential candidate or

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Big GOP donors rush to rescue Trump

Republican Party megadonors are racing to bail out President Donald Trump’s cash-strapped reelection campaign, with a newly formed super PAC pouring another $25 million into battleground states.

Preserve America is set to begin running a trio of TV commercials savaging Democrat Joe Biden as Republicans express growing alarm over the president’s absence on the airwaves. Trump — who went dark for part of August and has since cancelled advertising in key states — is being outspent more than 2-to-1 by Biden this week, according to the media tracking firm Advertising Analytics.

The outside group, which is expected to draw funding from prolific GOP givers including Las Vegas casino mogul Sheldon Adelson and Home Depot co-founder Bernie Marcus, is rushing to fill the void. Starting late this week, the super PAC will begin airing ads in seven states, including some where Trump is getting badly outspent.

With Trump’s once-formidable cash advantage

Read More

Trump appointee Michael Caputo takes leave of absence from HHS after online rant

Michael Caputo, a top Trump administration communications official who in a private online social media video accused government scientists of “sedition” and called on the president’s supporters to arm themselves ahead of the election, announced in a statement Tuesday that he’s taking temporary medical leave from the Department of Health and Human Services.

Also leaving HHS is Caputo’s senior advisor, Dr. Paul Alexander. HHS confirmed the departures in a separate statement, noting that Caputo’s leave would last 60 days.

Caputo tells ABC News he will continue collecting a paycheck and health insurance from his HHS post while on leave.

The staff departures follow media reports that Caputo and Alexander had pressured the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to alter scientific reports.

On Sunday, in a private Facebook Live video, Caputo — a one-time 2016 Trump campaign aide who does not have any prior experience in public health — accused

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Trump spent years targeting Indian Americans. Then Biden picked Harris.

Donald Trump has worked for years to make inroads with Indian Americans in ways Republican presidential candidates never have — recruiting volunteers at Indian grocery stores, holding events in five Indian languages and paying for targeted digital ads.

Joe Biden undercut those efforts in a matter of weeks.

First, Biden selected Kamala Harris, the daughter of an Indian mother and Jamaican father, as his running mate. Within days, Harris was speaking to Indian Americans on India’s Independence Day about her grandfather, who helped push for India’s liberation. Then she was boosting the campaign’s launch of a new Indian coalition. And last week, Biden supporters released a video with a song remix from the popular Bollywood movie “Lagaan” about an Indian village fighting British rule.

“There was a level of enthusiasm that came out of the diaspora almost immediately when Sen. Harris was named as the vice presidential nominee,” said Rep.

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Did Oracle offer a TikTok deal to serve Trump?

Here are some of the strange things about Oracle’s deal for TikTok’s U.S. social media platform that make it seem like a sop to President Trump.

— Structuring the deal as one in which Oracle is a “trusted tech partner” of TikTok rather than an outright buyer doesn’t do anything to wall off the app from its Chinese founders, which supposedly was at the heart of Trump’s concern about the app.

— TikTok, which allows users to post short videos online, is a major hit among consumers, especially young users. To say Oracle has never served that market would be a huge understatement; Oracle’s core market is business — most consumers are probably unaware it even exists.

The White House accepting such a deal would demonstrate that this exercise was pure grift.

Alex Stamos, Facebook’s former security chief

— Trump seemed to put his thumb on the scale favoring Oracle

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Trump, DeVos raise school choice in appeal to vexed parents

As millions of American children start the school year online, the Trump administration is hoping to convert their parents’ frustration and anger into newfound support for school choice policies that Education Secretary Betsy DeVos has long championed but struggled to advance nationally.

DeVos and President Donald Trump have repeatedly invoked school choice as the solution to parents’ woes. If public schools fail to open, they say, parents should get a cut of the district’s federal funding to send their children to private schools or for home schooling, learning pods or other options that have arisen during the coronavirus pandemic.

For Trump, it’s seen as a potential lifeline to Black and Hispanic voters, who are more likely to support vouchers and other school choice options, polls have found. Speaking at the White House in July, Trump declared that “there is nothing that the African American community wants more than school choice.”

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Has Trump spent his election war chest before the war really starts?

<span>Photograph: Tannen Maury/EPA</span>
Photograph: Tannen Maury/EPA

More than $180,000 per second. That is what Donald Trump’s two TV ads during the Super Bowl worked out at in February, offering vivid proof of the outsized role of money in American politics – and of his re-election campaign’s premature and profligate spending.

The 2020 presidential election has been described by both sides as the most important in living memory and is certainly proving the most expensive. Hundreds of millions of dollars have flooded both campaigns and, in the pandemic-enforced absence of shaking hands and kissing babies, may prove even more influential than usual.

Related: Joe Biden forced to make his fundraisers fully virtual – bar the price tag

But while Joe Biden and the Democratic National Committee (DNC) raised a record $365m in August, it was revealed this week that the Trump campaign has surrendered what was once a $200m cash advantage. It has already

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Trump enters campaign home stretch facing a perfect storm of fundraising hurdles

WASHINGTON — Having lost his cash advantage, President Donald Trump has entered the final stretch of his re-election race facing a perfect storm of fundraising headwinds, including a base of big donors who are maxed out, choosing to sit on the sidelines or shifting resources to increasingly competitive Senate races.

Trump raised $210 million in August — a sizable sum, but far short of Democratic nominee Joe Biden’s $365 million haul. Despite having a nearly three-year fundraising head start on Biden, at the end of July both campaigns had nearly the same amount of money remaining in their war chests. Neither campaign has released their full financial filings for August.

Now, heading into the final weeks of the race, many major Republican donors have maxed out on how much they can legally give. Others are hesitant to give more after seeing the campaign burn through $800 million this cycle only

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Trump says he downplayed danger; Senate to vote on $300B relief bill; layoffs persist

The Senate will vote on a slimmed-down coronavirus relief bill Thursday that Democrats are expected to block.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer called the plan – which doesn’t include a second stimulus check – an “emaciated bill.” But Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said he was “optimistic” Republicans would support it.

The estimated $300 billion proposal, dubbed the Delivering Immediate Relief to America’s Families, Schools and Small Businesses Act, includes bolstered unemployment benefits, funding for schools and liability protections for businesses and health care facilities.

And universities across the country continue to contend with COVID-19 challenges. The University of Wyoming on Wednesday extended its fall return for the second time in a week, while the University of Wisconsin-Madison shifted to online education for two weeks.

Some significant developments:

📈 Today’s numbers: The U.S. has more than 6.3 million confirmed cases and more than 190,000 deaths,

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