Worried

Accountants worried about environmental and social issues

Accountants are deeply concerned about social and environmental issues, according to a new global survey by the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants.

The report found 90 percent of the 829 accountants and finance professionals polled by the ACCA want organizations to increase their efforts to become more environmentally sustainable and make a more positive impact on society after the novel coronavirus pandemic.

The vast majority (95 percent) of the accountants surveyed for the report agreed that finance teams have a role to play in building a more socially inclusive and environmentally sustainable future. Three-quarters (75 percent) of the respondents admitted their own organizations need to change to better address social inequalities, while 85 percent felt the organizations would do less damage to the environment by adapting.

Over half the respondents (54 percent) believe they have the skills and training to address social and environmental impact management in their organization. But

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‘If I start university this year, I’m worried I won’t make friends or get the support I need’

Olivia dark, 18: ‘I’d mentally prepared to go this year and have no idea what I’d do in a gap year. I feel ready to start a new chapter in my life’ - JAY WILLIAMS
Olivia dark, 18: ‘I’d mentally prepared to go this year and have no idea what I’d do in a gap year. I feel ready to start a new chapter in my life’ – JAY WILLIAMS

For countless British school leavers, the emotional maelstrom of the past few months didn’t end on Thursday when A-level results were announced.

This weekend, many Year 13 students are grappling with the dilemma of what to do next. Accept a university offer, even though they might miss out on the full student experience because of the pandemic? Or defer or reject a place, until some semblance of normality returns?

With little or no face-to-face teaching at universities until 2021, the prospect of starting an expensive degree just doesn’t add up for some students.

There are also fears that all the fun of starting university, and opportunities to make friends, will be missing because freshers’ week

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More than 1,000 aspiring surgeons couldn’t take a critical online exam after the system failed. Now they’re left worried it may never happen.

surgeon
surgeon

HRAUN/Getty Images

  • An exam taken by surgeons in the US saw its online system fail Thursday, leaving more than 1,000 aspiring surgeons in the dark on when — or if — they will take the test.

  • The test is a critical and costly part of transitioning from medical resident to a board-certified surgeon. 

  • The American Board of Surgery runs the tests and used a virtual proctor company called Proctortrack to give the test. 

  • Four aspiring surgeons told Business Insider they were frustrated with the lack of transparency and incompetence from the organization. The unknown delay could make it difficult for them to take the exam later, which requires weeks of intense studying beforehand.

  • “I have to start working,” one said. “I don’t have the financial security to sit back for a month and not be paid.”

  • For more stories like this, sign up here for our healthcare newsletter, Dispensed.

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More than 1,000 aspiring surgeons couldn’t take a critical online exam after the system failed. Now, they’re left worried if it’ll ever happen.

surgeon
surgeon

HRAUN/Getty Images

  • An exam taken by surgeons in the US saw its online system fail Thursday, leaving more than 1,000 aspiring surgeons in the dark on when — or if — they will take the test.

  • The test is a critical and costly part of transitioning from medical resident to a board-certified surgeon. 

  • The American Board of Surgery runs the tests and used a virtual proctor company called Proctortrack to give the test. 

  • Four aspiring surgeons, speaking anonymously to Business Insider, said they are frustrated with the lack of transparency and incompetence from the organization. The unknown delay could make it difficult for them to take the exam later, which requires weeks of intense studying beforehand.

  • “I have to start working,” one said. “I don’t have the financial security to sit back for a month and not be paid.”

  • For more stories like this, sign up here for our

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‘Live PD’ Edited Footage After Cops Worried They Looked Bad, Records Show

A&E
A&E

This story was published in partnership with The Marshall Project, a nonprofit news organization covering the U.S. criminal justice system. Sign up for their newsletter here.

As police work goes, the call about a suspected shoplifter was mundane.

The wrinkle? A crew for the popular A&E show Live PD was filming from inside the squad car dispatched to the scene.

Lights and sirens blare on the video footage as the Warwick, Rhode Island, police officer drives to the shopping strip. Soon, he finds the suspect: A man skateboarding out of a supermarket, pushing a full cart.

“I’m out with him,” the officer says. He revs the car’s engine. It lurches forward, swerving behind the man. Then there’s the ding of a door opening and a loud thump—the officer appears to whack the skateboarder with the open door of his cruiser. 

But the show’s millions of viewers never saw the

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