Year

‘If I start university this year, I’m worried I won’t make friends or get the support I need’

Olivia dark, 18: ‘I’d mentally prepared to go this year and have no idea what I’d do in a gap year. I feel ready to start a new chapter in my life’ - JAY WILLIAMS
Olivia dark, 18: ‘I’d mentally prepared to go this year and have no idea what I’d do in a gap year. I feel ready to start a new chapter in my life’ – JAY WILLIAMS

For countless British school leavers, the emotional maelstrom of the past few months didn’t end on Thursday when A-level results were announced.

This weekend, many Year 13 students are grappling with the dilemma of what to do next. Accept a university offer, even though they might miss out on the full student experience because of the pandemic? Or defer or reject a place, until some semblance of normality returns?

With little or no face-to-face teaching at universities until 2021, the prospect of starting an expensive degree just doesn’t add up for some students.

There are also fears that all the fun of starting university, and opportunities to make friends, will be missing because freshers’ week

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A Week At A University In Detroit, MI, That Costs $30,000 A Year

Welcome to Money Diaries College Edition where we are tackling the ever-present taboo that is money. We’re asking real people how they spend their hard-earned money during a seven-day period — and we’re tracking every last dollar.

Today: a public health major at a university that costs $30,000 per year who spends some of her money this week on a cupcake.

Major: Public Health with Pre-Med
Age: 21
Location: Detroit, MI
University Size: 25,000
Yearly Tuition Cost: $30,000 (I am on a full merit scholarship that covers my tuition, housing, and meal plan)
Current Student Loan Total: $0
Salary/Allowance: I work as an MCAT tutor, which pays $25 an hour (I work three hours a week) and as a peer mentor for my university, which pays $10 an hour (our hours were reduced to 10 hours/week due to COVID)
Paycheck Amount (Every two weeks): $275
Pronouns: She/her

Monthly Expenses

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Pandemic to Create Strong Headwinds Against Holiday Spending This Year

With consumer behavior changing rapidly due to unprecedented times, industry experts and consultants expect this holiday shopping season to be a far cry from those past.

Due to the pandemic, consumers have experienced a vast amount of uncertainty — leading to fear, anxiety and conservative spending.

“Over 40 percent of Millennial and Gen Z shoppers expect to spend less this year, with a greater proportion of younger shoppers indicating this compared to older Millennials, according to our survey,” said Deborah Weinswig, chief executive officer and founder of Coresight Research, a global advisory and research firm specializing in retail and technology. “Younger shoppers are early on their jobs or are recent graduates and will be heading into the holiday season with a lower propensity to spend, given their low incomes compared to older shoppers. Savings rates in the U.S. are also on the rise, and younger shoppers are likely to want

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Back-to-School Shopping Spend Predicted to Increase This Year

Back-to-school shoppers are expected to spend a bit more this year than in 2019 — even in spite of uncertainty over school openings, according to a new survey by the International Council of Shopping Centers.

Its back-to-school survey was conducted by Engine Insights on behalf of ICSC in late July and is a representative U.S. sample of 1,005 adults 18 years of age and older.

The ICSC, which is a membership organization serving retail and real estate professionals, said the average consumer is expected to spend an average of $1,053 on back-to-school or related items, which is up approximately $200 from last year, with an expected increase in spending on electronics and furniture.

“Fluidity” is looking like the norm for back-to-school policies these days, as students and administrators remain entirely uncertain about when — or if — they will return to school. Only 26 percent of respondents indicated school would

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Some parents want to hire tutors, start mini schools this year. Most can’t afford to.

CHICAGO – Millions of parents across the nation are facing difficult decisions about what to do with their kids this school year. But the pandemic affects every family differently, for reasons that range from their socioeconomic status to their health to the fields they work in.

Some parents are in a better position than others to ensure their children stay healthy and keep up with schoolwork, and researchers are raising questions about how the pandemic may exacerbate existing educational inequalities.

“Kids who are disproportionately low-income are at highest risk for learning losses,” said Ariel Kalil, a professor at the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy. “When these gaps in learning open up, absent some really serious and sustained intervention, the kids won’t (catch up). That will result in less academic achievement, lower lifetime earnings and even lower productivity in adulthood.”

USA TODAY spoke with more than a dozen

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Online school? Some parents want to hire tutors, start mini schools this year. Most can’t afford to.

CHICAGO – Millions of parents across the nation are facing difficult decisions about what to do with their kids this school year. But the pandemic affects every family differently, for reasons that range from their socioeconomic status to their health to the fields they work in.

Some parents are in a better position than others to ensure their children stay healthy and keep up with schoolwork, and researchers are raising questions about how the pandemic may continue to exacerbate existing educational inequalities.

“Kids who are disproportionately low-income are at highest risk for learning losses,” said Ariel Kalil, a professor at the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy. “When these gaps in learning open up, absent some really serious and sustained intervention, the kids won’t (catch up). That will result in less academic achievement, lower lifetime earnings and even lower productivity in adulthood.”

USA TODAY spoke with more than

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Miami-Dade County Public Schools to begin school year online only and later Aug. 31 date

Miami-Dade County Public Schools will start the school year remotely — and late — on Aug. 31, school officials announced Wednesday.

Students, parents and teachers have been anticipating what some would say was an inevitable decision by school officials. With less than a month to go and an infection rate in Miami-Dade County more three times higher than the school district’s goal of 5%, reopening schools by the original Aug. 24 date was deemed impossible.

The announcement came during a special School Board meeting.

“We are ever cognizant that many families have already begun planning for a return to schooling through their preferred model for Stage II,” said Miami-Dade Schools Superintendent Alberto Carvalho. “However, in light of the viral surge in our community, we believe it is in the best interest of our students and employees to delay the return to the schoolhouse and commence the 2020-2021 school year from

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Should You Buy Tuition Insurance for College This Year?

You insure your house and auto without thinking twice, but have you considered buying insurance for college tuition?

Considering the average annual cost for tuition, room and board at U.S. colleges was $24,623 for the 2018-19 school year, a four-year degree will likely cost more than your car (and maybe your house).

But is tuition insurance worth the cost — and what does it cover (particularly in light of the coronavirus)? Check out our cheat sheet for what you need to know about tuition insurance, especially this year.

What is Tuition Insurance?

In general, tuition insurance is a policy you can buy that will refund your college costs in case you need to withdraw due to an unexpected medical event.

Tuition insurance differs from a refund from your college. Learning institutions typically offer complete or partial tuition refunds on a very limited basis, based on their own internal policies.

Finding

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Netflix has 113 brand new shows coming out this year (so far). See them all here.

Katherine Langford as Nimue in "Cursed."
Katherine Langford as Nimue in “Cursed.”

Netflix

  • Netflix currently has 113 brand new TV shows slated to premiere in 2020.

  • Insider is keeping a running list of the confirmed shows and what we know about them so far.

  • Up next in July is a new fantasy series called “Cursed,” reality show “Skin Decision: Before and After,” and the docuseries “Fear City: New York vs the Mafia.” 

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Netflix released dozens of new TV shows in 2019, and has even more planned for this year. If you want to know which shows are most worth your time, read our ranking of the best 36 Netflix originals in 2020 so far.

But there are more than 100 brand new series coming to streaming service, many of which you might not have realized even existed.

Keep reading to see all the new shows arriving on Netflix this year

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L.A. and San Diego school districts to start the year online

The two largest school districts in California announced Monday that classes will be online-only at the start of the school year, citing “skyrocketing infection rates” of the coronavirus in their areas.

The Los Angeles and San Diego unified school districts, which issued a joint announcement, will begin online instruction in mid-August but will “continue planning for a return to in-person learning during the 2020-21 academic year, as soon as public health conditions allow.”

Los Angeles Unified, the country’s second-largest school district with roughly 700,000 students, will begin instruction Aug. 18; San Diego Unified, which serves more than 100,000 students, is set to start Aug. 31.

“There’s a public health imperative to keep schools from becoming a petri dish,” Austin Beutner, the school superintendent in Los Angeles, said in a video message posted online.

In the joint announcement, the school districts said the research around coronavirus-era school safety remains “incomplete,” and

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